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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 17. »9»2- 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

Rules For Contest which Opens Sept. 
17. Seven Vacancies to be Filled. 



1916 ENROLLS 

Largest Class to Enter College Appears 
with Roll of 177. 



At a recent meeting of the Sh;n \i 
board the following luli-s wen- 
adopted for this year's competition. 
Membership to the ( ioUJKM Sm.n m. 
bo«d shall be gsdoOrl as follows: 

I. Candidates shall he voted upon 
during the first week in March by the 
members of the hoard then holding 
ollice. A two-thirds vote shall he 
necessary to election. 

I. To become a candidate for 
election each competitor must have 
twenty-five (SI) points to his credit 
before March 1. These may be 
earned as follows : 

(a) Those competing for posi- 
tions in the editorial department will 
receive one point for each 7 inches of 
original copy accepted, one point for 
each 10 inches assitjitfi reprint mat- 
ter accepted and one i>oiiit for each 
two-hour period spent in oll'iee-work. 
Assignments will be in charge of O. 
<;. Anderson 'IS, who ordinarily will 
make certain assignments on request. 
The refuting of assembly speeches, 
addresses, etc.. is reprint work. 

yb) TlMMM K.mpeting for posi- 
tions in the business department will 
receive MM point for each $4.00 
worth of new advertising matter 
secured, and one point for each two- 
hour period spent in office- work. 
The renewal of old advertisements 
will Ik? considered as office work. 
Work in this department will be in 
charge of the business manager, 
»rge Zabriskie 2ml, 'It, who will 
make all assignments. 

:i. The numlter of positions open 
in each class, iu the editorial depart- 
ment is, 1U14-1 , I91*-S,aad liie-S; 
in the business department, 191H 
and 191 C~l. 

4. The bOSffd reserves the right 
to withhold election in either depart- 
ment, if, in its judgment the poor 
work of any one group of candidates 
justifies it. In such case the com- 
petition for vacancies will be in 
« -barge of the new board, after it has 
come into office on March 1">. 



TUG-OF-WAR A DRAW 

Sophomores and Freshmen Tussle for 
Twenty-Seven Minutes. 



The class of 1914 has just regis- 
tered with a total enrollment of 177. 
This is the largest class in the his- 
tory of the college, being an increase 
over last year's class of eight. The 
class roll is as follows : 

Haverhill 

(juincy 

Somerville 

Manchester 

Plymouth 

Haverhffi 




PHOTOGRAPHER TO BE CHOSEN 

The following announcement comes 
from Prof. Frank A. Waugh of the 
landscape department : 

••Thecnre of the photography labo- 
ratory at Wilder hall will be awarded 
this year on the basis of a competi- 
tive examination. The examination 
will be very simple— merely enough 
to indicate who is the best candidate Harroc ki, T. L 
for the place. It is a good perma- Hart, R. 
nent job for the right sort of student, i Haskell, F. h. 
I shall be glad to give further partic- , Hathaway, U b. 

,. .. M t Continued on PM« 2 

ulats on application. 



Aiken, H. 
Allen, C. K. 
Anderson, f, A. 
Andrews, K. N. 
Itarnes, K. I.. 
bean, H. J. 
Iteeler, L. C. 
Bishop, H. W. 
Bisbee, Philip 
Blanpied. M. U. 
Bradley, W. 1). 
Brazil, W. H. 
Brush, I). C. 
Burnham, C. A. 
Burt, W. H. 
Caldon, J. J. 
Caldwell, H. N. 
Cardarelli, K.J. 
Carruth, i>. H. 
Carver, K. W. 

, K. M. 
Chamlterlain, K. 
Chisholm. K. L 
Choate, C. K. 
("lapp. R I 
dough, C H. 
Coleman, A. S. 
Cobban, 1). S. 
Coley, W. S. 
Curran, H. A. 
Curtin, C, W. 
Cushing, R. A. 
Danforth, K. N. 
Davis, F. I . 
Dickinson, W. C. 
Dine, H. B. 
Dinsmore, D. S. 
Doggett, W. H. 
Doherty, P. ft. 
Duffill, S ft. 
Dumas, W. !>■ 
Dunbar, H. H. 
Kd wards, M. M 
Kldredgr, K C. 
Eldridge. C. C. 
Epstein, H B. 
Fernald. C. H , 2nd 
Fielding, L. ft. 
Fisher, G. B. 
Fox. ft. L 
Francis, C. B. 
(iaventa. H. K. 
Gilmore, B. A. 
(.ioiosa, A. A. 
Glover, T.W. 
Goodwin, C. F. 
Googins, B. 
Gordon, L S. 
Could, 

Graves, R. W. 
Gray, F. L 
Gunn, C. M. 
Hager, C. S. 
Hall.S. W. 
Harriman, C. K. 
Harris, W. L 



Adams 
Doylestown, Fa. 
Waitsfield, Vt. 
Framingham 
Groton 
Leominster 
Vineyard Haven 
West ford 
Longmeadow 
W. Springfield 
Lowell 
Boston 
( Irange 
Plymouth 
Canton 
Newbury, Vt 
Melrose Highlands 
Framingham 
Nnrtbfield 
Dedham 
Mendon 
Worcester 
Wilton, Conn. 
Marlboro 
Auburndale 
Somerville 
Foxcroft 
Hoped ale 
North Amherat 
Boston 
Springfield 
Dedham 
Fall Kiver 
Melrose Highlands 
Boston 
Taunton 
Lawrence 
North Abmgton 
Natick 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Maiden 
Millbury 
Winthrop 
Cranford, N. J 
Kepaupo, N.J. 
Acushnet 
Dorchester 
Duxbury 
Haverhill 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Clinton 
Worcester 
Ash field 
Ashfield 
Sunderland 
Somerville 
Saxonville 
Kxeter, N. H. 
Deerfield 
Westminster 
Montague City 
Northboro 
Somerset 



The annual tug-of-war took plan 
on Friday afternoon, and proved to football team w 
be 1 slight disappointment to the 1500 Samson 
spectators who lined the pond, since 
neither of the two competing class.- 
could pull the other through the 
water. The sophomores were cap- 
tained by .loseph 8. Pike of Somer- 
ville. while the freshmen were led by 
( harles Fernald of Amherst. Shortly 
after four o'clock. Referee Gordon 
tired the shot which marked the 
beginning of the longest pull ever 
hold at the college. After twenty- 
seven minutes of straining and 
" heaving." the contest was called of 
by President Butterliehl. The Senate 
agreed to lea\e the decision as to the 
winner to the referee. Professor 
Gordon, in his answer, stated that he 
believed that the freshmen had gained 
the most advantage and consequently 
the sophomores would not have the 
right to confiscate the freshman class 
banners. 



No. 1 
FOOTBALL PRACTICE 

Large Squad Preparing for Game with 
Rhode Island on Campus. 

The first call for candidates for the 

■, issued by ('apt. 

ago yesterday and 

although only a do/en men were at 

college to report at that time, the 

nOOd lias continued to grow until 

now. prospect! look g 1 for three 

teams in the field this year. Most of 
the men are new to the game; others 
ha\e had experience on last year's 
second team, and si\ are men who 
ha\e already seen one or more years 
on the varsitv. 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

I ... , ItttkUaa *m* '■•"•'■ " ; ' 
college gave the freshmen their 
annual reception in the drill hall Fri- 
.lav evening. There was a large 
attendance of students, profess.,. I 
:,nd ladies of the faculty. After the 
b« was broken Lloyd G. lmvics 11. 
vice-president of the association, in- 
troduced President Butterliehl as tin 




('\i-iain >\u-..\ 

Coach Brides arrived iu time to 
take charge of the nidi at the first 
practice. Professor Hicks and 
( ;,orge ( hapmaii of the athletic coiili- 
,.j| .,„. (,, ,s.ist Dr. Brides in develop- 
ing the teams P.. sides the varsitv 



iriKIUCeO I M-sio.-i.t. w..*— —n 

first speaker of the evening. The there is .0 be a stroi, ml team 

. . • 1 1 a. \i ni'i". 1 



President welcomed the freshmen on 
t.ehalf of the faculty, and. with Dr. 
Chamberlain and Associate Dean 
Lewis, who followed, warmly com- 
mended the work of the association, 
and expressed tin- desire of seeing a 
large increase in membership. 
Members of the student body repre- 
senting some of the more prominent 
college activities outlined what the 
college was doing in the various lines 
of activity, and what it hOfOd to do 
with help from P.H6. After the 
speeches there was dancing; music 
was furnished by the college orches- 
tra. The committee iu charge of the 
reception was Davies '14, Post 'Li 
and Lesure '13. 



1). .1. Lewis 'II asst. business 
manager of the Roister Pointers took 
a flying trip to New York and New 
.Jersey last week to arrange for the 
annual "western" trip for the 
dramatics. This bids fair to out- 
class the successful trip of last year's 
cast. Arrangements are being made 
for several short trips in this part of 
the state and the season gives every 
promise of being the best yet. 



and a freshman eleven. Malta. 
Oortil and assistant malinger 
I'll ill III ■ are at work upon schedules 
forth.- second ami freshman teams as 
well as the regular varsitv schedule. 
With three team-- in the field it will 

make it I * 'asicl to develop a 

strong fust team. Three regulars 
and several good s.eoi.d string men 
were lost last June by graduation 

Several of the best n have failed 

to return. The men lost by gradua- 
tion were (apt. Walker. Hubert and 
Moreau. Larsen decided to enter 
< oin.-ll and Haydcu has gone into 
business in Boston. Johnson will 
be missed from .enter which position 
he has played more or less regularly 
for the past two years. " Mike 
Brewer must watch the games from 
the side lines this year because of tin- 
injury received by bis right foot in 
the Syracuse baseball game last May. 

Another - M " nan who must be 

saved for baseball is Huntington who 
played half two seasons ago. 

As I nucleus for thi^ year's eleven 
there is Kdgcrton for left Md and 
milieu for the extreme right, ('apt. 
Samson will in all probability hold 






I 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 17, 1912 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 17, 1912- 









down hi* eld posltioa s< l.fi tackle 
and Uakcr will bt beside bin at 
guard. Gore and Smith, two other 
reterana will be found behind tbeline 
either at quarter or in the baekfleld. 
Nlssen is back :.t his old station at 
right half. 
The hi<r#'*t problem confronting 

the coaches is to develop a Strong 
enough line to earn the team through 
the season with a light hackfield. 
The freshman candidates are fairly 
numerous and there is hope of some 
good material from this source. 
From laal year's scrubs there are one 
or two men who are expected to 
make good this Ht-aaon. (irillin has 

already played hi serstal biggmnea 

Sad, although rather light, has 
already proven his worth SJ a guard. 
DOSS of last year'-, freshman team in 
looked upon m | possibility for the 
center position. Jasenhaure and 
Fuller are two of tin' heavier BUM 
who are also likely candidates. 

.Manager C..\ill lias arranged the 

usual number <»f gnussj for this 

season. Dartmouth. Holy OoUB, 
Tufts, .New Hampshire and Spring- 
field college ale all included 
as in former year-. University of 
Vermont, Union and Bost on college 

are the new comers. The first game 
will he played Saturday afternoon on 
the campus when Rhode Island State 
will he the opponents. The bojl 
from Kingston, iiudci the ellicient 
coaching of Qeorga Cobb, the old 

" Aggie " star, have developed some 
strong teams during the past few 

yam a. Laal y» tac rasultod in 

a victory for the risltora l»v a « r > to 
score. This year's contest is ex- 
pected to he as close since hoth teams 
will undoiihtedly he handicapped lev- 
lack of practi- 



1916 ENROLLS 

(Continued from first pag«] 



Hemenway, J. S. 
Hendry, A. K. 

Hobart, k. 1 

Holden. Miss II, K 
Hulsi/cr. A L 
Hunt. K. S. 
Hun^tington, C. A 
Jenna, \V. \\ 
Jerome, F. \V 
Jones, L. H. 
Kaplan, 11. 
Keegan, V. C. 
Kelly, H. K 
Kennedy, G. W 
Kilhon, R. < . 
King, K. L 
Kinsman, A. A. 
Kitsis, H. H 
Knapton, G. L 
Laird, K. B. 
I.amoureux, I). J. 
Lehman, \V.. I). 
Lieber, C. H. 
Lind(juist, A. 
Locke. \V. T. 
Lyford, W. I'. 
Mac Don aid, N. D. 
Mahoney, W. J. 
Mann, V. I.. 
Marshall. I.. LaF, 
Mattoon, H. (L 
M.iynard, H. S. 
McCulloch, M. E. 
Meade, J. \\ . 
Mimitz, J. K. 



Williamsburg 

Milton 

North Amherst 

Koyalston 

r kminnton, N. J. 

Hridgewaler 

I'oquonock, Conn. 

Leominster 

Stockbridge 

Mil ford 

Maiden 

Turners Falls 

Haverhill 

Sayville, L. I. 

Springfield 

Dorchester 

Merrimac 

Huston 

Lawrence 

Hrockton 

Adams 

Worcester 

Jamaica (Main 

Jamaica 1'lain 

Methuen 

Natick 

Melrose 

Winthrop 

Millers Falls 

Hadley 

Pittsfield 

Holden 

Pawtucket, K. L 

West Springfield 

Hadley 



Montgomery- l'eter 
Morton, W. J. 
Moses, C. W. 
Moss, E. C 
Mostrom, H. A. 
Murphy, J W. 
Nash, C. W. 
Nestle, W.J. 
Nicholson, J. I'. 
Noyes, S. V. 
O'Hrion, K. F. 
Oertel, A. L. 

Painter, G. B. 

Phelps, S. W. 
Pierce, J. D. 
Plaisted. P. A. 
Porter, P. C. 
Potash, Philip 
Potter, D. 
Pratt, W. A. 
I'routy, S. M. 
• Jumcy, K. 
Ray, <;. 1$. 
Reed, A.J. 
Kendall, l< E, 

Rich, <;. w. 

Ki( iiards, E. S. 
Richardson, L. K. 
Ricker, D. \ 
Rogers, R. W. 
Rogers, T S. 
Rowe. L. V. 
Russell, E. S. 
Ryan, W. 11. 
Sanderson, K. S. 
Saunders, W. P. 
Scheufele, 
Schlotterheck. L. R 
Shapiro, F. S. 
Slurinyan, S. I). 
Simmons, P. 
Sauter, William II 
Smith, H. A. 
Smith. P. L. 
Stanford, K. 1 
Stearns, F. C. 
Stone. A. K. 
Stoughton, R. 
Swan, I). 
Swift, R. W. 
Taber. R F. 
I.itl.ell, H. H. 
Taylor, H. 
Topham, T. A. 

t. R.S. 
Upham, I 
Verheck, 
Walkden, H. II. 
Webster, F. C, 
Walker, H. M. 
Walker, R. R. 
Warner, L. P. 
Wt isbein, I. 
Wells, HA. 
Wentworth, K. L. 
Wetherbee, R. S. 
Wheeler, C. W 
Wheeler, R. K. 
Whitney, H. T. 
Wies, Calmy 
Wilcox, T. P. 
Wildon. C I.. 



I". Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boston 

TicoHderoga, N. Y. 

Worcester 

North Middleboro 

Beverly 

South Weymouth 

Amherst 

Leominster 

( ieorgetown 

Somerville 

South Hadley Falls 

Hrookline 

Turners Falls 

Springfield 

Arlington 

West Springfield 

Boston 

Concord 

Dalton 

North Brookfield 

Roslindale 

Hingham 

Dalton 

Melrose 

Hingham 

Northampton 

Millis 

Worcester 

Roxbury 

Saxonville 

Melrose 

Hadley 

Stoughton 

Centreville, R. I. 

Lawrence 

South Natick 

oxbury Station.Conn. 

Lynn 

Worcester 

Pittsficld 

Turners Falls 

Newtown, Conn. 

Kingston 

Rowe 

Waltham 

Worcester 

Montague 

Dorchester 

North Amherst 

Phoenix Mills, N. Y. 

Warren 

Florida, N. Y. 

Lawrence 

Seymour, Conn. 

Fitchburg 

Maiden 

Westford 

Harvard 

South Harwich 

Mansfield 

North Amherst 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dalton, Pa. 

East Dover, Vt 

Waltham 

Southboro 

Grant Barrington 

Maiden 

Lowell 

Melrose Highlands 



GOV. FOSS IN CHAPEL 

(Joy. Eugene N. Foss, accom- 
panied by his council, visited the col- 
lege Thursday on a brief tour of 
inspection, and addressed the student 
body in the chapel. He emphasized 
the need of economy in state expend- 
itures and stated that in his opinion 
the college had been most liberally 
dealt with. He closed with the 
assurance of his hearty co-operation 
in aiding the college in every move- 
ment for its uplift and development. 
The (iovernor was followed by the 
Col. (Jeorge Goeting of Springfield 
who gave a brief talk. 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLECE FOOTWEAR 




Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

$5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Page's Shoe Store, 



BKTWKEN THE BANKS 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fohs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes, Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. .'. .*. .*. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Moims: 
BtolBA.M. i.:t<M<ini>.M. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY'S 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. EI. EI. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



o? 



C. R. ELDER 



FRESHMAN 

The best place in town to buy Drugs, Chemicals, Patent 
Medicines, Toilet Articles, Stationery, 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes 



Post Cards, Fountain Pens, and Photographic Supplies 



Henry Adams & Co. 



Tll«3 Rl£:XA.rvI-* <St01«e3 Q«* ***« Corner 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 

Cigars & Cigarettes 

TOBACCO 



RUSHING RULES 

The irati'inity confm-iHf baa 
drawn sp the following Miles in 
regard to the rushing :>uil pledging 
of freshmen. 

1. The nwbing season shall open 
the dftj college opens. 

'I. Tin- rushing season shall end 
at g o'clock ou Sunday evening the 
17th of November. 

:i. Freshmen shall pledge during 
chapel on the second Monday before 
Thanksgiving. Pledge buttons shall 
be put on at that time only. 

1. Candidates for fraternitio 
must be undergraduates and must also 
be .•andidates for a four year degree. 

;.. The rushing of freshmen i> to 
be done only by the undergraduate 
members of the fraternities of this 




A 



THE STORE 



*hf35 



/? 



ETTER 



rollege. 



A T 



The College Drug Store 



RESOLUTIONS 

IfJnreas, It has pleased I .««l in Ins 
infinite wisdom to take to liims.-lf our 
friend and classmate lloi fa cr l Cahri* 
Kobinson ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we the members of 
the class, 1914, do extend to his family, 
our sincerest sympathy in this their hout 
of grief ; and be it further 

Rtdvdx That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the bereaved family, and 
that a copy be published in the (01 1 1 <.i 

SlONAL. 

Wakkkn Skaks ItAKKR, / For the 
1)1 TTMAR VV. Jom s, S Class 

»ftj. — Edward T. (lark married to 
Mi-s Kittie Ma\ Uice on .June 21th. 



i2r CLOTHES! 

FALL OPENING!!! 

We want every reader ol this announcement to consi-le. il a p*f*M»al 

(rotation to attend ..... I all Opeaia* Ow store hi mid to omflowiag w.th 
fall outlining, atagaal new garaawta ol all kiadafoi jroang .wen, new hats 

and new creations ID lOggCfJ of all soils. II you've never been here for 
your clothes come to *M what you've been missing. 

Everything Sold at a Rt*to **bk Pria 
SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



They arc now reM 



klins in Shirley. 



The Worthy ' cotrell and lE0|tARD 



1 i< ask II DAMfOI ril. KM 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 




ALBANY, 
N. Y. 



Makers 
•t 



A GOWNS 

To the American CoUCfOffOBl the At- 
• .--- — lanuc to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 

Amherst Corner In KathMkrtlar. Spec ; a i, y 

. 

Toefll Mientka 

snots Shintd and Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Order* left at th«- Amhrr.t Houw will r«:«i»e SyM •......!«> «»•'■ « 

prompt .ttention Oi Ml t Ps I ' 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



RESERVED FOR FATIMA 



Boston Safety Fountain Pen 
Cannot Leak 




Sectional view of the Bo 9 ton Safety Fountain Pen showing 
Gold Pen and Comb Feed encased in the Air light 
Pen Receiving Chamber which presents ,t from leaking. 
Made in three lengths for trousers pocket - or Wcrvcat 
pocket or ladies purse and regular full length, also self-filling. 
An absolutely guaranteed fountain pen. 



Exclusive Agent 



IS. MII^H^TX 



For Amherst 



The College Signal, Tuesa.7, September 17, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. September 17, iQ' »■ 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students o' the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

K. II. \ ANXW M.I-'.NHUKO'i.l.Kditnr in-Chief 
C 1 1 1ST E K E.W 1 1 1 . E I . B Km. M an»i«in|{Editor 
OSCAR G. SKDBR^ON '1 \. Assist ant Kditor 
FREDERICK D. GRIGGS »»J. Athletic Kditor 
s. MILLER IORDAN '13, Athletic Editor 
HARRY W. A I I EN '13. Alumni Kditor 

STUART H. FOS1 KK '14. Depaitment Editor 
B l< V I N B K. PA R K E R '13, Alumni Kditor 

(. ALBERT I'RK'K'iv Associate Kditor 

ELBERT F. MOOR E '15, Associate Kditor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT- 
OKOROE EABRISKIR 2.1. '1?. Hus. Manager 
ERNEST 5, CI.AKK.I R '14. U-t Hiiv Manager 
ERNEST P. UPTON '14. As-t. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE I, CLOUGH'iS, Circulation 

Subscription $1 50 per vear. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 



Entered as second-* '»*s 
Poet Office. 



matte' st the Amherst 



Vol. XXII. TursuAv, Skpt. 17. Not 

Tim rules fur the Sionai. compe- 
tition appear <>ii another |»:i"C«". The 
endeavor this year has baM ke fnime 
rolai which will nut render the addi- 
tiun of new members to Um board 
entirely mechanical i»ut which will 

give considerable latitmh' and will 

permit tin- beard to enoose the best 
men, not forcing it to se oepl those 

whose only qualification is the quan- 
tity of woik they have submitted. 

Here is bm enanee f<»r tin- fellow who 

is nut athletic SO find himself. Oat 
off the ride Knee sad into the game. 



TiiKKK is one little •■|tuinter" whieh 
many freshmen will he glad to re- 

oehre before ii i> too late. h<> *>»»<- 

Ihni'j for your college and for your 
class, (id into the activity to which 
von are best suited. Do not lie 
hark and say -that's all right for 

those fellows who eaa do something; 

I'm not one of that kind." (Jive 

yow e et f a eheBc i to "make feed." 

A "loafer" is OBC of the most ctTect- 
nal clogs known in any college ; 

•here is only one thing worse than ■ 

"loafer" and that is the man whose 
ehlef ambition and delight is to 
"knock." Very few tan hope to 
beOOSSe varsity material Init they MR 
help to develop the varsity teams. 
To the imatliletie varied and 
numerous activities lie open: rifie- 

ihootJBSj! dramatics, music, and the 

like, (let into something and work 
for all you are worth in whatever 
line you enter. Let ns have the col- 
lege lure boQing with enthusiasm 
and energy ; a campus on which 
every man is putting forth all his 
efforts to carry the Maroon and 
WUte to the front, and to keep it 

there. 

Maurice J. ('lough '1"> of Swamp- 
•COll was last week chosen to succeed 
M. B. Sahen ex-'lo in the htisiness 
department of the Sn.wi.. At the 
close of last year's competition ("lough 
had the second largest number of 
points to his credit. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Rhode Island State on the campus 
Saturday. 

How soon will there he hot water 
in South? And where, U where, are 
the all-night lights? 

The seniors were more or MMS 
pleased to find that the tree which 
they planted with such elahorate care 
last spring was still alive and nourish- 
ing. 

The proprietors of the " hot dog 
cafe" are reaping a golden harvest as 
the result of the "hash house" hoing 
dosed. It is rumored that they are 
to retire the latter part of the year 
and live on their income. 

A squad of thirty men has re- 
poited for fOOtbaU so far. While a 
good many of these are " huskies " 
there should he more men out to 
make a strong second team that will 
keep the varsity on the jump. 

A party of seventeen hiked over to 
the ritle range Saturday in an 
endeavor to qualify for the second 
class. All live targets were in use 
and some ten men reached the 
required mark of C.s out of a possible 

110. 

A large nuinher of students, hoth 
old and new. greeted the President at 
the first assembly of the year, held 
Wednesday afternoon. Associate 
Dean K M. Lewis led the devotional 
exercises ami (apt. < ieuige ('. Martin 
outlined changes in the military 
department. After the assemhly a 
student mass meeting was held. 

The senate istiying out a new sys- 
tem for keeping the papers and 
magazines in the Social luion room 
in Qtder. It is hoped that this 
scheme will work, as reading matter 
is a great addition to the attractive- 
ness of such a room. A new piano 
has heen installed in the Social Union 
also and this no douht will doits 
share towar d adding to the comforts 
of the luion. 



Change of Location 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PARKS, 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Mall St., Northampton 



We Carry the Largest Line 



-of — 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

rugs 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13 



We have a full line of Manners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

RASKMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eld ridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELLS 



THE FRESHMAN PARADE 

Another nuinher on the freshman 
program was rendered Saturday 
evening when the annual freshman 
night shirt parade was held. Shortly 
after dark IM freshmen ehul in 
"evening dress" surged down Pleas- 
ant street to the center. A lone 
freshman led the procession playing 
a trombone ; hehind him a cart-loud 
of seniors was pulled and pushed 
along by "'freshies" while in the rear 
a long line of "pea greens" hearing 
posters snake-danced the width of 
the street. Immediately thinking the 
freshmen a heavy guard of sopho- 
mores prodded the freshies into yell- 
ing "Green" and shouting "How 
green we are." < >n reaching the cen- 
ter, impromptu speeches from about 
fifteen of the freshmen were called 
for. After half an hour of such per- 
formances under the direction of the 
class captain. .1. S. Pike '15, from 
the wagon-seat, the procession made 
its way back to the chapel where it 
broke up. 



C&rp*rvter & Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH DlocK, Amherst 



R. S. Bkagm, '14, Agent. 

Kappa Sigma House 



SENATE RULES 

1. As a mark of respect all 
students are expected to recognize the 
members of the faculty by the 
military salute. 

•J. That in addition, the members 
of the freshman class, between Sept. 
i:i (not Sept. 2(1 as given in Christian 
Association handbook) ami Christ- 
mas vacation, when on the college 
grounds shall recognize all members 
of the senior class in the RUM 
manner. 

.5. Freshmen shall not he permit- 
ted to smoke on the college grounds, 
save in their own rooms until they 
have defeated the sophomores in 
MMM regular athletic contest. 

1. Students arc expected to di 
neatly and decently at all times; 
furthermore. freshmen sh:dl be 
required to wear coals :it all times 
unless p:irticip:iting in athletics or 

doing work. 

, r ,. Should the freshman class lose 
the tug-of-war. the sophomore elass 
-hall he at liberty to confiscate :ill 
freshman class banners displayed by 
that class, either in their rooms, or 
on the campus, during the freshman 
sear at college. 

g, No student shall wear any pre- 
paratory school letters or numerals 
on cap. jersey or sweater, while on 
the campus. 

7. Between Sept II ami the 
Christmas vacation freshmen shall 
appear at all times while in the limits 
of the town of Amherst, wearing the 
prescribed freshman cap. The said 
cap shall consist of Mack skull cap 
with a 1 l-l inch green hutton. 

H. Freshmen shall he required to 
do all necessary work connected with 
■Indent activities. 



founded agricultural college. Presi- 
dent Clark placed Mr. Cana\an in 
charge of the horticultural work of 
the college. After the resignation 
of President Clark he was made jan- 
itor of the College, having charge of 
the chapel, dormitories and recitation 
rooms, and Ml subsequently re- 
tained by each succeeding admin- 
istration. 

Mr. (anavan always took a keen 
interest in the --hoys" and knew 
mnny of them well. To many of 
their jokes, pranks and stunts he 
Otosod an eye although when not in 
sympathy he never hesitated tO BX« 
press US opinion. The students 
frequently tried his patience and 
added to his ta>k> hut every Aggie 
man knew that in time of need he 
eould count upon "Tom" (anavan. 

He was beloved by those who came 
in intimate contact with him and 
Inspected l»> all. In him the college 
l,,ses I staunch supporter for it BBS 
I, in bOBSt that he knew the SOUSgC 
,.„stoms and sports (TOW the .lay of 

the post boat-race on las Oonuectl- 

eut when the Aggfe dew led the big 
colleges home, to the last baSlt'sIl 
victory over Amherst. When the 
,l :( ,> of '71 held their leiinion they 
insisted upon taking Mr. CanSTOB 
with them in an aiitomohile that he 
might he out with the ••hoys'" again. 
He leaves hehind hiui four chil- 
dren, a sister and thirteen grand- 
children. 



The Man with the Hoe 
Wants a Good Fertilizer 

For the land's sake 
give him BOWKER'S 

Don't do a gOOd Job with the boO.BJBdapOOT <»nc 
with the fertilizer. As Ion if as ><>u must hoc, why 
not have the best tH>ssiblc crops to show for it.' 
Thorough cultivation coupled with the right fertilizer, 
and enough of it, will increase the production and 
profits of any farm. 

We have a brand to lit every OTOp and every 

pocket book, and every bag of fertilizer we ship is 

backed by forty years of experiem , prompt service, 
the best materials, the best facilities. 

T»/YtlTi7'a7'I> FKKTILIZKK COMPANY, 

l5U YV i\£litv mhatham Street. lio»ton 

Original and Urgent manufacturer* of special fertilixera. 



PASSES 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



FRIEND OF M. A. C 
AWAY 

Thomas ("anavan, for forty-three 
years connected with M. A. C. in 
one capacity or another, passed away 
at. his home oil Pleasant street, the 
tlBg Of July Uth, at the age of 
nty. 
Knowing every class that had 
graduated, and associated with every 
president of the college, Mr. ( ana- 
van had shown such remarkahle tact 
l hat he gained and held the conli- 
• lence and respect not only of the 
olllcers and faculty but also of the 
nidents of whom he thought bo 
,|i, Every i4 son of old Mass - 
husette" will mourn the loss of a 
ma friend in the death of Mr. 

uiavan. 

He was horn in Roscommon cotin- 

Ireland. in 1841 and came to this 
•untry in 185*. Landing at New 
ork lie came directly to Amherst 
here he worked on the Cole and 

BStSST farms for thirteen JBBrB. 
laking the acquaintance of Prof. W. 

(lark of Amherst college he nBS 
mployed hy him in laying out the 

ounds of his new residence on Mt. 

assent 1 

Becoming president of the newly 



TENNIS 
Tennis at M. A ('. i» no longer a 
voting activity, this BSiaf IBS fourth 
year of its existence at the institution 
and hy its success in previous seasons 
should hi- entitled to consideration by 
all members of tin- college. For the 
henent of the new met. who 
are inclined towards this form of 
sport, a regular fall tournament will 
he held on the courts about the cam- 
pus. The idea is to get out 
material for varsity practice in the 
spring. The rules governing the SBBJ 
tournament will be pOBBBJ in a very 
short time end all men are earnestly 
HH|iHBtefl to lake part. Any .piestion 
eoncerning the tournament should bs 
referred to manager liokelund or 

invself. 

II. T. RoKiiiis, Captain. 



Kuppenheimers 

Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 



1L 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 










.-.•.•.•. 






PICK UPS 
Many changes on the campus an 
noticeable to returning students. 

The scaffolding upon the new Flint 
laboratory has heen taken down, the 
-rounds 'cleaned and graded and the 
building is now aknoal ready for 
0( . ( .,ipancy. The additions to Draper 
hall are not as yet completed but 
when finished will almost double the 
size of tin- building. The ravine has 
heen RHad in and the concrete walks 
leading from the dormitories to 
Draper hall are now connected by a 
boardwalk that give- urOBMBB of last- 
ing through the winter. 

A new poultry laboratory, a breed- 
ing house and a storage shed are being 




DobbseTCo 5 

Fifth Avenue Hats 



® 



»VVNNVV*NV 



MEN'S STORE 

Military Tailors, — Broocks 
Makes. Agents lor Mills, 
Mayetson Co. London Vests 

KEISER CRAVATS 

Dobbs & Co., Krofut & Knapp Hats 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR A HABERDASHER 

Amherst Store — 
Next First National Hank 

■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••'•••'•'■'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•* 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 17, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 17, 1912. 



Imilt for lilt- poultry husbiindrv 

department. 

The lighting system in North <<>l- 
lege lins been rearranged giriug night 
lights in tlit- entries and basemenl 
.is snnounced in last year's Kiuhal. 
The lighting system in South college 

has not been altered yet. 

The rooms in South OollegC 
formerly occupied bv the treasurer 
ami tin- dean arc belug made over in 
different style and srill give much 
more room than before. The dean 
and the treasurer are al present 
housed temporarily in lecture rooms 
in Smith college. 

The drill hall is do* respl ntlent 

in a <oat of grav paint, the old 

chocolate-brown being a tiling of 

the past. 

In line with the increased activity 
of the landscape department the 
roads and paths of the college are 

being well taken care of»and the cam- 
pus is given better opportunity to 
show tin- natural beauty for which it 
is so justly famed. 

%Vi-i|£lit «.V DitMMi 

I BtslOgVM til 

f+**ll 4te Wlutor Qooda 

\ re out. Cop* m.iil.-'l la m\ nMn^ ' oll.-^.- 
Stud'-nt-. mil AthlatM wli i v.mt tiin rail, tupei ioi 
articles lor the various spoils slioulil insitl upon 
tho*) bnrinc tin Wright & l>itM>n Tr*d» Marti 



Fall 4 Winter Suits & Overcoais 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order & Ready to Wear Suits 

OVER ijo SAMPLES TOCtJOOSE 

IIMM 

Order early and get the best choice 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mass. 

II. U. W Mil I 'IS. Agent 

10 Allen Stieet 



^*E. N. PARISEAU.j* 

Barber j& Shop 

RAZORS HONKU 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



Wright «**: Dttsea Good* ar.- Hie -ttmliiil fur 

I II s|ll>l ts 

►nil" j*s DlTiMJN 



xv r* 1 * ; 

V| ( W MMtOgtOO St.. 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

I'.efore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURKAN & DYER, Props. 



Button, Sl 



GENUINE - THOMAS - PHOSPHATE - POWDER 

(Basic Slag Meal 

Grows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

AT TIU 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 

Held at Boston, Mass., October 23-28, 191 1 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup for Best Commercial Ex- 
hibit of Packed Fruit. Won by Conyers T arm, (.. A. Drew, Myr, Conn. 
Silver Cup for Best Display of Baldwin Apples offered by (Governor 

Foss, of Massachusetts. Won by T. K. Winsor. Kliode Island. 
Silver Shield for Best Exhibit of Rhode Island Oreenings offered by 

(Governor t'othier.of Rhode Island. Won by T. K. Winsor, Rhode Island. 
$25.00 Cash for Best Barrel of King Apples offered !>y W ft B, Douglas 

Company, of Connecticut. Won by Elijah Rogers, Connecticut. 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Rhode Island Greenings. Won by Klijah 

Rogers, Connecticut. 
First Prize $50.00— Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or Varieties. 

Won by Conyer's Farm, G. A. Drew, Manager. Connecticut. 
Second Prize $25.00 for Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 

Varieties. Won by N. S. Winsor. Rhode Island. 
First Prize— Best Box Exhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's I arm, C. A. 

Drew, Manager, Connecticut. 
Silver fledal— Best Packed Exhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm, 

C A. Drew, Manager, Connecticut. 
First Prize— Best Box of Rhode Island Greenings. Won by T. K. 

Winsor, Rhode Island. 
Sweepstakes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market 75.00. Won 

by Conyer's Farm, (*,. A. Drew, Manager, Connecticut. 
Berlin Prize -25.00 Cash and Silver Medal. Won by Conyer's Farm, 

G. A. Drew, Manager. Connecticut. 
Connecticut Pomological Society -Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won by Conyer's Farm, G. A. Drew, General Manager, ( onnecticut. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Sweepstakes for Winning Largest 

Number of Prizes. Won by Conyer's Farm, G. A. Drew, Manager, Conn. 

Numerous Other Prizes. Won by above and other us.rs Cenuine Thomas I'hos, !n,l.- PoWdtf 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand. From 

THE COE - MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New York City 

Our Booklet, "Up-to-Oate Fruit Growing with Thomas Phosphate Powder." is sent free if you 
Ja ' v mention The College Signal. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 
glace tbe last issue of Thk Signal 
tin- members of the '-lass of 1918 
bare passed oof from Um oollege to 
enter the ranks <>f the M. A. i 
•ilii i. The greater number air en- 
gaged in Bee* HUBS Of occupation aa 
Farming, hortirultuiv, t eachi n g and 
landscape gardening, while s fen are 
taking post-graduate work. The 

men of Ike elans of IMS sja »<>" 

situated as follows : 

Art lini .J. Ackerinan. 81 1-8 Kliza- 

betk sti.-et. Worcester, state Dnraery 
inspector. 

Carlos I,. Heals, chemist at Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural Kxiieriiuent 

station. 

Lowland T Itcers. Cromwell. 

Conn.. Iloiiht. 

William U. Bent, principal of 
hiy.li school at Princeton. 

trie N. BoUnd, *0l Dull Ave.. 
Ames. la., graduate student. Iowa 

state Cottage. 
Alden c. Brett, North Abington, 

grain, hay and coal bttsinsan, 

Merle |{ Brown, on fruit farm. 
North Grafton. 

Frederick It. Ibur. Woi thingtoii. 
fanner. 

.Ie»e Carpenter. Turner Hill Farm. 
Ipawieh, on fruit faun. 

Fred A Castle. Arnold Arboretum, 
.lamaica Plain. Working in the sr- 
boretum to study plants. 

Uavmoiid K. < lapp. .Mineral \ al- 
ley Farm. Wcsthamptoii, fruit grower 

Winfre.l G. Demiag, WTethersllehl, 

Conn., farmer. 

Albert W. Dodge, South Hamilton. 
landscape forester. 

I.con K. Fagerstroin. Shrewsbury, 
with I'xickeiihain A. Miller, landscape 
architects. 

F. t). Fitts. Kingston. K. I., as- 
sistant chemist. 

Geo r g e 8 Fowler. Amherst, gradu- 
ate SSSistaiit in chemistry at Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural Ooliege. 

Lewis W.daskill.Crom well. Conn . 

florist 

,J. A. (iallaglu-r. Manchester. N. II.. 
salesman for Armour's Fertilizer 
Works. 

Robert M Cibhs, Tiemoiit Btdg, 
BoatOA, (are Munsoii-Whitakei Co.. 
forest and tree expert for Munson- 
Whitaker Co. 

Frank F. Cray. Hox 1 «- Kingston, 
greenhouse work. 

Horace W. Hall. M Broad Street. 
Boston. Boom 7."». lumber business 

Kov N. Hallowell. Ml Centre St.. 
.lamaica IMain ; engineer in Boston 

Park Dept. 

Stephen F Hamblin. 1101-W Tre- 
inont lildg. lioston ; landscape gard- 
ener with Warren H. Manning, land- 
scape designer. 

.Joseph A. Harlow. Turners Falls. 
clerk. 

•lav M Heald, Bratllcboro. Vt.. 
H. F. I). No. 0, farmer. 

Frank 15. Hills. MM Dttfl Avenue. 
! Ames, la., 

Henry L. Holland. Heading, Fa. 
chemist, with Heading Bone Fertil 
izer Co. 



Arthur F. Kingsbury. Middletown 
Conn., with the Rogers 4 Uubhar 

Co. 

Robert W LamsOtt, College Bark 
Md.. assistant in chemistry and bar 
teriologyat the Maryland agriculture 
experiment station 

Dau-Vang Fin. Yale Station. New 
Haven, Conn., student of forestry. 

Charles A. Lodge,. I r.. 781 Leaven 
worth St.. Manhattan. Kan., assis 
t :mt in botany at Kansas State Agri 
cultural College. 

Georte F. Merkie, Khodc Island 
Agricultural Kxpci imeiit Station, R. 
L. assistant chemist and entomolo- 
gist . 

notick. The rest of the list will 
be published in tin- next issue of Tin 
Signal. 



'71. -John M. Benedict has re- 
tired from the practice of me d ic ine 

and is now residing at Flindab 
Woodbury. Conn. 
74.— The chairman of the prohi 

bition party of Washington < 
Maryland, is Harris M. Zcller of 
llagelstown. 

'7.V Frank H. Rice is now situ- 
ated at 710 Madison St.. Oakland. 
Cal.. his business address being 1111 
Broadway. 

'7«. — |ohn IL Washburn report- 
having Set out an extensive peach 
Orchard of ten thousand trees. |',. 
sides being interested hi fruit- 
growing he is director of the National 
Farm School at Farm School. Fa. 

'*•_' Prof. Charles S. IMilinb of 
the Ohio State Fniversitv has just 
completed a text-book for secondary 
scl Is entitled "Beginnings in Ani- 
mal Hus b andry." 

'*:.'. — HcrlH-rt Mvrick returned thf 
mat of August from a nine Wishl 
sojourn in France and Cermaiiv. 
\\ liile abroad he took the rest cm. 
at Ba<l Nauheiin and made a study 
of Gnramn and French syuUims of 

OP ti rat JTfl banking. 

'h:\.— Charles W. Minott who hm 
been state agent of gypSf and brown 
tail moth siippussion is now an 
expert with the Rureaii of Fnloinol- 
ogy. F. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 

•*;{. _Dr. Homer .1. Wheeler was 
elected vice-president of the section 
on agricultural chemistry of th< 
eighth international congress of 
Spoiled chemistry which met in Ne» 
York very recently. 

•M; ( ._F. ( l w i„ W. Allen has hats 
placed in temporary charge of tin- 
drainage work of the I". S. Depart- 
ment <>f Agriculture. 

'K7._\Villiam II. Caldwell h 
been appointed a trustee of the N> * 
Hampshire State College of Agricul- 
ture, and during the last year he I 
served as secretary of the board 
trade of his home city. PCterbo 
N. H. 

*8t. — Charles S. Crocker of PhUft- 
delphia, Fenn.. visib'd Mends 

1 Amherst recently. 
■'.»2.— A daughter, Kathleen Bv 




Conn. Valley SI. R,. Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



n«d only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



bom to Prof, and Mrs. Jewell R. 
Knight of Roona, India on -luiie IS, 
1911 

'«(,{. _Dr. C.eorge F. Curley has 
been re-appointed associate medical 
examiner of the >i\th Worcester dis- 
trict. 

•HI.— Ralph A. Smith is now pro- 

Feasor of plant pathology uf thel'ni- 

ramityoi California. IL' has been 
granted leave of absence from .Inly 
1, VJ\> to.Inly I, 1918 ami is now in 

Europe. 

'95. — II. I). Hemenway is the au- 
thorof an article on the "People's In- 
stitute of Northampton" in the Aug- 
ust number of W'tshrn X<ir Kttfjkmd I. 

';t7.— Prof. Charles A. Pn t e r i <>f 

thiseollege attemled the international 
congress of applied chemistry held 
in New York rei-ently. 

•«.i;i._Ca|,t. William IL Arin- 
Htrong, I . S. Army, until recently 
on duty at the Army War college. 
Wellington. I). C, is now stationed 
at Fort Leayenwoilh. Kan-. 

•hi.- The Bhstea thniay Qtobt 

for .Inly 1 ith containcl an Interesting 

interview with Onoffge I'-- * >'!learii 
on the subject of forestry. 

•oo. — John J. QnrJn e r , who spenl 

the slimmer in Amherst, left t<»N\n 
early in September to take up hi- 
aofffe in the horticultural department 
of the uuiversity of Illinois. 

im;.— Alexandci II. If. W<xmI has 
removed to Rn»ekU>n when- he has 
purchased a large estate. He still 
retains his farm at Huston Furnace. 

, |.A>«. "I P.MiT. 
A Class letter will be published 
about Oct. I, Itltt and material for 
it should be in the secretary's hands 
before that date. All ftirmer inein- 
han of the class are ie M m-te.| to 
contribute, (linton King, secretary. 

<; Bannon st.. Roston. 

• ( i7. — Announcement is made of the 
birth of a son. Jerome llosinei . to 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph .1. Watts of Am- 
herst, on July 21. IMS. 

07. — Jasper F. F.astman was mar- 
ried to Miss Mildred A. Chmton on 
August 2*2 at Trinity church in Ron- 
ton. Ili.v will reside at Mori isville, 

N. Y. 

•08. — Carlton Rate- -pent the sum- 
mer in Amher-t. 

•(IM. — II. K. Ilaye- i- one «.f the 
authors of bulletin 21:1. bureau of 
plant industry of the !'. B. depart- 
ment of agriculture entitled : "He- 
terozygosis in Hyolution and Plant 
Breeding." 

'(»;». —Joseph T. Oliver is now in- 
structor in agrieulture in Moravia 
high school. Moravia. N. Y. Since 
entering upon his new position he 
has been elected secretary and treas- 
urer of the Association of New York 
Agricultural Principals and Teachers. 

'11.— Miss Certrude K. Dunn, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Dunn, was married to Arthur II. 
Sharpe at her home in Fonthill. 
Ontario, on Sept. 11, IMt. 



RESERVED FOR VELVET 



Highest Grade Roses 

We arc offering to our lo< al patrons, selection from our large 
HOC* of finest Roma, • -|-«< ially grown for the Nkw York and In 
llOWKk Makkkis. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amherst, 196-R. 
Northampton, 660. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMEHRST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



School ana College Photographers 



♦ • 




I r%r*AI IY- 5a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

LOCALLY. 5 ftnd South Ha(lcyt Mas9 . 

M mm Officf • These Studios offer t* bent skilled 

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.r*6.. et x Hrnarlwav artists and mosccompieie 

,546-1548 Broadway, efl< ipment obtainable 

New York City er l'"*' 






1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 17, 1912. 



TENNIS RACKETS 



Wright & Ditson's, Spalding's, Slazenger's 

— Priced from - — 

$9.50 to $1.50 



... Tennis Balls ... 
Rackets Rcstrung 



DEUELS 

DRUG STORE 



AiMliurat, Mt*mm. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Knvdopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of l.ngraved Invita- 
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Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 




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BOSTON 



AMHERST 

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High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 

Shirts, - - - 10-15C 

Collars, .... 2c 

Cuffs, - - - ac 

Plain wash, - - 40c per doz. 

Same, rough dry, - - 25c per doz. 

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Francis S. Madison, agent for 1915 and 

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COLLIGE SHOEMAKER 

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Fine Rt fairing a Specialty 

Cuitom Work 

Holland's Blocs, Phoenix Row 




Massachusetts Agricultural College 



rORJY=SIXTM YEAR 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Board, 

Tin- College Si-uMto, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Assoniatfon, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tenuis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. ('. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle club, 

R< >ister Doisters 



(ieorge H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. It. Criggs, Piesident 

J. W. Covill. Manager 

L. Edgar Smith, Man 

E. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little. Manager 

c. Boksiaail, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

K. 8. Clark, Jr., Manage! 

L. Q. Da\ ies. P fes i dsnl 

.1. L. Mayer. Piesident 

W. S. Little. President 

.1. I>. French, Manager 

A. F. McDoiigall. President 

G. W. Flls. Sccrct.iiv 

Harold F. .Jones, Manager 



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Mo*t liberal ticket system In town 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



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Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 



Springfield Republican 

A NKWSIWPEK III A I I.IU < A I I 

The Republican gives the best report 
Agricultural College and Amherst 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %*. Weekly, 1 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 24, 1912. 



No. 2 



SIX MAN PULL 

An Easy Victory for Sophs. Fourteen 
Feet of Rope Pulled in 

The annual six -man rope pull 
between the freshman :tn<l sophomore 
classes took place Saturday after- 
noon just prior to the Rhode Islaml 
irmiie. (Mils appeared aliout e\en 
up to the time referee Chapman fired 
the shot. After that the sophomores 
were the only favorites, sinee they 
had it all their own way. They "got 
the drop" on the freshmen and pro- 
ceeded to pull in rope until exactly 
fourteen feet had crossed the line. 
The freshmen seemed to have trouble 
with the cleats in their shoes, several 
of them finding it impossible to get 
a foothold. This necessarily made 
the contest rather one-sided. The 
11115 team consisted of the following 
men : Lincoln, Fuller, Montague, 
Jordan (capt.), Little ami Hyde. 
On the freshman team were Jerome, 
*v hlotterbeck. IMaisted (capt.), Bis- 
liee, Duuforth and Verlieck. Profes- 
sor Hicks was the timer. 



KEYNOTE FOR YEAR 

Sounded by President Butterfleld at 
Wednesday Assembly. 



FACULTY CHANGES 

Many Promotions and Additions in 
the Roll of Instructors. 



A VICTORY FOR RHODE ISLAND 



DRAMATICS 

Thursday evening at 8 o'clock the 
Roister Doisters will bold a maeliug 
in the chapel at which all members 
sud those interested in dramatics are 
> xpeeted to attend. Kvery man who 
has had any experience or who has 
any ability along these lines should 
he present. At this meeting prepa- 
lations for the assignment by com- 
petition of the various roles of the 
play "The Bachelor's Honeymoon" 
which has lieen chosen for presenta- 
tion this year will l»e made; the 
linal assignment of roles to be made 
" by a committee of the faculty from 
the Knglish department. 

Dramatics offers an excellent 
1 hancc, for every man so inclined, to 
partake in one of the college's leading 
activities. Three years ago there 
was no regularly organized dramatic 
society at this college. Today the 
Uoitser Doisters stands among our 
■ollege organizations as one of the 
most active of them all. 

The coming season promises to be 
the best ever. The annual trip 
through New York and New Jersey 
will take place immediately after 
< hristmas and will occupy ten days, 
nine performances being given. 

The schedule of dates will also 
Delude several short trips in this 
mmediate vicinity and a trip to the 
asttrn part of the state. 

It is also announced at this time 
hat candidates for the assistant 
managership of the Roister Doisters 
ill hand in their names to the man- 
gar, Remember, Thursday evening. 
oflM out and give yourself a chance 
> make good. 

H. F. Jones, Manager. 



At the first regular assembly of the 
college year held in the chapel last 
Wednesday. President Buttcriield, 
in accordance with custom sounded 
the keynote or watch-word for the 
activities of the coming year in a 
talk on "tjuality. " 

"I sometimes think, "said the pres- 
ident in part, "that here in America 
we are a little bit apt to estimate the 
worth of a thing by its size and not 
its quality. We like to boast of our 
great industries, our bill buildings, 
our monstrous fortunes, the vast 
extent of our country itself and its 
great institutions. This worship of 
size extends somewhat to our educa- 
tional world. We speak of the 
'great universities' ranking them as 
such by the number of students they 
have in attendance- Size is a fine 
thing but there is danger in estima- 
ting the worth of a college by size 
alone Here at Massachusetts agri- 
cultural college we are apt to -pay 
too much attention to this. It is an 
encouraging sign that this year we 
will graduate as many men as we 
had in the whole college in 1H9H. 
(Quality, however, and not quantity 
spells success in the end. We are 
located in a regular nest of New 
Kngland colleges and high grade 
work is the spirit of New Kngland 
college life. Let us keep up to and 
above the standard. Our real com- 
petitors, however, are the agricul- 
tural colleges of the middle West. 
Kach year we turn out an increasing 
numlier of men and they will have 
to meet the competition of men from 
these colleges. Quality spells suc- 
cess and only the liest men are suc- 
cessful. Let us resolve, then, that 
this year our motto shall be 'Quality' 

quality in scholarship, athletics, 

and all college activities. Then will 
our college take the place she is 
entitled to in the ranks of great col- 
leges and universities." 



Football Team Goes to Defeat 
Fought Game. 



in Hard 



ALUMNI MADE POINT PLAIN 

The Sk.nai.'s comment shortly 
before commencement upon the fail- 
ure of the JRmj York Time* to print 
news from the agricultural colleges, 
and especially from M. A. C, aroused 
the alumni, (iraduates called the 
attention of the Time* to the situa- 
tion and to the importance of our 
college in scientific education, and as 
• a result the Time* printed a special 
I article on its college page, embody- 
ing President Butterfield's views on 
the purpose of agricultural college 
education. The article was accom- 
panied with several good pictures of 
campus scenes. 



The trustees of the college at 
their annual commencement meeting 
in June, created several new positions 
in the college and elected men lot 
nearly all of these positions. 

As announced last spring Dr. 
Charles K. Marshall becomes this fall 
director of the graduate school and 
professor of microbiology. Dr. Mai- 
shall has an enviable reputation as a 
scientist and ranks with the foremost 
bacteriologists in the country. He 
graduated from the l'n\ .1 sity of 
Michigan iu lH«. r » anil comes here 
direct from work at the Michigan 
agricultural college. 

The resignation of Prof. F. F. 
Moon of the forestry department was 
accepted, and Prof. William D.Clark 
was elected to succeed him. Professor 
Clark was l>orn in New Jersey, and 
has had experience iu many parts of 
the Tinted States, including the for- 
ests of Porto Rico. Texas and the 
Rocky Mountain states. He is a 
graduate of Phillips Andover acad- 
emy, of Yale university classical 
course, ,ind of the Yale forestry 
school. For three years he has been 
eonneeted with the school of forestry 
in Pennsylvania stab" college, and 
during I large part of that time has 
assumed the chief responsibility la 
his department. He has had 
extended experience in learning ami 
administrative work as well as in 
practical forestry. 

The chemical department of the 
College has insen further strenthened 
by the election of Dr. Truest Ander- 
son of the University of Chicago as 
assistant professor of general and 
physical chemistry. Dr. Anderson 
received the degree of H. A. from 
Trinity college. Texas. In 190.*!, M 
was graduated from the University 
of Texas with the degree of B. Sc, 
and two years later, as a result of 
further study, received the degree of 
M.Sc He entered the University of 
Chicago as an advanced student iu 
the autumn of 1906 nnd has pursued 
bis studies there every quarter since. 
In the spring of 1907 he was made 
assistant in chemistry, ami has lately 
been offered an instructorship in gen- 
eral chemistry. He was given the 
degree of Ph. D. in the summer of 
1909, the subject of his thesis being 
••'The Action of Fehling's Solution 
on Galactose." Since 1909, Dr. 
Anderson has been research assist- 
ant to Professor Nef , the head of the 
chemical department of the Univer- 
sity of Chicage. Dr. Anderson 
comes to M. A. C. to assist in the 



1 Contlnuad on IMC* 51 



'The Massachusetts -Aggies" lost 
the first football game of the season 
on the campus Saturday afternoon, 
Rhode Island State winning in 
a grueling contest by a 7 to score. 
The visitors got the jump on the 
Massachusetts men in tbe first period 
and pushed the ball over after a se- 
ries of end runs which the "Aggie" 
defense was slow in staving <>""• 
Both teams showed lack of condition 
hut the play was fast and furious 
nevertheless. Rhode Island showed 
i.et greatest strength during the early 
stages of the game, her interference 
being especially strong. As the game 
progressed, however, Massachusetts 
began to find herself and in the last 
period the visitois had the ball for 
onlv MM down. 

Captain Sullivan was the mainsti.y 
of the Rhode Island team. Hiadnsh- 
ing end runs, aided by splendid inter- 
ference on the part of his team mutes, 
produced the only score of the game 
in short order, lie kicked a goal a 
minute later from a diflicult angle. 
Twice hi« team brought him MMI 
enough to the post for an attempt at 
a goal from the field. 'The first try 
hit the goal post but the second went 

wide. 

The "Aggies" were slow in finding 
themselves. There was no one M 
bN«fe up the interference ami many 
tackles were missed in the first 
|,.ii«Hl. The backlield seemed b» 
| i:lV e trouble with the signals and 
fumbling was much too frequent. 
( oiisidering. however, that it was tin 
tirat game and practically the first 
scrimmage, the team showed excellent 
possibilities. 

'The work of the veterans was of 
high grade. Kdgcrton played a dash- 
ing game at left end and continually 
threw his man for I heavy loss. 
Captain Samson and Baker opened 
up large holes in the line which 
Graves found to good advantage, 
especially in the last perusl. Smith 
ran the team well at quarter during 
the first half and Gore showed his 
usual aggressiveness in tin second. 
O'Hrien injured his left shoulder in 
the first period and Mullins, the 
freshman who took his place, did 
some good work. Nissen, Howe and 
Craves were most in evidence in the 
last period when they were carrying 
the ball continually for large gains. 
Hhode Island had I 'lose call in 
the last period. Massachusetts 
started with the ball in her posses- 
ion on her own 2<> yard line. The 
backs took turns in carrying it through 
the line for steady gains and finally 












The College Signal, Tuesday, September 24, 1912. 



ii u.is lirst down and i>ut four yards 
to go for ■ touchdown. The visitors 
fought desperately and with the help 
of their strong secondanf defense 
succeeded in holding for downs, t li«- 
ball going into their possession <»n 
their own one yard line. Captain 
Sullivan immediately punted to mid* 
Held end again ML \ C took up the 
stead? march to the goal lint-. Time 
ended the play with the ball once 

more on the one v;ml line just an ft 

touchdown seemed inevitable. 

Tin 1 game in detail : 

Rhode Island Iviike.l to O'lhicn 
who tan the ball back to the 36-yard 
line. Nissan gained two yards ami 
Smith punted to Sullivan who brought 
it ha«-U to the center of tin- Raid. 
sin-twin and Price made a Brat down 
in two rushes. Sullivan went round 
the end for 15 yaids. Newton took 

a hand in carrying Ihi' ball and Sulli- 
van broke free from the crowd to he 
brought down l>\ Smith K> yards. 
from tin' lin«'. Kbvrwin added three 




a drop kick hut the hull hit the post 
and bounded away. M. A. C. put 
the hall in play on the M yard line 
Nissan was thrown for a small loss. 
Howe made live and a free fiimhle 
followed. M. A. C. recovering. The 
visitors were penalised for offside 
play. Nisscn and Smith made it 
lirst down. Howe and (!ra\o 
couldn't gain so Smith punted to 
Rhode Island's 16 yard line just as 

time was called. 

Massachusetts came back strong 
in the second half. Dole kicked to 
the visitors on their 2;'> yard line. 
Rhode island was penalized for 
holding. Kdgerton threw Sullivan 
for a lo>s. and a punt followed, 
(■ore receiving on his .'»."» yard line. 
Howe gained sc\en yards in two 
rushes, hut the hall went to the 
opponents on an illegal puss. After 
SOTOral abort rushes Sullivan kicked 
to < ;.ne. Rhode Island held strongly 

and Graves punted. M. A. ('. suf- 
fered a penalty for being offside, and 
the rWtorS worked the hall to the 
:;<» yard line for a lirst down. S11I- 
livan tried the ends again without 
success and then tiied a second drop 
w Inch went w nle. 

••Aggie" brought the hall out for 
the last quarter and. starting 011 the 
10 vard line, carried the l.all without 
a hltcfa down the Held only to he 
held on the otic yard line and sent 
hack to do the trick all OVSf again 
when time cut short the game and 
prevented a probable score. The 
lineup : 



K. I. s 

Hanlie, le 

linden. It 

Aidfid. CaktweO, i&j 

Davis, c 

Webster, rg 

.1111. rt 
Lewis, re 

Sullivan (capt), qb 
Newton, Ihb 
Pi iie. rlib 



M. A. ( . 

re, O'Brien, Mullins 

rt, Dole 

rg, Eisenhaure 

c, Maker 

In. (.rithn 

It, Samson (rapt) 

le, Kdgerton 

qb, Smith, (iore 

rhb, Nissen, Clegg 

Ihi). Howe 

fb. <irave» 



Coach Bkidbs 

and then Sullivan circled left end for 
a touchdown, kicking the goal. 
Rhode Island kicked to Mullins who 
fumbled but recovered on his own 
•">.'» yard line. A forward pass failed. 
Nissan gained Bve yards and the 
quarter ended. 

Smith punted to Sullivan on his 
.'iO yard line. Kdgerton threw the 
visiting captain for a lost on the next 
play and Sullisan punted to Smith 
who fumbled and lost the ball. After 
three rushes had failed to gain the 
required distance Sullivan attempted 



Sherwin, fb 

Score— Rhode Island State college 7, 
Massachusetts o Touchdown — Sulli- 
v.m. (loal from touchdown Sullivan. 
Krfcree Hubbard of Amherst. Um- 
pire -Foley. Head linesman — Chap- 
man. Time— eight and seven-minute 
periods. 

HOCKEY PLANS 

Manager \V S. Kittle of the 
hockey team has already nearly com- 
pleted plans for the coming winter 
w Inch it is thought will be the most suc- 
cessful one the M. A. ('. seven has 
yet had. A schedule has been 
arranged, and although not yet rati- 
fied by the athletic board, it will 
include the following colleges: 
Amherst. Trinity. Yale, Cornell, 
Dartmouth. M. 1. T.. \i. V. I.. West 
Point, Springfield college and 
Williams. 

( lass schedules as arranged for 
this semester will make it practically 
impossible for the team to hold any 
satisfactory afternoon practices. 
Plans are being made to light the 
rink with six large incandescent 
lights so that plenty of practice may 



UP-TO-DATE 



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DENTAL ROOM! 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
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The Prospect House 



PERRY'S 



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The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. EI. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

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The best place in town to buy Drugs, Chemicals, Patent 
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The College Signal, Tuesday . September 24. *9 



12. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



)'OU WILL hIND 
A FULL LINE 




& Miles 



TOBACCO 






The College Drug Store 



be hail evenings. Night practice will 
also ari-iistoin the team to conditions 

which are most *icnci:illy nut with on 
rinks away from home. 

Eour men have heeii lost by gradu- 
ation from last year's fast team ; 

Captain ftakfcam, SauctBary, Acker- 

„ 1!m and Walker. Woolhy is also 
lost to the team aa he has decided to 
>tay out of college for a year, lie 
would haw Keen kept from playing 
thi> year ha<l he returned, for he 
broke his leg late in the summer 
M:u Donald who dropped out of col- 
lege la>t year has returned hut will 
be ineligible until the second 
>rim>ter. 

Perhaps the greeted lorn to the 

team i> Ackermati who MeOSSsfnliV 
defended "Aggie's" goal for four 
years. Woolley was one of the fast- 
I -t and hardest players who STSt 
donned skates for M A. C. l'eek- 
ham and Sanctuary are also hard 
men to replace, as their four years' 
experience and their steady playing 
will he missed. 

The varsity men now in college are 
Captain Hutchinson 1 I. Little '1$, 
Jones II and Needham'M. With 
oiilv four II NT men remaining there 
will he need of all the material that 
the freshman class ean offer. There 
ia a strong nucleus remaining from 
UmM seaeoa'l crack team ami with the 
addition of material from the enter- 
ing class there is evei y prospect of 
equalling the great record made by 
the team last year. 




y. 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, September 24, 191s. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 241 »9 ,a - 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

K. II.VANZWAI.KNUlIRG'ij.Kditor in-Chief 
CHESTER K.WIIKKI.KR'i4.ManaKin K Editor 
OSCAR G.ANDER«ON 'l* Assistant Kditi.r 
FREDERICK D.ORIGGS'i), Athl«tic Editor 
S. MILLER JORDAN '13, Athletic Editor 

HARRY W. All. EN '13, Alumni Editor 

STUART B. FOS1 IK 'u. Department Editor 
ERVINI P. J'AKKKR'13. Alumni Editor 

J. ALHEKT PRICE '15. Associate Editor 

EI. BERT F. MOORE'is. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

GEORGE ZABRIKKIE. ad. '13. Bus. Manager 
ERNESTS. CI.ARK.IR 'i4.Asst.Bus.Manager 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Asst. Adv Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH '1$. Circulation 



Subscription $1 50 per vear. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 

EnlefM as s*cofwj-«~ , tM fnatt#r at tn# MSsMSaH 
Peat Offtoe. 

Vol. XXIII. Tuksijay, Sept. 14. No. a 

Thk football game with Rhode 
Inland He twills J. while unfortunate 
and unsatisfactory in its outcome, as 
viewed bj the friends of M. A. C, 
was not without its lesson and value. 
It showed the team just what powers 
it had, and the strong game played 
in the last half should he most en- 
couraging to the x|ii:id. I'nder a 
new coaching system the team here- 
tofore did not know just where it 
stood, and it was with this feeling of 
uncertainty that it played the early 
periods of the game. The last 
period disclosed the strength of the 
team, and the varsity will enter its 
remaining games with self-confidence 
sad a knowledge of its true strength. 
Saturday's game will prove to be a 
|KM>r indicator of the rest of the sea- 
son's record. 



In common with sister New Eng- 
land colleges. M. A. C. has her own 
peculiar traditions and customs. 
Among these customs is one that has 
come down to the present day with 
the approval of class after class upon 
it — the greeting of faculty and sen- 
iors by freshmen with the military 
salute The custom is not a degrad- 
ing one ; HiMOBOSl no special hard- 
ship upon the freshmen. It signifies 
that the new comers, the beginners, 
are recognizing their collegiate elders 
with a fitting mark of respect, 
lar better is it, however, that the 
custom should be ended by senate 
action than that it should continue as 
at present. There is hardly a pre- 
tense, on the part of a majority of 
the freshman class, of giving the 
salute to seniors. The few who do 
salute, do so in such a slovenly, 
hang-dog manner that it hardly war- 
rants the name. The excuse of 
ignorance no longer holds good ; if a 
freshman does not know the mem- 
bers of the senior class let him 
dilute on general principles: if it is 
not a senior whom he has saluted, 
the salute will not be returned. 
There are two courses open — let the 



sophomores enforce the saluting rule 
rigidly, or let the senate abolish the 
custom. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Forty men came out Wednesday 
evening in answer to the call for can- 
didates for the Glee Club. 

Needless to say the change at the 
Dining Hall from the "a la carte" to 
the "Table d'Hotc'" basis will be 
appreciated. 

A pretty small percentage of the 
fellows "fussed" the game Saturday. 
It is hoped that the next home game 
will he featured by more of a 
••Ladies' Day." 

President and Mrs. ButterhYld. 
assisted by MRSbsfi of the faculty 
and their wives and the college sen- 
ate, received the freshman class at 
the president's house Saturday 
evening. 

Perhaps the tug-of-war Saturday 
would not have been so one-sided if 
the sophomores had not taken 
advantage of the error which gave 
them >ome of the sIkk-h belonging to 
men on the freshman team. 

Moat of the upper classmen jour- 
neyed to the campus at the other end 
of the town Saturday evening to wit- 
ness one of the most exciting flag 
rushes for many years, at which the 
sophomore class were the victors. 

The freshmen "slip|M a d one over" 
on the sophomore*, early Montlay 
morning when they had their picture 
taken 011 the chapel steps. Several 
sophomores were present but for 
obvious reasons were detained inside 
the chapel. 

At a recent meeting the freshmen 
elected their olllcers for the first 
semester. They are C. II. Fernald, 
-'ml, president ; F. A. Anderson, 
vice-president; K.K.Wheeler, sec- 
retary ; ('. B. Francis, treasurer. ('. 
S. Hager. class captain. 

At a Signal Board meeting held 
Thursday night, George B. Donnell 
'15 was unanimously elected to the 
vacancy in the editorial department 
caused by the failure of K. F. Moore 
to return to college. Donnell was 
second man in the competition held 
last spring. 

A good bunch of candidates 
reported for cross country running to 
Assistant Manager Kdwards, the 
Freshman class being very well rep- 
resented. This showing gives good 
promise for a fine cross country team 
to meet Tufts and the University of 
Vermont, also for an exciting inter- 
class run. 



Change of Location 



CROSS COUNTRY 

The outlook for cross county is 
very promising, especially from the 
incoming class. With the interclass 
cross-country coming Oct. 5th and 
the dual run with I'niversity of Ver- 
mont a lot of enthusiasm should be 
aroused. Over 20 men are out from 
the freshman class including some 
very good material. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Milt St., Northampton 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— OF — 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell'u 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOV TONIC 



Eld ridge '14 



Kendall '16 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



C*rptn-tcr & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH BlocK, Amherst 

H. M. Rogers, '15, Agent. 

87 Pleasant St., Studio Phone 303-J. 



FACULTY CHANGES 

[Continued from first pag«l 



undergraduate courses in general 
chemistry, to develop courses in 
physical chi'iniHtry and also to co- 
operate in the establishment of 
advanced courses in clu-mistrv as 
applied to agricultural problems. 

Samuel Coons was elected in- 
structor in dairying. Mr. Coous 
lias had much experience in his line 
of work, having spent II years in 
commercial work as buttermaker 
and manager of creameries in New 
York state. He conies to the college 
from Prattsville. N. Y.. where he 
has been handling ■ large commer- 
cial butter plant. Mr. Coons spent 
the winter of IMS as instructor in 
huttermaking at the college. 

W. W. Chenoweth was elected 
instructor in pomology to take the 
place of Ralph W. Kits, who will in 
the fall be transferred to work in 
pomology in the extension service. 
Mr. Chenoweth is a graduate of the 
college of agriculture. I'niversity of 
Missouri, in the class of 1919. He 
took his H. A. and M. Sc. degrees 
MBS years ago. and t:uight science 
for several years, in which wcupu- 
tion he was eminently successful. 
lie then decided to go into horticul- 
tural work and has just completed 
liia course. Mr. Chenoweth comes 
highly recommended by the author- 
ities of the I'uiveisity of Missouri. 

E. L Morgan was elected to a 
position in the extension service. 
which involves work regarded as 
rather unique. His duties will be to 
investigate economic, educational and 
social conditions in communities 
eaten applj for his services, and 
will attempt after careful study of 
th. situation, to BUggest ways of 
ro-oprration for rural l»etteruient. 
Mr. Morgan seems to be particularly 
w. 11 equipped to undertake this sort 
of work. He attended McK.ndree 
(ollege, graduating from that institu- 
tion in 11*04 with the degree of 
bachelor of Arts. For six years sub- 
■sqeeat to that time he was engaged 
in county Y. M. C. A. work in Illi- 
nois and Kansas. During the last 
t wo years he has been attending the 
I'niversity of Wisconsin as a gra-lu- 
Sta student, making a special study 
there of agricultural economics and 
rural sociology. 

Arthur Dailcy was elected super- 
ior of corres|>ondenee courses to 
take the place of Albert .Jenks. who 
igned from that position in the 
ly spring. Mr. Dailey is a gradn- 
of the I Diversity of Vermont, 
SBd has supplemented his college 
ining with a business course. 
Mr. W. A. Turner and Mr. Harold 
v Adams have resigned as assistants 
hemistry. and Mr. Robert II. 
1 :ue, a graduate of Tufts college 
ii 1919, has been elected to till one 
hese vacancies. The work of 
1 other assistant will be carried by 
! graduate assistants to be ap- 
ed later. 



Mr. Henry E. Smith has been ap- 
pointed SSsistsnt professor in Kng- 
lish. This is a new position recently 
created by the trustees and aSOSSSl- 

tated by the increased number of 
students attending the college. Mr. 
Smith received his advanced train- 
ing at the Iniveisity of Chicago and 
at Yale university. He has had a 

wide experience as 1 teacher , having 

served on the faculty of the North 
Dakota agricultural college. the 
Washington state normal school. 
Tabor college. Iowa, and Westmin- 
ster college. 

The resignation of Mr. Howard 
DeF. Widger as instructor in Eng- 
lish and public speaking was received 
in duly. His successor will be Mr. 
Walter E Prince, who for sewn 
ream has held a similar position at 
the Iniveisity of Maine. Mi. 
Prince graduated from Brown uni- 
versitv in 1904 and the following 
year received the degree of M. A. 
from the same institution. 

During the past year there bat 
Keen such a demand 011 the part of 
the students for instruction in poul- 
try husbandry :nnl so milch demand 
also for extension work in poultry 
husbandry that the trustees ha\e felt 
obliged to add another iiistrmtor in 
that department. The person -<■- 
lected for this work is Mr. A. A. 
Brown. He graduated from the Ini- 
rSf alty <»f WlsOOUeis in \'.*\'2. and 
comes to Massachusetts highly rec- 
ommended by his formei instructor-. 
Mr. E. M. McDonald has accepted 
a position as instructor in agronomy. 
This is a new position recently ere 
atcd by the trustees, and is made 
necessary by the increased number 
of students attending the institution. 
Mr. McDonald graduated from the 
Cniversity of Illinois in 1910. Since 
that time he has been employed at 
that university as instructor and ex- 
periment station worker. Mr. Mc- 
Donald also has a normal school 
training and limited experience as a 
teacher. 

Mr. Orion A. Morton has been 
elected to the vacancy in the depart- 
11 cnt of agricultural education occa- 
sioned bjf the resignation of Floyd 
R. Jenks. Professor Morton'* work 
will be in connection with the exten- 
sion service. The extension work of 
the department <>f agricultural edu- 
cation has l»een along the lines of 
agricultural clubs among the children 
and youth of the state. This work 
will be in the immediate charge of 
Professor Morton. 

Herbert . I. Raker, who has been 
employed during the past year as 
assistant in agronomy and as secre- 
tary to the director of the experi- 
ment station, will undertake co-oper- 
ative work in farm management 
under the joint direction of the col- 
lege and the United states depart* 

incut of agriculture. 

The following promotions were 
made of the present members of the 
faculty : 

Edward M. Lewis, formerly assist- 



NOT TWINS 

At M. A. C. you will learn among other things, 
something about plant food, both scientific and practical. 
Science and practice o<> well together but tin y arc not 
twins. Science for instance c an tench )< u bow to pro- 
duce an excellent apple pic-, bill for many reasons there 

are those who prefer "the kind that mother used to make" 

in the old home kitchen. 

The science of fertilizers has to do with certain things ap- 
plied in certain ways, under certain conditions. In at tual practice 
the farmer lias to deal with uncertain conditions ihe weather, Ins 
markets, his labor— and that la where our lliuh Grade Special 
Complete and Available Fertilizers help him, (or they «iv« him 
the best plant food all ready to use. 

Stuiiv the plant Jooti pioblem. 
Send for our treatise " Plant Food." containing no advertising. 

BOWKER FERfiEiZER COMPANY 

43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass. 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 






KuppcnheimiTS 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING Ik SPECIALTY 




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MEN'S STORE 

M Hilary Tailors, - liroocks 
Makes. Agents for Mills. 
\l.iy.tson Co. London Vests 

KEISER CRAVATS 

Dobbs & Co., Krofut & Knapp Hats 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR 6. HABERDASHER 

Amherst Store- 
Next First Nationil Hank 






.-.•.•.•.•.•.•..• 



The College Signal. Tuesday, September 24, »9 ia - 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 24, 191 2. 



ant dean and assistant pro f ess or of 
literature, to beeome aeeociate titan 
and professor <>f literature. 

Alexander K. Canoe, to beeotns 
seaoeiate professor »»f agricultural 
economics, 

Clarence K. Qotdon, formerly 
assistant professor of aooiogy and 
geology, to lieoouie associate profoe- 
^ ( >i of sootogy :»ii<l geology. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Ui-iiMiiiiiiltH' Wntftt 



Sidney B. Haskell, formerly assist- 
ant professor of agronomy, to 
become tisHoi'iiito profeasor of 
agronomy. 

(ha lies K. Peters, formerly assist- 
ant prof essor of Inorganic and soil 
chemistry, to beeome aasoeiate pro- 
fessor of Inorganic and soil chemistry. 

Prof. B. I'Vancis Howard lias re- 
Mglied as assistant professor of 
chemistry. 



House Next U) Laundry. 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

President and Mrs. K. L. Butter- 
lit Itl held their annual receptloa to 

the rivsliinaii class at their home 

Friday evening. 

In tin- receiving line beside the 
President and Mrs. BntterneW new 
Profeasor and Mrs. P. B-Hssbronek, 

Fan 4 Winier Suits 4 ivircnii KM! £*££ STfiE 

and Proftssor and Mr*. A. a. Mae- 
kiniinif The l'i«>idfiit and mem- 
ben t»r the Benats ners also present. 
Members «»f the anper el aasss ush- 
ered Music was rurnlahed bj the 
College Mandulln <lub. The b ea n 
tit'ul decorations in the bouse note 
in eharge of Prof. R A. White of 
the Ploricultural department. 

Refreahmena were served by 
Profeseorsnd Mrs Hanlironek end 
Mrs. Mackimmie. I> J. liswis served 
l ,11 ii< It in the Pr es idee t's ufltoe. The 
Mandoiiu elnh rendered mani i»«>i>««- 
for pieees from the bakony sbovs 
tin- stairs and later played tor the 
guests t<> sin^. 



New line of samples just rtceiv. il 

Made to Order & Ready to Wear Su.ts 

OVEJti - nmi'U - i"< HO 
PROM 

unlet t .irly sad Rt-i th<- best the ct 

PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mass. 

M B. WMITK I* Af««l 

to A Ilea "*trr«t 



MUSICAL CLUBS 
Answeriug the call for candidates for 
tiie orchestra, glee and m an do l i n 
clubs, tome eighty men turned out 
last Tuesday sight for the Brat 

practice Of these, forty are trying 
for the glee eittb, twenty for the 
orchestra and twenty for the man- 
dolin club. 

Leader Hutchinson of the orchestra 

is looking for several more violinists 
and a pianist, ami the mandolin club is 
in especial need of men playing the 

guitar. Studenta and more especially 
freshmen, having any musical ability 
arc urged t<» conic out for the elubs. 
Men who are BUM to try out for more 
than one branch of the association 
will have incieased ehance of making 
the trips 

An aggressive season is being 
planned by Manager . I. D.French. 
Dates are being booked in towns 
throughout the state and a long trip 
will probably bt scheduled for the 
Kaster recess. 

Director ( ioodwin who st> efllcieuUy 

eoached the clubs last veal will BOt be 
back this season and for the present, 

until a sew director is secured, work 
will continue under the s tudent 

leader-" 

Keheai>als will be held as follows: 
Tuesday 6-&0 r U. Orchestra. 

H-(K) r. m Mandolin Club, 

Wedaendai 740 r. m. Owe Club. 




EASTERN APPLE TROPHY 

to b« awarded at 

THE AMERICAN LAND AND 
IRRIGATION EXPOSITION 

DONATED BT 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Continuing ib policy <A encouraging apple 
growing in the Eaat, Tk* Caa-Martiawr 
Caaaaaay •Her* tk* Mafaificeat Eaitrra 
Apple Traaky (a $750.00 Steriiai SiUer 
Prua Csf> lor thebeat 1 5 boxea ol Eastern 
Grown Apples thown at the American 
Land and Irrigation EapoMlion in 1912. 

Easier* Grawcrt •( Caad Applet tki* 

it Year Oppartaaity ! 
You hare contended that your applet are 
superior to those ol the West here is the 
opportunity ol a lifetime to prove it I 

The 1 5 bo*e» ol apple* lor which the 
COE-MORTIMER cup is o*«red may 
be any 3 varieties, hut there must be not 
lea* than 5 boxe* ol each variety. 

THIS OFFER IS Oft*) TOIflfJ »W» Mpajft in 
N(W (NClftNO MIW TOM W« J JMI. 

aNOilREIMIi TrMITNYMTMfll- 

IIONtO IS HOT INClUOfO IN THF 

COMMTITHM. 

There are no "strings" on this offer. 
The be»t apple* win the cup. whether our 
fertiliser* are u»ed or not. 

No one connected with THE COE- 
MORTIMER COMPANY will have 
anything to do with |udging the apple* or 
awarding the prize. 

|, „ expected that the apple, will I* ,udged by Prof. H. E. Van Dem.n. formerly 
United State* Government Pomologin 

Full information concemng contest, together wrth .core-card and entry blank, gladly *ent 
to every Fruit Grower who request* them. 

Wa honertlv believe that your chance* of winning the cup will be very much better ii 
you ZqZZ TO—. PhosphaU /Wer or £M £ ^^a^JfE 

mow that the apple* that waa the lateraatiaaal Cap. the Gev. Fa*» tap and the 
C^ Paler Shield a. tl\ New England Fruit Shaw i. Oct.ber. 1911. wer. raiaed wtth 
GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER Key-Tree Bra«d. ) 
Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Claaa by Purchaaing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand 
FROM 

The Coe-Mortimer Co., 51 Chambers Street, New York 

Oar Btoklcl. Up la D.le Frwt Sraa-wa with Taaam faatatott r»awSar,"w»a^rtajajrta«>l«l _ 






DKPARlMi NT NcThS 



OAIK1 WG. 

Tin- ann .hirv tthoratory <» Mint 

laboratory :is it h:is been named, for 

funmi lYoidcnt Flint. Im* raoentlj 
bean liafiiJiurl oner to Ih nen ll egs nji the 

contractor. Tin- building is litttatsd 
:il tin' right of Lin- ravine and faces 
toward Fltiaannt nlnisl Cunslraotsd 
of redbrivk and re enf orced uoncirate, 
it prt-wntH :ui attractive sppsafanet 
end is :i vntaable addition to tin- 
«aiii|itn». It i-> :» two an<l oiif-lialf 

started rtmnturs, Ine Hours of which 
an Hii|.[iorir<i with ontsida walls and 
lno mejrs of atanl pieta. Ho wall 
partition is a ■npaoctiaj; partition; 
aenci, if it snonhl becoint- nftfssnn 
to iviniMhl or rhangr the boUdlng in 
anv way. taM partition's can bjg 

icinovcil without Injuring tlwntabil- 

itv of the structure. 

The total cost of the liuihling with 
»M|ui|iuicnt is approximately $M5,000. 
It will bS <lcvotc<l primarily to farm 
ilairving ami market milk, the latter 
including bo t t lin g of milk. Initter- 
Btekiag and eventually the mauufac- 
lure of <-lieese ami ice-cream. The 
e M iiipiiiunt which is now being in- 
stalled is of the very besj ami the 
accommodations of the different la- 
hoiatoiics are such as will amply 
take care of all who elect tic dairy 
courses. Aside fiom the laboratories 
for market milk, separating milk. 
I.utter-muking. cheese-making, ice- 
ereain making ami a laboratory for 

ti,e Babeoek tent. IfcerebsUbo^ratory 

for advanced milk work, l-'iutlier- 
inoic there will eventually l>< a hiun- 



dry and a dairy museum. However, 
these rooms including the checsi 
rooms and part of the Balieoek Lah 
oratory will he used temporarily Si 
recitation rooms. 

The building at the present tim. 
is housing the Division of Agricultur. 
which comprises the division ollicc 
ollice of the poultry, agronomy, ani- 
mal husbandry and dairying depart 
meiits, also Dean Marshall of th. 
Craduatc School. Provision bj 

been made for desks and class room 
for Dr. Came and Professor Kyerl\ 

One interesting feature will be tli 
pasteurizing of all milk used in gft 
dining hall, also the manufacture of 
artificial ice. It is doubtful if am 
agricultural college in the couuti v 
can boast of such a building. 

ALUMNI NOTES. 
'71. — Frank LelVelet Whitm \ 
died at his home in Harvard, on July 
l.'», 1919, where he had spent the 
latter yean of his life as a farmer. 
lie leaves a widow and one son. Ili- 
lam in seriously regretted by all win. 
knew him at college and especially 
by his classmates in '71. He was i 
modest, retiring man. and was al- 
wavs a loyal son of old M. A. C. 

Not bums ItOSnas '"i bean Batted as 

to mourn hiss of a member. Whit- 
ney is the seventh to answer to the sum 
uioiis while twenty-one of the 1'iom.i 
Class yet remain. 

17.— OeOffge A Drew was recently 

elected rkn president of the Green* 

wich Farmer's club of GlUSnoft*. 

Conn He is also serving as | 
<hairnian of the republican town 
coinniittee. 

•<'7._C. F. Palmer has entered 
upon his new position as supervise! 
of agriculture in the Los Angelc- 
city schools Hi- home addn- 
now I99J Pushnell Ave .South Panv 

dens i Gat. 
•<ih. — fatten 8. Baton has been 

noininated for the Assembly bl tin 
progressive party of New York. 

*tl. Pemnul H. Smith has H- 
signed his position as a chemist with 
tan Kurcau of Chemistry. I. B. de« 
partimnt of agriculture to becoim 
chemist ami superiuteiidciit for tin' 

Baker Extract Co., of Springing. 

He entered upon his new position mi 
th.' first of September His new .el- 
dress is 17 Hauiiiont St. 

-00. — lames W. Kellogg was BOT* 
ried to Miss Ruth B. Martin of ll'i- 
risburg. Pa., on Aug. 1 1. Iflat 

'02— Arthur I.. Dacy has 9eM 
ndvaiiced from the position of h 
ciiliurist at the West Virginia Ajm- 
cultural experiment station ■ 
ciatc horticulturalist and SBSO 
professor of horticulture at the 
versity of West Virginia. 

'0-2.— Howard L. Knight bm 
elected treasurer of the Aim 
Home Kcoiiomics Association. 

»0g. A daughter, Marjorie Ad 
was born to Mr. ami Mrs. S. 
Smith on .lune :i, 1919. 



it.' 
ni- 



• ii 

III! 



nV 



•09. — I oh ii J. Gtardner has been 

tr an sf err ed from the New Hampshire 
Agricultural College to the Cni versity 
of Illinois where he is now graduate 
student and an instructor in horti- 
culture. 

HI. — Arthur Lee Peck is now 
leaching landscape gardening and 
loriculture at the Oregon Agricul- 
tural College at Corvallis. Ore. 

HA. ■ ■OeOfgO Willard Patch has 
announced the arrival of George 
Willard, Jr., at his home in Arling- 
ton. 

'(it;.-On duly S9tn a son, .lohn 
Hall, was horn to F. Coville Pray of 
Trinida<l, Cuba. 

•OH.— Herbert K. Hayes of the 
( onnecticut Agricultural expel imeiit 
Station has published twoarticles of 
note on the subject of plant breeding 
eatitted '•Correlation and Inheritance 
in Nicotiaue" ami the •• Inheritance in 
( ..in." 

it'.).— Harold I). Phelps is in QBIIga 
«if the landscape development of a 
large private estate in Victoria. Brit- 
ish Columbia 

(ill. -Oeorge M. Hrown. dr.. i> 
loeatni in Vancouver, Hritish Colum- 

Ma. 

•iih. — Cards are out announcing the 
marriage of .F.lmei F. Hathaway, to 
Miss Kdna Alice Moore, in Water- 
n on the *.»th of October. 



'10.— William A. Leonard is spend- 
■ few days at college. 

'U. — Irving W. Davis is now h 
graduate assistant in the department 
of entomology at college. 

'12.— F. A. Castle has entered the 
employ of II. F. Kelsey. landscape 

gardener, la Salem. 



Note is made of the following chan- 
ges of address among the alumni. 

'It.-..— Palph P. Cay from :•(;;• 
West First St., toSK Fast Front St., 
Plainlield, N. .1. 

'Oi;. — Addison .1. Hastings from 
•_>l>0 Clainnont Ave., to 168 (Iraiit 
Ave., Jersey City, N. .1. 

W.— -Archie A. Hartford. New 
I'.oston, N. IL, principal of high 
school. 

I i. — Kgl.ert (1. Davis from Three 
Pivers to Hampden. 

Ml. — Albert U. .links from Am- 
herst to Turner Hill Farm. Ipswich. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
lural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hill. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main St.. Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



UNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



*d only from l A. M. to 4 A. M. 



MM II I \-l Wl I \ I 

Fred S. Merrill. Manhattan. Kan- 
sms. assistant entomologist. 

Theodore .1. Moreau, American 
Park Builders. Mar.pictte Building. 
Chicago, 111 . city planning. 

Alfred F. Muller. landscape archi- 
tect. 

Harry A. Noyes. Amherst ; gradu- 
ate assistant in chemistry, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural Coll. 

Ceorge B. O'Flynn. 89 Hamilton. 
St.. Worcester. Student at (lark 

University. 

Charles ('. Pearson. Boom 610, 
Hartford Bank Building. Hartford. 
Conn., salesman. 

Curtis Peckham. Worcester. New 
York, teacher. 

William K. Philbrick, Ml.', Stein- 
way Hall, Chicago, III., with den 
.lenscii. landscape :u< hitect. 

John A. Pierpoint. Williamsburg, 
tree expert. 

Robert K. Heed. »<M»* Prairie 
Ave.. (Imago, III., with Swift «fc 
Co , export dept. 

Ran I. Shaw. Ilaiig.ui. Mont., in 
IT. S. Forest r\ Service. 

Benjamin (J. Southwi.k. Amherst 
secretary to the director of the 
experiment station. 

Herbert .1. Stack. Wallingford. 
Conn., submaster of Wallingford 
high school. 

Daniel G. Tower. Amherst, grad- 
uate student in entomology. 

Roger A. Warner. Sunderland, 
fanner. 

William.!. Weaver, Highland, N. 
Y., Teach** Of Agriculture. High- 
land high school. 

Kmory B. Wilbur, • Turner Hill 
Farm, Ipswich. Agriculturist. 

Bafts L Wilde. State College, Pa., 
a-sistant in landscape gardening. 

Silas Williams. 71 Monroe, St.. 
Chicopee Falls, with Stevens-Dui- 
yes Co. 

Howard H. Wood. Cherry Hill 
Farm, Beverly, assistant manager on 
certified milk farm. 






RESERVED FOR VELVET 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our huge 
Mo, k of finest Roses. . s|>c< idly grown for the \i w York and Bomon 

Pumas Ma kkk is. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEY, MASS- 
TELEPHONES. 

Anther at. 196-R. 
Northampton. bbO. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



School and College Pbotosrapixrs . . . 




LOCALLK; 5 a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

Main Office : These Studios offer the best skilled 

1546-1548 Broadway, »'tists »"<* most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable 



4 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 24, 1912. 



TENNIS RACKETS 



Wright & Ditson's, Spalding's, Slazenger's 

— Priced from — 

$9.50 to $1.50 



... Tennis Balls ... 
Rackets Restrung 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



A im-»I. .VI«tM<a. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



FORTY-SIXTH YEAR 

Opened September 11,1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (Juitar Strings 

AM II Kit vr. MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Fnvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 

SAMUEL WARD CO. 

5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone $0-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
« Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS. 



WORD'S 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Athletic Hoard, 
The College Senate. 
Pootbftll Assoeiution. 
DaOHhaH Association. 

Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 

Nineteen I lundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen H u n dr e d fourteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference. 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Uitle club, 
Roister Doisters 



Wrlfflat dte r>ltmon 

Catalogues of 
l?*i 11 eflte Wlsxtor OootU 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Collet 
Mudents and Athletes who want the real, superior 
articles for the various sports should insist upon 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson Trade Mark. 



QnOffS II- Chapman, Secretary 

V. B. (Iriggs, Piesidcnt 

.1. W. C'ovill. Manager 

L. Kdgar Smith, Manager 

E. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, Manager 

C. Bokeland, Manager 

(). C Anderson, Manager 

E. S. (lark, dr., Manager 

L. Q. Davies, President 

.1. L. Mayer. President 

W. S. Little, President 

.). 1). French. Manager 

A. F. McDougall, President 

<;. W. Ells, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones. Manager 



Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

Ditson Goods are the Standard hi 
all sports 
%V**iOHT «V OITSION 

U4 Washington St.. Bostoa, Mas*. 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 

Wright ft 




IO-15C 

ac 
40c per doz. 
25c per doz. 



Shirts, 
( ollars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 

Ralph Horden, agent. 
E. C. Edwards, agent. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 
85 Pleasant St. 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

o.ii. k. «i ati-vIc*. B*at Work, Lo*r»t I'rlrr 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, (ients' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' hue linen suits a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



TaL No. MM 



CARS 



Leave AOUIK COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see our assort 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN ft DYER, Props. 



JACKSON & CUTLEX 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till n o'clock EVERY night 

< or ii. i Amity sail I'loaaaut MtrrrU 



If you want to he 

sOI.ll> WITH TMK CTJIKI.H 

you must have your clothes presied anil cleaned 

AT EPSTEINS 

11 Amity St. Maroon Store 

I'reanlng nn.l Cleaning a specialty 

Most liberal ticket system In town 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST lor AQXHE COL- 
LE0Eat7 and 37 mint, past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car» at Reasonable Rates 



AMHIRST & SUNOIRUNO ST. RY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1404-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1814 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATF 

The Republican gives the best report f 

Agricultural College and Amherst 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Daily, $S. Sunday, t2. M 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VolIXXHI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October i, 1912. 



No. 3 



_r 1 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Addressed by Hoo. James Logan, 
Former Mayor of Worcester. 

Hon. James Logan of Worcester, for- 
merly mayor of the city, addressed the 
Wednesday assembly. In introduc- 
ing Mr. Logan, President Butterfield 
said that the speaker was a man who 
bad always lived up to the higli<st 
ideals both in his public and private 
life. Consequently Mr. Ix>gan's re- 
marks on service and high ideals 
were given special force. He said iu 
part : 

Today we need larger and letter 
trained men than ever before. It is 
difficult to find men who are lenders 
and can carry responsibility. The 
spirit of a single man is often the 
|iivot on which a whole enterprise 
turns. As it is by the work of the 
men in the ranks that great battles 
:ire wou, the trained leader of men 
must think for those under him and 
direct their energies aright. 

The qualification for leadership is 
the ability to select, train, and dii. < t 
men. Tact, courtesy and the good 
will of others are necessary. The 
leaders of the future will l>e men 
with big ideals. 

Now we arc having a great ethical 
and spiritual revival in business and 
iu politics. Standards are higher 
now than ever before. Hut they will 
rise to greater heights. The spirit 
of brotherhood will prevail in the 
-ettling of social questions, (ireat 
nlvances have already been made 
ilong these lines. Rut the young 
men of today still have l»efore them 
the solving of the great industrial 
ami social problems. The watch- 
word of service was sounded two 
thousand years ago. The day is 
'.ming when men will believe Unit 
1 life not full of service is empty. 
Are we willing to pay the price of 
i vice :iik1 have 11 full life ? 



ELIGIBILITY RULE EXPLAINED EXTENSIVE SCHEDULE 



By President Butterfield. An Impor- 
tant Announcement. 



Planned by Dramatic Club. The Play, 
"A Bachelor's Honeymoon." 



FOOTBALL MASS MEETING. 
The first football mass meeting of 
the year was held in chapel Monday 
\<ning. Speeches were made by 
iptain Samson, Coach Brides, 
i'resident Butterfield, Manager 
•>vill and George Chapman 'OH. 
I lie keynote of the majority of the 
I »eeches was that more men should 
practising with the squad. With 
ly enough material for a second 
1 m, the varsity is forced to enter 
weekly games without sufficient 
Use. The coach's stiring speech 
D this point should bring out enough 
tatarinj for three and even four 
ns. The cheering was led by 
tdsall '1.1, aid singing by Griggs 
The. meeting ended with the 
.zing of the college song. 



The following in regard to the 
eligibility rule comes from the Presi- 
dent's office : — 

To Students : During the current 
college year, the following plan will 
l>e followed for the enforcement of 
the eligibility rule : 

I . The Rule : No student who is 
reported to the Dean as below pass- 
ing in more than one semester course 
at any time shall be allowed to con- 
tinue to take part in any of the aetftv* 
Mat as enumerated below ; further, 
if a student is repeating a course he 
must maintain a passing grade in 
said com 

(See pages 8 and I on Rules of Itlt, ) 
Athletics (Varsity and class), 
Football. Basketball, 

Hockev. Tennis, 

Track.' Baseball. 

College Sn.SAI.. 

Index (11114 Jmlejr lioard i> exempt. ) 
Debating Club. 
Musical Organizations : 

(.lee Club, 

( rrchestra, 

Mandolin Club. 
Dramatic (bib 

This rule shall apply to all mem- 
bers of organizations, including man- 
agers, assistant managers, leaders. 
and others. 

2. The Student's Oracle: A stu- 
dent's grade as re|s»rted by his in- 
structor shall be his average seme 
rank in the subject up to the time the 
report is made. 

3. Announcement: The announce- 
ment of a student's standing as it 
affects his relation to student activi- 
ties shall be made from the Dean's 
office on the dates announced below. 

4. Release : The release of a stu- 
deut from the application of the elig- 
ibility rule shall come from the 
Dean's office. The status of I stu- 
ibut as announced at any date shall 
remain as his status until the next 
date for announcement of rank ; even 
if a student should succeed in raising 
lii- rank between announcement 
periods, it cannot affect his relation 
to the eligibility rule. 

i. The Schedule of Rei>orts : 

a. The notices of delinquency or 
reinstatement shall be mailed by the 
■ ban to students affected, on the 
"Dean's Saturday," and shall be 
effect i ve the Monday noon following. 

b. The following is the schedule 
of the "Dean's Saturdays," on which 
announcements concerning eligibility 
rank shall be made to all students : 

October o, 
November 2, 
December 7. 

Yours truly, 
Kkn-ton L. hHaVHU, 

President. 



Jan. 
M 

M 



Manager Jones of the Roister 
Doisters is completing arrangements 
for the following trip to be taken 
during the Christmas recess: 
Dec. 2<i.— Hackeii-a< k. N. J. 
.. 27.— Rutherford, N. Y. 
i. 28.— Richmond Hill, L I. 
m 30.— Monroe. N. Y. 
" 31.— Middlctown. N. Y. 
1. — Bingha niton, N. Y. 
2. — Worcester. N. Y. 
3.— Herkimer. N. Y. 
Besides the trip. productions will be 
gi\en at Ware. Montague. Spring- 
field, Greenfield, Northampton and 
Hi. Holyoke College. 

The first regular meeting of the 
Roister Doisters was held in chapel 
Thursday evening. In answer to 
the call for candidates some thirty- 
five men reported and the pros- 
pects for the coming year's cast 
are better than ever. Parts will be 
Mfjgued Tuesday night, and the Hrst 
ti\out will take place Thursday night 
in ehapel. This year a first and | 
second cast will lie selected, and 
the men who make either cast will lie 
admitted as members of the club. 
The second cast will be tried out M 
some of the local productions in 
order that the men who are unable to 
made the til st cast may have some 
incentive to work on their parts. The 
gold watch fob will however, be 
awarded only to members of the first 

east. 



TIE WITH UNION 

Football Eleven is Unable to Score, but 
Holds New York Team to No Score. 

M. A. 0. encountered I'nioii in a 
no-score game Saturday afternoon at 
Sel.ei.edady. The teams were well 
matched, Inion having an advantage 
in weight which was offset l.v the fast 
playing of the Massachusetts eleveu. 
Only once iu the early part of the 
third patted of piny was there any 
chance of Inion scoring, but the 
Garnet team, after getting the ball 
on Bay State's I -yard line, were 
total back, and lost the ball by at- 
tempting to drop kick for goal. A 
similar opportunity presented iUelf 
to the Massachusetts team toward 
the dose of the game but it was held 
for downs by the I'nion team on the 
latter's 4-yard line. Captain Dewey 
punted the ball out of territory. 
Massachusetts played a fast snappy 
gnat and would undoubtedly have 
Mend in the last quarter had they 
,„,t been penalized ten yards for 

holding. 

(lore and Smith of Massachusetts 
aud (apt. Dewey of Inion were the 
leading ligbts of the game, each l>eing 
in a large measure r espo nsi ble for the 
gains made by the respective side. 
The game in detail. 



FIRST TREK 

On Saturday afternoon, the lirst of 
a aeries of treks was held under Un- 
charge of Mr. C. Robert Duncan and 
Mr. S R. Parsons. The party com- 
posed of students and faculty left the 
eampus on the one o'clock car for 
Pelham. After leaving the car. the 
tramp was begun toward Mt. Lincoln, 
one of the hills upon which a forest 
fire lookout station is maintained. 
The rapid pace of the leaders canned 
the line to string out for a quarter of 
a mile. However the dusty road-. 
the ste.p hills, the hot sun, and the 
sore feet, were forgotten when the 
tired crowd reached the lookout and 
obtained a view of the surrounding 
country. The return to Amherst was 
made on the l-2<> car. This was the 
first of the credit treks which have 
been inaugurated this year by Pro- 
fessor Hicks whereby a man receiv- 
ing two credits may be excused from 
a week of physical education during 
the winter. 

'82.— Burton A. Kinney is treas- 
urer of the Warner Box Co., paper 
package engineers. Boston. 



HRST Ot'AKTK.IC. 
Captain Dewey of the Inion team 
kicked off to M. A. C. Ottl ran the 
ball back ten yards l»cfore being 
t:,eklec|. The ball then changed 
sides repeatedly until Inion was 
ed to punt. Gore receive*! tin- 
ball on Massachusetts . r »-yard line 
tad after an ineffectual line buck. 
smith of M. A. C. carried the ball 
for fifty yards. Bay State was \ 
attend •'. yards for being off side and 
Inion held for clowns. M. A. C. 
punted and in turn held Inion for 
downs. Tin period ended with tin- 
ball in the |M»ssessioii of Union on 
her 40-yard line. 



SECOND yl : A HTK.lt. 

Wood, the Inion fullback, was 
worked in the beginning of the- second 
quarter and made several small gains. 
Captain Dewey tried a quarterback 
run on a fake formation, but was 
slow in getting off, and made only 
three yards. The ball then changed 
sides but Union held for downs and 
Massachusetts was forced to punt. 
Wood of Union received the ball and 
in the course of two plays managed 
to gain two yards. Union in turn 
punted, the ball crossing M. A. C's 
goal line. It was put into play on 
the 25-yard line. 

After several consistent gains, and 
a penalty of five yards, M. A. C. 
kicked. Dewey of Union received 






■ 












The College Signal, Tuesday, October i, 191 a. 



the ball And wus downed in his tracks 
on the Garnet*i lO-yart line. Union 
panted) Mtninfihnmtti fumbled, re- 
oorered :i ti<l retained the ball in the 
middle oi tlu> Held until the whistle 
-•'iinded proclaiming the end of the 
half. 

IIIIUD ^UAHTKK. 

The two critical features occurred 
in the second half. Captain Samson 
kicked Of t*» Davis of Union who 
ran live yardf until downed by Gore. 
M. A. ('. Iield Union for downs and 
in the resulting punt, (lore fumbled 
and Starliuck of Union covered 
Hie hall on Massachusetts 8-vard 
line. 1'nion tried an unsuccessful 
drop kick for goal. M. A. C. put 
tbe liall into plav M their twenty- 
yard line and Smith went through 
a broken field for fifteen yards. 
"Aggie" was then held for two 
downs and fumbled. The ball was 
recovered and fumbled again, this 
time passing to Union. Two small 
gains were made and the quarter 
ended with the ball belonging to 
Union on M. A. C's forty -yard line. 

LAST ol WUTKU. 

Union started the last quarter with 
a gain of three yards after whieh a 
punt was tried and blocked by Mas- 
s:i(hu-eits. M. A. C. made lGyurds 
in three plays but was again penal- 
ized 10 yards for holding. Inion 
held for downs and regained the ball. 
Union toed the ball K) yards ami 
Massachusetts resorted to the for- 
ward pass, first on the right and then 
on the left, following this up witli an 
uii>iicccssful attempt to kick I field 
goal. The game ended with no 
score for either side, the ball being on 
Union's BO yard line. 

The line-up : 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

The football rally which was held 
in the chapel Monday evening will 
probably not be forgotten soon by 
those who were lucky enough and 
had spirit enough to attend. The 
speeches, especially those from Pres- 
ident Butterfield and Coach Brides, 
probably left as great an impression 
as any ever made at a like assembly 
in several years. 

It was Coach Brides' initial bow 
and introduction to the students and 
he made good from the start. Foot- 
ball authorities and critics through- 
out the country have commented 
upon his selection by Massachusetts 
as her director for football teams 
during the next three years by pro- 
claiming him one of the best if not 
the best all-round coach in the game 

today. 

There is no doubt but that Coach 
Brides can turn out a great team as 
soon as he can get a line on the men. 
First, however, he must have the 
men to work with and it is a serious 



M. A. C. 

Kdgerton, le 
Samson (capt.i. It 
Eisenhaure, Ig 
Dole, c 
Griffin, rg 
Baker, rt 
Melican, re 
Gore, qb 
Brewer, Ihb 
.Smith, rhb 
Nissen, fb 



UNION. 

le, Starbuck 

It, Davis 

Ig, Whick 

c, Hokerk 

rg, Page 

rt, Jenkins 

re, Anderson 

qb, Dewey (capt ) 

lhb, Sarvey 

rhb, Huthsteiner 

fb, Wood 




■* 



The Collage Signal, Tuesday, October i, 1912. 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

• $5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



Summary: Substitute for M. A. C. — 
O'Brien for Melican, Clegg for Brewer, 
Howe for Clegg ; for Union— Fischle for 
Jenkins, Jackson for Page. Score— M. 
A. C, o: Union, o. Time of quarters- 
nine minutes. Referee— Knolt of Ham- 
ilton. Umpire— Campbell of Union. 
Head linesman and timer — Grant of 
Union. Attendance— 1000. 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

The senior stock. judging team left 
Sunday afternoon to attend the 
B ffOCk t oa fair, whore it will bo in 
(.(inpotition with similar teams from 
i v New England still OoMsge. 
The team consists of A. F. M<- 
Doungall, J. D. Kit-neb. A It. Lund- 
greu and K. II. (laskill. alternate. 
Hot inning from Ilrookton the team 
will visit the l'almer fair and will 
meet other teams there in competition. 
It i> planned to send the team out to 
the Chicago da it v show. 



Gore, Varsity Quarterback. 

problem to know where to get the 
men. Afternoon classes and lalwra- 
torv ireriods are continually breaking 
into the practices and there is seldom 
a day when the whole team can be 
brought together even for signal 
practice. The campaign at present 
is to get more men out for the squad, 
who are willing to play on the second 
and third teams and gradually work 
up to the 'varsity. 

Saturday's game with Union waa a 
disappointment only in the fact that 
Massachusetts was unable to score. 
The team showed over a hundred 
per cent improvement over the form 
shown the week before against Rhode 
Island State on the campus. Minor 
injuries kept many of the men on the 
side lines who might otherwise have 
been used and counted upon to ren- 
der a good account of themselves. 

This week's practice is in piepara- 
lion for one of the hardest games on 
the schedule. Two years ago the 
team held the big Green team to one 
touchdown. This year the quantity 
and quality of the material is far 
ahead of what it was at that time. 
Wednesday and Thursday's practices 
will be given over entirely to scrim- 
mage practice. Friday afternoon 
the team will leave for Hanover to 
meet Dartmouth the next day, not 
with the idea of tying, or meeting 
defeat but with a determination to 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPEOI ALIST3 IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Noveltiee, 

Rings, Channa Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pint, Fobs, Soale, 

Rings, Charms.'. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Reasonable Me* 



MRI 



AI+I>I£B* 



E.B. DICKINSON D.O.S. 

DENTAL KOO&1S 
Williams Block, Amhkrst, Mass. 

Orrics Hover 

IMolUA.M.l.aOtOflP.M. 



House Next to Laundry. 



Fan A winter Salts & overcoats 

New line of sample* just received 
Made to Order * Ready to Weir Suits 



OVER i$e SAMPLES TOCHOOSE 
FROM 

Order early and get the beat choi 



PIERCE, BILLINGS a CO., Butts, Miss. 

M. B. WHITE 'II. Afrat 

10 Alice Street 



FRESHMAN 

The best place in town to buy Drugs, Chemicals, Patent 
Medicines, Toilet Articles, Stationery, 

CANDIES, ICE CREAM, SODA, 

Post Cards, Fountain Pens, and Photographic Supplies 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

\ Specialty of College Classes 



2 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 

Cigars t Cigarettes 

TOBACCO 



put some of the coaching and teach- 
ing of Coach Brides into practice and 
returning with a victory. 

Kl.'l.KS POM CKLK11KATIOHS. 

At the meeting of the college Sen- 
ate held last Thursday evening a 
committee on celebrations was 
elected from that body to consist of 
Ellis and Harris, 1913. These men 
together with the class captains of 
the several classes will have entire 
charge of celebrations of all athletic 
victories. They shall have the 
power to decide upon what victories 
will be celebrated. 

The rules regulating celebrations 
have been published in Thk BmMU 
011 two different occasious. The rule 
in regard to the ringing of the cnapel 
bell is important. It states that the 
bell shall not be rung louger or later 
than a half hour after the news of 
the victory has been received. The 
games to be celebrated in caae of a 
victory will l>e decided iijKin by the 
committee and announced in due 



AT 



BJ 

The College Drug Store 



season. 



Aggie lost her star track man 
when "Dave" Caldwell decided to go 
to Cornell. The track manager had 
a very good season in view wiUi 
"Bone" to captain Ute team. How- 
ever there is every reaaon to believe 
that the track season will be a suc- 
cessful one especially as there seems 
to be much material in the entering 
class. 



RESERVED FOR FATIMA 



Henry Adams 



T*a«3 Rl$XAJL,r* Store oa* ***«» o o«»*»«>i 





THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CLOTHESI 

FALL OPENING!!! 

We want every reader of this announcement to coatidll u » ptfMMil 
invitation to attend cur Fall Optafcg. Our store is tilled to overflowing with 
fall outfitting, elegant new garments of all kinds for yminj; men, new hats 
and new creations in toggery of all sorts. If you've never Keen hen for 
your clothes come to see what you've been missing. 

Everything Sold at a Reasonable Prii 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



WOODWARD'S 
tUNCH 

•7 Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
if 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



A GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At 
lantic to the 1'acific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



Toefll Mientka 

ICE CREAM, Shoes snined and Polished 



Ciostd »*h from 1 A. M to 4 A. M. 



Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open Hundtjr Main CM. 

On way to foist < HBce. 



Boston Safety Fountain Pen 
Cannot Leak 




Sectional view of the Boston Safety Fountain Pen showing 
Gold Pen and Comb Feed encased in the Air light 
Pen Receiving Chamber which prevents it from leaking. 
Made in three lengths— for trousers pocket— for 1"*" "* 
pocket or ladies purse and regular full length, also selr-hlling. 
An absolutely guaranteed fountain pen. 



Exclusive Agent 



B. MIlylVETT 






For Amherst 



The Collcfc Signal, Tuesday, October i, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 1, 191s. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. H.VANZWALENBURG'rj.Editor in Chief 
C HESTERF.AVI I F.K.LER '14. ManajjingEditor 
OSCAR G. ANDEK^ON 'i.i. Assistant Editor 
FREDERICK I). GK1GGS »IJ, Athletic Editor 
S. MILLER JORDAN '13, Athletic Editor 

HARRY \V. ALLEN '13. Alumni Editor 

STUART B. FOSTER '14, Department Editor 
F.RVINE F. PARKER '14, Alumni Editor 

HAROLD C. BLACK '14, Campus Editor 

J. ALBERT PRICE '15. Associate Editor 

GEORGE B. DON NELL 'is, Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 2d.'i3. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLARK. IR.'u.Asst.Bus.Manager 
ERNEST F. Ul'TON '14. Asst. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J.CLOUGH'iS. Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 



Entered as aecond-ctoet matter at the Amherst 
Pest Office. 



Vol. XXIII. Tuesday, Oct. 1. No. 3 



Aix who obtained the "Aggie" 
8ong-l»ook last 8i»ting will agree that 
it has supplied ■ want long felt l»y 
studenta and alumni of M. A. C. 
The value it ban had in promoting 
college spirit is fully realized l.\ but 
few. Alumni gatherings have been 
brightened by the singing of the old 
songs, and on the campus many redis- 
covered songs are now sung with the 
more recent favorites. A portion of 
the first edition of the volume is still 
to be had and the opportunity is still 
offered to those who have not realized 
the value of the book, and to those 
who have only neglected its purchase, 
to procure a collection of M. A. C. 
songs which will "wear" and retain 
their freshness as long as songs are 
sung. 



At the risk of repeating much that 
was said at yesterday's mass meeting 
the following is printed. It is pub- 
lished mainly for the benefit of those 
who, for some reason or other, were 
not present in chapel last night. 
Matters in regard to the athletic field 
are coming to a head ; it will not be 
long before the active support of the 
alumni will be sought in regard to the 
equipment of the field. But how 
much enthusiasm can be expected 
from alumni who have not seen a 
successful football team represent 
"Aggie" in years? For after all 
football is the foremost college sport, 
and success in baseball, hockey and 
other sports cannot offset an unsuc- 
cessful season on the gridiron. To- 
day the liest material that has come 
to this college in years, is on the field ; 
the team has the instruction of one of 
the best coaches in the country, and 
the foundation of a coaching system 
are being laid. 

And right here is where the poor 
spirit now in college shows itself. 
Men are willing to follow the team in 
practice and to get behind the team 
in mass meetings. But when it 
comes to daily practice there is 



seldom an entire second team to 
give the varsity the conditioning it 
needs for success ! And this condi- 
tion exists in a college of over five 
hundred men ! Many preparatory 
schools get out nearly the entire stu- 
dent body to give the first team 
practice. Can a college mau admit 
to himself that he has less real school 
spirit than a boy? The men are here 
in college today who can give the 
varsity hard practice ; a large pro- 
portions of them are on the side lines. 
It is impossible to develop a 
(..aching system here without nun 
with whom to work. Men who give 
their time to the "scrubs" will, with 
■ year or more of training, be able to 
step into the varsity and fill gaps 
left by graduation. That is the only 
reason for a "system" : to gradually 
develop meu who will some day fit 
smoothly into the varsity combina- 
tion and to keep on hand substitutes 
enough for every emergency. In 
some colleges underclass material is 
brought out and kept on the field by 
awarding numerals only to men who 
have played on the "Ml bs" a cer- 
tain period of time, as well as in the 
interclass matches. That system 
might be tried to advantage here. 
The varsity needs two ami three 
"scrub" teams 011 the field every day 
to prepare it for its games. Has M. 
A. ('. spirit and ambition enough to 
supply them? 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Raymond Philip Walker 'II of 
Taunton and (ierald Kugene Perry 
• I. '» of Amherst have pledged Theta 
Chi. 

The annual interclass cross country 
race will be held Saturday morning 
over practically the same course as 
last year. 

The first "ducking party" of the 
year took place at 1 o'clock Friday 
when three freshmen were the un- 
fortunates. 

The second team suffered a defeat 
at the hands of Willistou academy 
Saturday by the score of 48-0. 
Ehlridge starred for the "scrubs." 

Coach Bride visited New Haven 
last week Friday where he was help- 
ing to form a strong Yale football 
line. With him went Captain Sam- 
son to get some pointers from the 
Yale team. 

Manager Zabriskie of Thk Signal 
awarded the gold medals which were 
offered by Thk Signal last year, to 
those men who might break any of 
the college records at the interclass 
track meet. 

The fall tennis tournament is pro- 
gressing finely, all the first matches 
have been played off and many of 
the second rounds are over. There 
is a good representation from the 
freshman class and there should be 
many candidates to draw from for the 
tennis team next spring. 

At a recent meeting, the Infor- 
mal committee voted to have an In- 



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BANNERS AND POSTERS 



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And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
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Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
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Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
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KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash BlocK, Amherst 

H. M. Rogirs, '15, Agent. 

87 Pleasant St., Studio Phone 303-2. 



formal Saturday afternoon, Oct. It. 
The Informal committee for this 
year consists of Lowry, chairman, 
(1. A. Mallett, II . B. Buroley, C. 1). 

Walker, L. F. Dray, W. H. Haaey, 

1). A. Sheehan, A. W. Brooks ami 
S. M. Jordan. 



NEW YORK CLUB BANQUET 

Secretary John A. Cutter '82, of 
the M. A. C. club of New York has 
-sued notice of the annual banquet 
of the club which will be held this year 
at the Hotel Martinique, Broadway 
and Thirty-second Htieet. Saturday 
evening, Oct. 12th. The toastmaster 
- to be Daniel Willard ex-'*2, presi- 
dent of the Baltimore ami Ohio rail- 
road. Amoug the speakers will be 
President Kenvou L. Butterlield. 
• ieorge C. Underwood, president of 
the Erie railroad and Mr. (Jrawty, 
rditol of the Baltimore Skii. The 
inuouncemeiit is worded in Dr. Cut- 
ler's characteristic style and is eal- 
eulated to bring out I hrgt* attend- 
ance. Among the paragraphs is the 
following :"Nota bene — One hundred 
:i!id seventy-seven Aggie freshmen ; 
. -ighty per cent of the student* room- 
ing in lodging houses : within a few 
rl the undergraduate body will 
number over a thousand." 

SOCIAL UNION 

Major James Anderson of Spring- 
Held, a well-known ci\ il war veteran, 
and for many years commander of 
the Grand Army post in Springfield 
was the speaker at the first I'nion 
entertainment of the year. 

The gathering was held in the 

I Mill hall, Saturday night and the 

pcaker was introduci'd by Captain 

Martin with a few well flkoaal 

,arks. Major Anderson proved I 

11 entertainer and his reminiscences 
of the war from the time he ran 
away from his home in Northampton 
and enlisted in the 31st Maine volun- 
teers while yet a mere lad, to the 
^ laft of the Confederate veterans to 
•Springfield kept his audience alter- 
ely in shouts of laughter and at 
1 losest attention. 

RIFLE TEAM ELECTIONS. 
Friday the annual election of otfi- 
- for the rifle club was held. Tlu 
following officers were elected : Pres- 
et, Allister F. M< Dougall ; vice- 
M.lent, Wallace C. Forbush ; sec- 
1 lary, John W. T. Lesurc ; treas- 
. Ralph H. Oaskill; and range 
tain, Albert F. Kdminister. Some 
\ iv good material has come out 
f m the freshman class and in all 
I < .liability competent substitutes will 
I found for the vacancies created in 
i t year's team by graduation. Pro 
is being held on the outdoor 
gt every Saturday. 



' 1 .— Lomas O. Stevenson was in 
herst recently. He is visiting 
nds in South Had ley. It is 
>rted that he does not intend to 
im to Baruett, Miss., where he 
been farming for the past year. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

UUKAKY. 

Among the new books reeently 

received aie the following : 

Agar, (lurden Design in Theory and 

l'raetuv. 
Arnott, The Book of Bulbs. 
Bcddard,Karth worms and their Allies. 
Bryee. Story of a l'loughboy. 
|)a\eiiport. Heredity in relation to 

Eugenics. 
Fitzhei bert, Book of the Wild (•ardcii. 
Fowler. How to save Money. 
Dallam, Tennyson: a Memoir. 
Heath. British Rural Life and 

Laborer. 
Iledlev. Tramps in Dark Mongolia. 
LongstalT. Butterfly Hunting in Many 

Lands. 
SaintMsur, Making Home Profitable. 
Robertson-Miller, Butterfly and Moth 

Book. 
Muir. Our National Parks. 
Nolnn, Replanning Small Citii *. 
PafS, Roads. Baths and lliidi: 
B:iny. Food and Drugs. 
Bowell. Chrysanthemum. 
Buffer. The Bov and his (Jang. 
Rexford, Amateur (Jardencraft. 
Koe, Our Judicial Oligarchy. 

The attention of the new student- 
is called to the following regulations 
concerning the use of the library : 

Books may be borrowed from the 
library for two week-, subject to 
renewal for two weeks. A fine of 
two cents will Ik« iiujM»sed for evci \ 
day that theliook remains iinreturued 
to the library. Fine accounts not 
settled at the library will be sent to 
treasurer's ollice for collection 
Books cannot be transferred from 
one account to another until the 
change has been properly recorded 
at the library. Students are re- 
quested to use the magazines and 
papers with all reasonable care and 
not to mutilate or remove them from 
the room. This is entirely a matter 
of honor with the students. Re- 
served Itooks may be borrowed from 
the library only over night and must 
be returned early the next morning. 

1 IIKMISTKY 

At the recent eighth International 
Congress of applied chemistry, which 
met in Washington and New York 
Sept. 4-13, the following chemists, 

either now or at one time con t. .1 

with the college were present. 

Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain, Dr. C. 
A. Peters, G. S. Fowler of the col- 
lege ; Dr. F. W. Morse of the exper- 
iment station; Dr. H. J. Wheeler 
'Mo\ director Rhode Island experi- 
ment station ; Dr. B. L. Hartwell 
M'.t. chemist, Rhode Island experi- 
ment station; F. B. Carpenter '87, 
chemist, Virginia and Caiolina Chem- 
ical company; C. A. Smith '11, 
instructor in agricultural chemistry, 
Pennsylvania state college ; Dr. Mr- 
Lauren and Mr. Shaw, at one time 
instructors in the colloge. 

The International Congress is the 
most important and largest of all 
gatherings of chemists. This is the 
first time it has ever met in the 



NOT TWINS 

At M. A. C. you will learn among other things, 
something about plant food, both scientific and practical. 
Science and practice go well together but they are not 
twins. Science for instance can teach you how to pro- 
duce an excellent apple pie, but for many reasons there 
are those who prefer "the kind that mother used to make" 
in the old home kitchen. 

The science of fertilizers has to Jo with certain things ap- 
plied in certain ways, under Certain conditions. In actual practice 
tlu- farmer has to deal with uncertain conditions the weather, Ins 
markets, his labor — and that is where our Hlffl Grade Special 
Complete and Available Fertilizers help him, for they give him 
the best plant food all ready to use. 

StH(/\ the plant food problem. 
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E. C. Edwards '14, M. A. C, Agent. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October i, 191 a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 1, 191 ». 



United States. It meets once in 
ftfSS years; the preceding meeting 
being in London, the one before that 
in Rome. In 1015 it meets at St. 
Petersburg. Probably it will not 
unit in this country again for twenty 
years or more, 

The two subjects of greatest im- 
portance, which were discussed at 
this meeting, were the synthetic pro- 
duction of rubber and the Norwegian 
works for the conversion of atmos- 
pheric nitrogen into nitrogen fertil- 
izers and into nitrie acid for the 
manufacture of explosives. 

rOMOI.OOY. 

The Pomology department had an 
■ vhibit of fruit and spraying ami pack- 
ing apparatus at the Hampshire 
County Fair in Amherst. 

.Judging and packing teams are be 
iug organized and trained for the an- 
uual contest between the agricultural 
colleges of New Kngland to he held 
in Portland, Maine. 

EXTENSION 8KKVICK. 

As is usual at this time of the 
MAT, the Extension toilet is busy 
with county fairs. A feature of the 
work this year are the Bay's stock 
judging coutests. The winners of 
these county prizes are to be sent to 
tin- Brockton Fair where a liual con- 
test will be held. $200 will be of- 



fered in scholarship prizes at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
zooms; y. 
A ID lb. grizzly bear coy te was 
recently presented to the M. A. C. 
museum by Mr. William I). Albee of 
North Amherst. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

During the summer months a large 
number of old M. A. C. men were in 
Amherst visiting friends in town, at 
the College and the Experiment Sta- 
tion. Some of them had not been 
seen in college for many years. 
Among those who were here were : 
Charles S. Crocker '«'.», of Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; Frederick .I.Smith "JO, 
of Pierce. Fla. ; .Fames W. Kellogg, 
'00, of Harrisburg. Pa. ; Kdward (1. 
Proulx 'O.'l, of Lafayette, Ind. ; John 
F. Lyman '0."», of Columbus, Ohio; 
Krvin L. Winn Ml, of Carteret. N. .1. 

At the annual meeting of tin- 
Association of OHicial Agricultural 
Chemists held at Washington, re- 
cently, the following alumni were 
present: '*7— Frank B Carpenter of 
Hh -limoiuL Va. ; 'M— Hurt L Hart- 
well of the Rhode Island state col- 
l,.g t . : *;m>— Charles II. .Jones of tin- 
Vermont Agricultural experiment 
station: H .)'2— Kdward H. Holland of 
the Massachusetts experiment sta- 
tion and '12— Robert Lamsoii of Col- 
lege Park. Maryland. 



EASTERN 




to kc mrU at 

THE AMERICAN LAND AND 
IRRIGATION EXPOSITION 

DONATED ST 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Gxrtkuing ifc» policy ol encouraging apple 
grown* m the Eaat, TW Caa-Martiaarr 
fiMinr aHar* tka Mafatfkaat Eaatera 
Aaata Traffcy (a $750. OS Storitog SiNer 
Priaa Caa) lot the bat 1 5 boae* ol Eaatern 
Grown Apple* shown at the American 
Land and Irrigation Exposition in 1912. 

Eastern Crawtrs af Gaaa* Aaata* tkis 
it Taw O aaar t aarty ! 

You hare contended that your apples are 
superior to those ol the West— here is the 
opportunity of a lifetime to prove it I 

The 15 boaes ol apples lor which the 
COE-MORTIMER cup is ofrrad may 
be any 3 varieties, but there must be not 
lea* than 5 boxes ol each variety. 

tlfJKB II Ml WClHOn M TM 
COMrniTMM. 

There are no "strings" on this ofer. 
The best apples win the cup, whether our 
fertilizer* are used or not. 

No one connected with THE COE- 
MORTIMER COMPANY wUI have 
anything to do with judging the apples or 
•warding the prize. 

I, a expected that the apple, will be judged by Prol. H. E. Va. Dema* lormerly 
United States Government Pomologiat. 

Full information concerning content, together with score-card and entry blank, gladly ant 
to every Fruit Grower who requests them. 

Wa honatlv believe that your chances ol winning the cup will be very much better if 
you I C «3. WC« pl^aUPo^r o I Frank J'^ ««J 
you know that the aapU. that SSS ** I II I J Fja, 'U Uv F^ Cm, «i tk. 



ier'skiaU .Vtk. Nor Eaglaaa Frmt Skaw i. OctaWr, Mil, ware raised witk 
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Gar 

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FROM 

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"JO.— F. L. Taylor, M. D , change 
of uMism. to (J Forest Ave., Natiek. 
'94. — J. IL Putnam has been 
re-eh-.t.d president of the Litchfield 
Scientific society, Litchfield, Conn. 
II* is also serving another term aa 
triisU-o <>f the Connecticut (leorge 
Junior Republic 

•ol. — P. C. Brooks, change of 
address, to care of General Chemical 
Co., Chicago Heights, 111. 

•01.— Dr. Charles T. Leslie was 
married to Miss Grace Kmaliue 
Thickins, last Wednesday at the 
home of the bride, in l'ittstield. 

•(>;$. —Winthrop V. Tower, who 
was visiting college last week, sailed 
for Porto Heo on Saturday. 

'04.— Krnest A. Back has resigned 
his position as state entomologist of 
Virginia to accept a position under 
the U S Bureau of Eutomology. 
He will he located in the Hawaiian 
Islands for the next two years. 

•0,;. —Harry M. Russell has been 
sent by the I'. S. Bureau of entomol- 
ogy to Kiverhead, N. Y. where he ia 
engaged in investigating the insects 
injurious to truck and crops. 

'<><;.—('. K. ILmmI, owner of a plan- 
tation in Porto Hieo, who was con- 
ducting investigations at the I'niver- 
sity of Illinois for the Sugar Produc- 
ers* association, was struck by an in- 
tei urban train. I une 8 while on his mo- 
tor-cycle, and fatally injured. Hewas 
carried to the Burnham hospital 
where he died He supposed that 
the train had to stop at a crossing 
so he kept on. The train however 
did not slacken its >pecd and Hood, 
l>eing unable to swerve aside, was 
hit. 

•((7. —Joseph O. Chapman was 
married Sept. 4 to Miss Natalie C. 
Kelberg and they are living at their 
new home at 14 Stevens street, North 
Andover, after a wedding trip 
through the White Mountains and 
(ape Cod. 

•otf. — J. A. Hvslop, now located 
at Field lalioratory of l\ S. D A. 
stopped off over Sunday en route 
from Portland, Me., where he has 
been investigating an insect outbreak. 

'03.— S. C. Bacon, change of 
address, to 64 Rutgers Ave., Jersey 
City 

Kx-'<>7.— Henry T. Pierce is fore- 
mam of a construction gang setting 
poles for a new high tension line pass- 
ing through Amherst,and in is stopp- 
ing at this town. 

•OH.— William F. Turner of 
Auburn. Ala., visited college 
recently. 

'08.— Carlton C. Gowdey has 
S returned to his position as govern- 
ment entomologist of the province of 
Uganda, British Fast Africa, after 
a vacation spent in the United 
States and the Barbardos. 

'(><>.—(). B. Briggs, change of ad- 
dies to 1015 Fidelity Bldg., Balti- 
more, Md., care Bowker Insecticide 
Co. 



'09. — Oscar C. Bartlett has 
accepted a position as assistant to 
the entomologist of Arizona, who is 
Dr. A. W. Morrill, an old M. A. C. 
man of the class of 1900. 

'10. — Myron S. Ha /en who was 
formerly agricultural chemist at 
Syracuse, N. Y. is now assistant 
sales manager for Coe-Mortimer Co. 
of New York. 

'10.— Married on June 26, Marion 
Rachel Wilkina to Francis S. 
Beaman. 

•10.— William A. Cloues who has 
been engaged during the past year 
aa teacher in the Agricultural high 
school at Lyndon Centre, Vt. is now 
in Wickliffe, O., a/here he is super- 
intendent of the Spring GroveFarm. 
'10.— Roger S. Kddy, Dorchester, 
with D. Eddy & Sons Co. 

'12 — Lewis W. Gaskill, Cornwall, 
Conn., florist. 

•12. — Gaston F. Labouteley is 
engaged in fruit growing at Three 
Rivers. 

'12.— E S. Wilbur spent a few 
days in Amherst last week. 

ex .'13._D. S. Caldwell spent a 
few days in college last week. He 
leaves M. A. C. to enter Cornell 
university as a member of the class 
of 1914. He made a creditable 
showing at the Olympic games st 
Stockholm this summer, and participa- 
ted in several big races in other parts 
of turope before retujniug to the 
I'nited States. It is expected that 
he will make a good showing among 
th. track men at Cornell. 

NINETBKN-NINK. 

Alger, Paul E., farm manager. 
Granby, Conn. 

Barlow, W. I), forest assistant. 
I . S. forest service, Helena. Mont 
Barnes, Benjamin F , 200 Board- 
man St., Haverhill. 

Bartlett, Dr. Oscar C, entomolo 
gist, address R. F. D. No. 1. 
Northampton. 

Briggs, Orwell B., manager of Bal- 
timore office, Bowker Insecticide Co.. 
1015 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. 
Md. Residence 5117 Park Height- 
Ave., Arlington, Md. 

Brown, George M., Jr., salesman, 
111 Duncan Building, 119 Pernio 
St., Vancouver, B. C. 

Caffrey, Donald J., assistant ento 
mologist. Conn. Experiment station 
New Haven, Conn. 

Cardin, Patricio G., entomology 
and plant pathologist, Estaci"' 
Agronomics, Santiago de las Vega:- 
Cubs. 

Chase, Edward I., civil engincc 
B. & M.R.R.,85 VineSt.,SomervilI< 
Codding, George M., with Minis- 
& Whitaker, Fourth Ave. Buildim 
York City. 

Corbet t. L. S., animal husband' 

Kentucky Experiment station, L< 

ington, K\ -., residence 152 E.High ■ 

Crosby, Harold P., superintend' 

of schools, Hyde Park, Vt. 

Crossman, Samuel S., assist: 



I 



entomologist, commission of agricul- 
ture, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

Curran, David A., resident engi- 
neer for Maxwell & Mackenzie, Veg- 
reville, Alberta, Canada. 

Cutler, Homer, teacher of agricul- 
ture and science, Auburn, high school, 
Auburn, Wash. 

Fulton,Gordon R.,156 Beacon Hill 
Ave., Lynn. 

Geer, Myron F., with Frank E. 
Geer & Co., expert builders and 
repairers of scales, 7 Taylor St., 
Springfield, residence 82 Moore Ave., 
Brightwood. 

Geer, Wayne, principal, Wethers- 
field high school, Wethersfield, Conn. 
Hathaway, Elmer F., with C. F. 
Hathaway & Sons, wholesale bakers. 
25-45 Ricbdale Ave., Cambridge; 
residence after Nov. 1st, 189 Upland 
Road, Cambridge. 

Hsieh, En-Lury, present address 
not known. Any information will 
l>e gratefully received. 

Hubbard, Arthur W., farmer,Sun- 
derland. 

Ide, Warren L., farm superintend- 
ent, Gardner State colony, Gardner. 
Ingalls, Dorsey F., fsrmer at 
Cheshire, post-office Berkshire. 

Jen, Huan, care of Butterfield- 
Suire & Co., Tientsin, China. 

Knight, Harry O., farmer, R.F.D. 
Gardner. 

Lindblad, R. C, draftsman signal 
department, N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 
Albany, N. Y., residence 70 Philip 
St., Albsny, N. Y. 

MacGown, Guy E., farmer in the 
town of Turner, Me., address R.F.D. 
No. 2. Buekfield, Me. 

Monahan, James V., landscape 
construction, 1101 Tremont Building, 
Boston, with Warren H. Manning. 

Nesle, Harold J., city forester, 
Room 24 City Hsll, Worcester, resi- 
dence, 2 Sturgis St., Worcester. 

Noble, Harold G., landscape gar- 
dening, 2827 Linden St., Chicago,Ill. 



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French Pried Potatoes 
Hulled Corn 
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Noyes, John, landscape gardening, 
1101 Tremont Building, Boston, 
with Warren H. Manning. 

O'Grady, James R., farmer, "The 
Rocks," Littleton, N. H. 

Oliver, Joseph T., instructor in 
agriculture, Moravia high school, 
Moravia N. Y. 

Phelps, Harold D., farming and 
planting expert for Brett & Hall, 81 
Beacon St., Boston, address Box 
_M"», West Brookfield. Address for 
remainder of 1912, Hatley Park, 
Victoria, B. C. 

Potter, Richard C, teacher, Racine 
college, Racine, Wis. 

Putnam, Charles S., principal. 
Wulpole high school, Walpole, N. II. 
Sexton, (ieorge F., teacher, St. 
Norbert's college, W. Del'ere, Wis. 

Srnulyan, Marcus T., instructor 
M. A. C, Amherst. 

Thompson, Myron W., forest assist- 
ant, Shoshone National Forest, 
U. S. F. S.. Cody, Wy. 

Thomson, Jared B., farm manager 
for Mrs. John Ueid, Monterey. 

Turner, Henry W.. sugarcane far- 
mer, Cape Cruz Co., Knsenda de 
Mora, Cuba. 

Warner, Fred C , instrument-man. 
U. S. & Canada Boundary Survey, 
permanent address Sunderland. 

Waters, T. C. farmer. Rocky Hill, 
Conn. 

Webb, Charles R., farmer and 
forester, Box 21, Shrewsbury. 

WhaIey,JameH S., business address 
29 Broadway, New York City, resi- 
dence «>4 North Arlington Ave., East 
Orange, N. J. 

White, Charles IL, field agent 
M. A. C. Worcester county and far- 
mer, North Uxbridge. 

White, Herbert L., first clerk ami 
librarian Mass. State Board of Agri- 
culture, 188 State House, Boston, 
residence, Maynard. 

Willis, Luther <;., chemist, exper- 
iment station, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Wilson, Frank H. Jr., florist with 
Thomas Roland, Nahant. Residence 
21 Highland Road, Nahant. 

The call has been issued for the 
1909 class letter and it is expected 
that there will be a letter from every 
member of the class. Many letters 
have already been received. "Remem- 
ber the class reunion in 1914." 
O. B. Brioos, Class Secretary. 

RESOLUTION 

Whereas, it has pleased almighty Cod 
in his infinite wisdom to take to himself 
our beloved friend and brother Clarence 
E. Hood '06 ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we the members of the 
Q. T. V. Fraternity do extend to his 
family our sincerest sympathy in this 
their hour of grief ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be inscribed upon the records of 
our Fraternity, that a copy be sent to the 
bereaved family and that a copy be pub- 
lished in the College Signal. 
J. Warren Covill, i For the 
Hastings N. Bartley, I Fratern j tv 
Stanley B. Freeborn, ( w 



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Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the New York and Bos ion 
Fi.owkk Markets. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amhtfrac. 196-R. 



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In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

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Everything Ellootrical 



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LOC4LL/: 5 a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

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The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, October i, 191a. 



TENNIS RACKETS 



Wright & Ditson's, Spalding's, Slazenger's 

— Priced from — 

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... Tennis Balls ... 
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AMHERST 

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Massachusetts Agricultural College 



FORTY-SIXTH YEAR 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



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Lenses ground while you wait 

Collbge Jewelry 

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A M II K KST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



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AMHERST. MASS. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone $9-4 

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Students and Athletes who want the real, superior 
articles for the various sports should insist upon 
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SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Ralph J. Borden, Agent, 7 North Cottage 
EnwARH C. Ekwarus, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



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Athletic Hoard, 

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Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

The College Senate, 

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Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. ('. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

stockbridge Club, 



C.eorge II. Chapman, Secretary 

J. W. Covill, Manager 

L. Kdgar Smith, Manager 

K. H. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, Manager 

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F. I). Origgs, Piesident 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

.1. 1). French, Manager 

O. (J. Anderson, Manager 

K. S. Clark, dr., Manager 

L. (i. Davies, President 

.1. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. McDougall, President 



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DEPARTMENT 



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Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



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PRESSING. 

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All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, suits. Milts and 
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material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
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and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
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Specks! Cars at Reasonable Rates 



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Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa, 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Establish*! in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATI 

The Republican gives the best repori f 

Agricultural College and Amherst 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %*. Weekly, r. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XX11I. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 8, 1912. 



No. 4 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

Won by Doggett 't6 in a6 Min., 30 Sec. 
Varsity Team Selected. 

Tin- annuii! intcrclass cross country 
run was won Saturday morning by 
the freshman class with the scon- of 
7*. Doggett II was the individual 
winner ; his time was Mm. WHO. 
tor tin- six and one-half mile course. 
Those who liuished among the first 
live, won individual cups and places <>u 
the 'varsity cross country team, Be- 
sides Doggett, there were in the first 
live at the tape Schwartz 'Id Ilutch- 
ings'Lt, Baker 'L5 and Richard* l*.. 
finishing in the order Ml <1. 

This year's time M aft. 99 ace. was 
not remarkably fast for the « MUM. 
The record is :U aft. If sec. made by 
Harrows '11 in November, 1910. 
Last year Caldwell '11 won the race 
in 94 m. H'» W see. 

At HM."» the start was made from 
Sunderland. The men were pretty 
well bunehed for the fust few mo- 
ments but UN Doggett and Whitney 
were lending a small group far in ad- 
duce of a straggling line. Whitney. 
Doggett, Hutching*. Schwartz and 
Baker were well bunched and run- 
ning in the order named at a 
point alniut a mile above the "Plum 
Trees." Whitnev was running haid 
Mini evidently was setting ■ faster 
pace than he could maintain. 

Doggett broke the tape at the cross 
walk thirty -six and one-hulf minutes 
after the start ; he finished strong 
and in good condition. Schwartz 
came in half a minute later worn out. 
Directly following came Hutching* 
:tn.l Baker with time of .'17 in. 2<» sec. 
:ind 87 m. 40 sec, respectively. 
Uirhards and Whitney came in soon 
after, aliout a minute apart. The 
majority of the men finished in good 
condition, and only one failed to fin- 
ish. 

The order of the men who finished 
was: Doggett '10, Schwartz 'Id 
Ilutchings '13, Baker '19, Richards 
lfi, Whitney '19, Shirley '14, Cofej 
It;, Lucas '14, Warner '14, ClMsV 
botaft '10, Cory '18, Patten 'It, Bemis 
I.., Tower '15, Barber '1:5, Freed- 
ini'.n '14, Clough 'IB and Coe '14. 
I lie score by classes was 1916-78; 
1918-44 j 19 14- Li, and 19 IV:.' I, 
Oeorge Chapman "(IK was the starter 
and Larrabee'll and Tower 'If, the 
timers. 

The 'varsity team is now preparing 
for the meet with the I'niversity of 
Vermont Oft Oct. 99tfc. The dis- 
tance in that meet will be four and 
nc-half miles. 



FORTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 



Of Opening of the College Celebrated. 
Alumni Speak. 



COLLEGE ENROLLMENT TEAM PLAYS PLUCKY GAME 



Reaches Five Hundred Seventy-Nine. 
Hat Doubled in Last Five Years. 



The senior, junior and sophomore 

lasses had their pictures taken on 

steps of Clark hall this past week. 



The forty-fifth anniversary of the 
..pining of the Massachusetts agri- 
cultural college was observed with I 
special assembly of undergraduate-,, 
alumni, trustees and faculty of the 
state institution in the college chapel 
Wednesday afternoon at Amherst. 
In former years it has been the ftftft. 
torn to hold an informal banquet in 
the evening at the dining hall, but 
this year, this was impossible because 
of the repairs that are now being 
made to that building. The holding 
of the exercise-, in the chapel rather 
added to their iinpressiveness and 
the program of speeches was excep- 
tionally strong. 

The platform was tastefully dec- 
ftfftftftd with palms. President But- 
terlield as presiding officer occupied 
the center of the stage. The speak- 
ers, member* of the board of tfftsV 
ti 1 s and faculty, were seated on either 
side. Many of the local alumni and 
friends of the institution were pres- 
ent, completely tilling the asseml.lv 
hall. The college orchestra played 
liefore ami after the speaking, and the 
students responded in a I tody to calls 
for the college songa. 

.'resident Butterlield outlined the 
significance of the day in a few in- 
troductory words: "Forty-hx- Jftftfl 
ago the Massachusetts' agricultural 
college opened its doors for the fu-t 
time to students. Today we are 
looking forward rather than back- 
ward. At the same time we may 
well stop to consider some of the 
things that have to do with our being 
here now. The full significance of 
the founding of this institution 15 
yeais ago must not be overlooked. 
True, it was a small beginning, but 
it has been productive of bigger 
things ami will continue to grow in 
the future as it has in the past. To- 
day we are going to consider for I 
little time just a few of the things 
that have come to ns and are coming 
to us as our heritage through the 
founding of the college." 

The president then introduced as 
the first speaker Professor Clark, the 
new head of the forestiy department. 
In former years it has been the cus- , 
torn to "haze" one or two of the new 
"freshman" professors in this way, 
making them speak on this occasion 
of their first impressions of "Aggie"' 
Professor Clark said that he hail 
been asked many times the question. 
"How do you like M. A. C. ?" In a 
few words he told of some of his first 
experiences in Amherst and then 
1 expressed himself as frank to admit 

{Continued on page a] 



The first authoritative statement 
relative to the enrollment of ilftdftfttl 
at the college was gix.nout Saturday 
from the president's ollice The 

report -hows the enrollment by clashes 
to be as follows: Senior, !•<> j junior 
101; sophomore. 125; freshman. 
184 ; unclassified. :>l : graduate 
school, 18; total number of students, 
.')79. This statement shows that the 
enrollment at the institution has 
practically doubled during the h*** 
live years. In the fall of 190M there 
were I8S men who registered at the 
college. The freshman olftM was far 
in the lead with I 16. There w. 1. 
/.it seniors, 47 JftftftOffft, M sttpftOftMfftfti 
14 post-graduates and one unclassi- 
fied student. 

In 1909 the total increased tO 
ami the freshman class, the present 
-enioi elftftS, enrolled 194, The m\i 
vear, I'.Mo.the freshmen numbered L r »« 
and the total I ft gi ft li ft tiO ft went up to 
194, A vear ago the enrollment took 
the biggest jump of all and went t<> 
594, the first -year class bringing in 
199, This year's report shows a con- 
tinuance of the healthy growth which 
the college has been experiencing 
dining the last live or six years, the 
period of President Butteifield* able 
administration. The UKCftftM " ! 
in this J 1 -mi's fieshman class Mtf 
inaih- despite the fact thai. f«>r the 
first time in the history of the insti- 
tution, tuition was charged those men 
entering who were not resident - 
the state of Massachusetts. On the 
,,ther hand, the number of new men 

from other state- I.:.- increased 
rather than diminished. 



NEW YORK CLUB BANQUET 
POSTPONED. 

lie. a use of unforeseen conditions 
arising, tin- M. A. ft elub diiim-i t<- 
be held at the Hotel Mai Unique lias 
been postponed from Oct. 1J. to Oct. 
99, The list of speakers will re- 
main the same, including the names 
of Daniel Willard '*:.'. President 

P.utterficld. Frederick I). Inderw I. 

piesident of the Krie railroad 
Mr. Offtfttf of the Baltimore 



Against Heavy Dartmouth Eleven But 
Loses 47-0. 

The Massa. hllsells "AfgsftsT I'"'' 
defeat at the hands of Dartmouth's 
heaw team at RftftOVftl last Saturday 
afternoon, the BCOT* being 17-0. 
The (Ween continued its policy of 
going alter the game rigid from the 
start, and scored two touchdowns in 
the first five minutes of play. BftOT- 
ing continued during the fust half, 
but after the intermission, Dart- 
mouth's si 1 ubs m\ m seriously threat- 
ened the Aggies' goal line. Oft 
the other hand early in the second 
half. Brewer brought the stands |Q 
their feet as he broke through and 
made a sensational 10 yard run. 
His sudden start gave him a fine hail 
over the .scrimmaging mass, and ftftd 
he not been slowed up by injuries 
received esrlv in the gam.', DaM 
mouth's goal line would have been in 
:. 1 danger. As it was. Ilinmtin 
tackled him after a diagonal run 
Herons the field. 

In the last quarter, < •, who had 

l.e.n injured in the first half returned 
to the position of fftftl tei back, and 
under his driving the men who had 
,,..t Dartmouth's powerful first team 
|ol red the flesliel "subs" back fol 

lepeat.-.l first downs until the ball 
was in Massachusetts' |M*sesnioii Oft 
their oppom nl's three yard line. 
( ..a.!. ( a\.inangh then signalled for 
the resell, riew. and among itn mem 
l„i, were "M.M.se"' Kugelhoru and 
il -.-tt. 

The first touchdown came aft.i 
two minutes of play when Uftfttftft 
,n.«I a perfect pa»M from 
Llewellyn and scored Oft I 20 yard 
run. Lat.i Mor.y's muff was ier.,\ 
, l( ,| by Llewellyn who ran 41 J* 
with it". Then Mor.-y crossed the 
sjga] line Oft the next rush. Morcv 
easily the star for Dartmouth. 
..ing the MftMMichusetts goal line 
four times while in action, making 
three :'..'» v:-'d runs, and numerous 
other substantial gains. 

Dartmouth's fifth touchdown came 
after Moicv had run around right 
end on I shift play After d.Mlging 
through the whole Aggie team he was 
tinallv downed on M. A. 0.1. 99 yard 



\,i line bv a fine tackle fiom behind by 
Dinner tickets arc five d-.llais. .Ml-,'"' . wi.iinov then 

(1 „.ss. Dr.Joft- A. Cftttar'M, w|C5ftp4»lft Samson. 

West Seselltv-sevelltll street. New 

York. 



plunged through for 17 yards but 

found the Aggie's fighting hard when 

it took him three more downs to gain 

., . , the necessarv three vards. 

It is booed that the agreement lllt " l " • 

. , V , l , i 1 , , -!<ril<1|1 Substitutions were so frequent in 

wh eh has been circulated and signeil ... ,, 1 

, , „ ,,,„.,. th, hartmoiith I11.c-.1p that each 

in retrard to making out the dance l " . . 

U \ , r , •,,,,, t(l man's period of s. , rfftf was scarcely 

orders for the lufoiiiials will help to 1 

oiiMiHioiun 1 tn ore than a warming up. while 

make them more democratic and give ■»"" llM " .,,..•, 

, , „ Affirie's line particularlv stuck H 
more fellows chances for dftftOM 1 ■*■!»• ■ ' 

. out for the cut re game. Moreover 

there, by assuring larger crowds. jout lor g 


















the College Signal, Tuesday, October 8, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October cS, 191a. 






the (ireen's numerous substitutes 
outweighed Aggie's regulars and 
these Coots arc worthy of eonsiders 

tion by football critics. 

( '1111:111 played :v good game at 
cniter, and when forced to retire, 
Dole inaili- a very good substitute. 
Smith ran hack the only punt during 
his session in smashing style, throw- 
ing off three tneklers before he was 

stopped. Again, when Hosjsett oap- 

tored I forward paM intended for 
Smith, the latter set out and over- 
took Dartmouth's speedy halfback. 
In fact the whole team at all times 
played good football when Dart- 
mouth's speed, weight and careful 
drilling are considered. 
The line-up : 

DARTMOUTH. MASSACHUSKT I S. 

Lafferty, Redridd, I e re. Melican 

Estep, Hickox, Kngclhorn, More, It 

r t, Baker 
beer, W. Rogers I g, r g, (iriffin 

Whitmore, C.ibson, c c, Curran 

(iil>son, Hinman, r g I g, Kisenh.uire 

Rector, r t It, Samson, Wood 

Loudon, Hands, Ashton.re le, Kdgerton 
Llewellyn, (ihee, Cumiski, q b 

q b, Gore, Smith 
Whitney, Marends, 1 h b 

r h b, Howe, Smith, Nissen 
Morey, Harlow, Hogsrtt, rhb 

I h I), brewer, Clegg 
Snow, D.Kogtrs.barlow.f b f b.Graveji 
Score—Dartmouth 47, Massachusetts 
o. Touchdowns— Morey 4. Whitney, 
Llewellyn, Loudon. Goals from touch- 
downs Llewellyn a. Ghee 2, Morey. 
Goals missed — Whitney, Llewellyn. 
Referee — bragg of Wesleyan. Umpire 
— Mi .< ir.itli.it boston college. Linesman 
— Connell of Tufts. Time -four 10 
minute periods. 



M. A. C. ANNIVERSARY DAY 

|i •■ntiuu-il trotu page 1] 

that he liked the place and the col- 
lege immensely. "My reason for 
liking the place,'* he said, '-is the 
impressive spirit of co-operation that 
I have found here. I have encoun- 
ter, d it everywhere, all along the 
line, and I commend you for it. I'm 
\er\ glad to bt here." 

After the singing of -'Fight on to 
Yictotv" by the student body. Presi- 
dent Ihitterlield told of the rapid 
advance which is now being made In- 
states and -cit ions of the country 
today along lines of agricultural edu- 
cation* lie then introduced Dr. 
David Sneddon, commissioner of 
education in the state of Massa- 
chusetts. I lei bcit S. Carruth of the 
class of "7.*i was the last speaker. 
He dwelt on the progress of the in- 
stitution. Before the singing of the 
eoUsgl song at the closing, President 
Huttertield introduced William II. 
Ilowker of the class of '71. the first 
class that entered Massachusetts 
agricultural college. He spoke 
briefly of recollections of that first 
day. There were <'>."» men in the first 
class, only 27 of them being gradu- 
ated. Eighteen are alive and in active 
service today. The annual reception 
of the trustees to the new members of 
the faculty was held directly after 
the assembly in the social union. 



1914 INDEX 

The 1914 Iiiilix board is already 
wrestling with the many problems 
which annually confront each suc- 
ceeding board, but eventually, all 
pussies will be solved, the last page 
of "copy" must be sent to the printer 
and the "best ever" will appear on 
the campus someday early in Decem- 
ber. 

Perhaps for the benefit of the 
freshmen, a resume of what the Index 
is, and what place it holds in college, 
will not be amiss. Nearly every col- 
lege or university in the college has 
its annual, a book published every 
year by either the junior or the senior 
class. Such books are calendars 
and reminders of events of the pre- 
ceding years, they are catalogues of 
student life. Our junior annual was 
first published by the class of 1871, 
the first entering class of the Massa- 
chusetts agricultural college, as a 
small pamphlet. It was designed to 
represent the internal growth and 
status of the college, and in that 
endeavor the fiwinw has beeu emi- 
nently successful. Year after year 
as the college has gradually increased 
in size, scope and standing, so has 
the lmhr kept step with the college, 
giving us the pretentious volume of 
today as the result, I picture of col- 
lege life as we know it. 

Ka«h Mas board hopes to put out a 

book a little better than that of the pre- 
ceding year, and the 1914 editors are 
no exception. In general the book 
will be similar to previous Imh 
the subject matter will be the same in 
many eases, but the method of treat- 
ment will be new and original. 
Many intetesting photographs have 
bean obtained, and the art editors 
have put forth some excellent work. 
Taken all together the Irook will I* a 
valuable possession, a further addi- 
tion to the sets possessed by upper- 
elassinen. and for the freshman the 
lii st of a series of l>ook8 descriptive 
of the four best vearsof his life. 



WILSON MEN ACTIVE 

Saturday morning a few interested 
Woodrow Wilson supporters gathered 
in the I'nion room in North College 
and listened to the words of two stu- 
dents of the Harvard Law school, 
McAllister and Leitner, both of 
whom are actively promoting the 
organization of clubs for the Wood- 
row Wilson college men's league of 
Massachusetts. 

There are undoubtedly many sup- 
porters of Princeton's ex-president at 
M. A. C. and the plan is to form 
these interested in the Jersey gov- 
ernor into a strong active club for 
campaigning purposes in Amherst 
and the vicinity. 

The headquarters of the League 
are at the Hotel Lenox, Boston, and 
the chairman, "Bud" Dewey, Wil- 
liams '09, wishes it understood that 
the movement is for Wilson and 
Marshall and is not a Democratic 
association or a strictly partisan 



UP-TO-DATE 

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Kt>iiaomtl>le Hiitea 



E.B DICKINSON D. D S. 

DKXTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Orrics Hours: 
IM..IUA..M. i.:«« > t« »r» 1*. ."VI. 



M l#S. ,VI.I>1£IV 
House Next to Laundry. 



Fill 2 Winter Soils i Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 

Made to Order ft Ready to Wear SuiU 

OVKR 150SAMPLES TOCHOOSE 
FROM 

Order early and get the best choice 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mm. 

Hl B. WHITE 'IS. Agent 

10 Allen Street 



Give Me Chocolate, Please 



That's the usual order, and no wonder — because 
our Chocolate Ice Cream Soda is a nourishing, cool- 
ing, refreshing and delightful drink. The reason is 
plain : Every ingredient that enters into our : : : : 

Chocolate Ioe Oream Soda 

is the best to be had. This is a special drink that we 
take special pride in making and serving, and we are 
sure that you will like it especially well : : : : : : 

Taw '* the ffjeaict Time "Vov* Are In t 



Henry Adams & Co. 

Tfri© RRXAX^r* Store o«* **»e corner 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



affair. Kepulilicans, Democrats, 
Independants and Progressives are 
nil invited to enroll. At the Satur- 
day morning gathering, Zalniskie *U 
was elected temporary chaiiman. A 
meeting will be called after "Wednes- 
day's assembly at which various 
members of the faculty interested in 
the movement will speak in favor of 
it. All students interested in the 
political situation today are invited 
to remain for the rally. 

It is understood that the Hull 
Hooters who gave Roosevelt s 
majority of one over Taft in the 
BsSsUl straw vote last year, are 
about to organize along lin< sj similar 
SO the Wilson men. 



m yqu In Need oi money ? 

One or two M. A. C. fellows wanted 
to do some canvassing for something 
needed in almost every household. 
A good daily Income can easily be 
made in after hours We know of 
fellows making from three to four 
dollars a day by giving a couple of 
hours' work for a few days during 
each week. Address V. O. box I 
Northampton, Mass 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACKINAWS 



SENATE RULE RECALLED 

The Stasis wishes to call attention 
to the fact that I rule was passed 
last January as follow I 

"No advertisements shall l>e solic- 
ited by individual students or grOOfM 
of students except for the OSSj eH of 
legitimate student activities." 

The necessity for having such a 
rule is apparent. The merchants in 
town are besieged continually as it is 
foi • -ad.-.'" for the Si.jn \i , the Me*, 
the dramatic and track programs and 
for otisST activities having I direct 
connection with the student body. 
These publications are vitally de- 
pendent for their very existence oil 
thi«. form of sup|M»rt. while there are 
an\ BSSJsfcst of other ways that stu- 
dents can invent to help themselves 
along. 




The Fall season is the Sweater time of the year. The Football 
irames call for Mackinaws and Sweaters. W« are showing the 
best styles of the best makers. No fancy prices in this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popnlar colors $1 to $6.50 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

t-j Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makm 

l! 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from i A. M 'to 4 A. M 



A GOWNS 

rotS* American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to Ihr Pacific C"1as«, < <>n tracts a 
Specialty 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes Siilned and Polished 

Moke "Id shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open ShimIujt Main M 

Oa m*y to Ussl • KBesv 



Boston Safety Fountain Pen 
Cannot Leak 




Another Yetzr 
Ahead of Hint 

May it be • happy \ " ""^j 
one — may he always have Faumas. 



With tmtk packet* •/ Fmthmm fern 
25 •/ whkh ttemrt • KanJm 
UmJmmt Ml o mniFntmmml Oritn 



for 

7i*%2?Z££?frs "Distinctively W 
^.tr-S^fa-a. Individual" 



Sectional view or the Boston Safety Fountain Pen showing 
Gold Pen and Comb Feed encased in the Air light 
Pen Receiving Chamber which prevents it from leaking. 
Made in three lengths -for trousers pocket-for Wer ?«* 
pocket or ladies purse and regular full lengtn, also self-filling. 
An absolutely guaranteed fountain pen. 



I£. B. Mir^iSf'T 



Exclusive Agent 



For Amherst 






The College Signal, Tuesday, October 8, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 8, 191a- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

K. H.VAN/.WALI:NIH1<(". 'i',.i:dit«.r in-Chief 
CHKSTKR K.WllEKI.KR'u.MiinauinifEditor 
OSCARG. ANDERSON 'r?. Assistant Editul 
FREDERICK D. GRIGGS 'i J. Athletic Editor 



S MILLER JORDAN 'ij, 

HAKKV W« AI.I.EN'it. 



Athletic Editor 
Alumni Editor 



STUART B. FOSTER 'i«. Department Editor 



EKVTNE F. PARKER '14. 
HA KOI. D C. IH.ACK '14. 
J. ALBERT PRICE is. 



Alumni Editor 
Campus Editor 

Associate Editor 



GEORGE B. DONNEI.L »|J, Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 2d. '13- Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI.AKK.IR.'u.Asst.Hus.Manager 
ERNEST F. I'M ON '14. As&t. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH '1%, Circulation 

Subscription $1 50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 



which it represents. All that is 
asked of anyone, la college, in the 

game, or in the world, is his best, 
and that is most certainly what M. 
A. ('. is receiving from her gridiron 
warriors. The best way in which to 
prove this is to support the team by 
Attending the games, and then when 
in a position to judge, do it fairly, 
on the merits of the team's efforts. 



Change of Location 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Entered as MOond-daM matter at the Amherst 
Pest Office. 



Vol. XXIII. Tuesday, Oct. 8. No. 4 



It does s..,-m stnmgp that men of 
the collect- age with a certain amount 
of alleged intelligence, should find 
amusement in the dangerous work of 
pointing titles at iheir comrades. Hut 
this is the very thing that has been 
done too often by memheisof the regi- 
ment. More than once this year 
loaded shells have been found in 
lilies which have been returned to 
the armory after use on the range 
bet us hope that the old threadbare 
eSQWI «»f " I didn't know it was 
loaded "with its usual attendants, 
will never be brought into service on 
the campus. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notices for this column should be iroppad in 

the Signal oituvor handed to Harold c. uiack 

'14, on or before Saturday preceediiiR each issiit ] 

Oct. 10, <'>-!•"> ■•• m.— M. A.C.thris- 
tian association in chapel. 

Oct. i-'. ."'-<><> p. m. — Football. Hos- 

ton College on Campus. 

4-00 p. m. — First Informal in 

Drill Hall. 

Oct. 1"», 7-45 p. m. — Stockbridge 
club meets. 

Oct. Kb 1-00 P. M.— Assembly. Stu- 
dent ma.ss meeting. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Hroken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PARKS. 



Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Mild St, Northampton 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— or — 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEP1 



Satithoay's football game must 
have demonstrated to all those who 
had a chance to witness it, that the 
grit ami determination of our team 
must not be judged from 
It would have done the heart of any 
old ''Aggie" man good, had he been 
present and seen with what ginger 
our team met the shock, and more 
than shock it was, of the Green's 
irresistable rushes. Every man on 
the Maroon and White did his best, 
gave his entire energy, to check 
(host l.attering-ratn advances. Not 
only was the team tremendously out- 
weighed in both line and baekfield. 
but the men that entered the game 
had to play the game out, though 
worn out and exhausted before the 
gruelling first half was over. The 
heavy Dartmouth men. on the other 
hand, entered the game realizing that 
they had to play at top speed for 
onlv a short period of time and that 
then they would be relieved by others 
as fresh at the start as they. So the 
comparatively light M. A. ( . team 
was not playing the Dartmouth 
team, but the greater part of the 
Hanover squad. The team put up a 
"game" tight which earned the 
applause of the Dartmouth stands 
time and time again. 

May the alumni and pessimistic 
undergraduates not condemn a team 
which is an honor to the college 



"Joe" Harlow 'IS was visiting 
friends .,\.r Sunday at college. 

Edward S. Ha/.cn II of Spring- 
field has pledged Kappa Sigma. 

S. 1'. Huntington l:> was yesterday 
elected to the senate. filling the 
\aiancv created when N. 1'. barsen 
left college. 

Tryouts for checi leader are to be 
run oil soon. The candidates are 
Edwards. I'owers and Hrown from 
the junior class, 

bast week a party of senior 
••bandseapcis" with Prof. Waugh 
joiirnied to Windsor, Vt., where some 
plane-table work was done. 

Professor Neal has a regular news- 
paper olfice iu his junior journalism 
class, with a telegraph editor, I 
copy-writer and copy-writers. 

The junior prom committee for 
1018 bad their group picture taken 
this past week, as did the committee 
for the 1012-H Sophomore-senior 
hop. 

The shortening of the rushing 
season to Nov. .», will do a great 
deal tow aids lessening the longdrawn- 
out suspense of both the freshmen 
and the upper classmen. 

The rifle ranges arc doing a good 
business on Saturdays these days. 
The seniors are anxious to shoot tiff 
their SCONS and many freshmen art- 
trying out for the title team. 

Work seems to be progressing 
rather slowly on the dinning hall. 
The anticipated opening Wednesday 
as was announced was not realized 
and it does not seem to be approach- 
ing very rapidly. 

A number of the boys are taking a 
course in dramatics. The stock 
Company at the Academy in Hamp 
has re cruite d twenty fellows for 
"stipes" and students for the perfor- 
mances of Old Heidelburg. 

Many members of the faculty at- 
tended the pageant at Mount Holyoke 
college on Tuesday. This^ pageant 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 



E.M.BOLLES 

•'THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOV TONIC 

Eldridge'ia Kendall 16 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



C&rptivter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH BlocK, Amherst 



H. M. Rogers, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



as one of the events of the 70tfc 
nniversary of that institution which 
- heing celebrated this week. 
President liutterticld is giving a 
lies of talks at morning chapel on 
a ell-known passages iu the Bible. 
These talks are pal forth in a way 
hat will appeal to the fellows and 
elp bring these passagi > hack to 
iieinory and keep them then . 

A got si many men went with the 
earn to Hanover to see the Dart- 
mouth game. This is a spirit which 
-liould fostered in every way so that 
tlu- teams may have good support at 
all times. Every effort should he 
le to have a big crowd go to the 
Tufts game this year. 
A very exciting motor cycle race 
,> witnessed from south dormitory 
Monday noon, around the IsotBsfl 
Held. llildreth 41 in the -Flying 
I ,.iYee Grinder" and Parker 'l.'> in the 
-Flying Emblem" were the daring 
ridafS. In spite of HildretlTs efforts 
l,. cat cornels Parker was the winm r. 
The second Mcttawampe trek of 
the year was led Saturday afternoon 
l.y Prof. Mackimmie Alioiit sixty 
left the waiting station on the SSSftSJ 
t dm car for Sunderland. From 

there the route lav to the eaves on the 
Mde of Mt. Tobey. After exploring 
the SaVaS the petty returned to Suu- 
derlaad and took the trolley home. 

Dr. Bssart h Spraguc was the 
s,K-ial union speaker led Satin dav 
niug at the meeting in the Drill 
hall. He ga\t a \ci\ intending 
talk in which he told of his . \pcii 
taotS in the great Canadian North- 
west He descriU'd the country, 

. Kplaiuing the geography of it by 
■ an* <»f a large chart. Be SMS 
told of iU agricultural possibilities, 
land values and the npjM.rtunitie* 
which it offers to a voting man. 



although the "Aggies" carried the 
ball to Dartmouth's three yard line 
before being held. Dartmouth sent 
in fresh men every minute with an 
abundance of instructions from the 
coaches, but to no avail. 

It would seem that that the great- 
est thing that the team needs toda\ 
ami has needed for many years past 
is to develop the ability to get into 
the game and play it for all it is 
w..ith :«t the \ei\ start. 'This weak- 
u. -- u:i- shown in all the games last 
Vtar 'The second half of the 'Train- 
ing school game was a splendid 
example of what the team could do 
even against the hea\iest odds when 
it onee got started M.A.C. Mas 
comparatively light team this \ear 
and the only way a light team can 
win is to get the jump «»n the oppon- 
ents. 

The game Saturday afternoon 
should not be a difficult one to win. 
It is the last home game of the season. 
It will be the game of all others to 
start tin- team right. 



PRICE VS. COST 

Theory comes easy. Practice sweats facts out in the 
field. Because the price of raw Materials is In-low th*i 
price of manufactured fertilizers, one might theorize that 
the farmer would save money by mixing his own fertilizer. 

He thought so too once. 

If you have ever tried to provide farm labor when and 
where it was needed, you will appreciate that a saving means 
something more than a difference in price. To put farm labor 
at work mixing fertilizeis when other fatal work is suffering 
entails a cost that does not show until the crops are ham sled. 

It is not the difference in PK1CF. but the difference in 
COST that finally affects the Profit and Loss account. 
Think it over. 

Study the Plant Food Problem. 



■1 
1. In 



, 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 






Studio Phone 303-2 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

There is no doubt, now that the 

Dartmouth game is over, that the 

•hall team will soon find itself and 

Sal Beck" in the remainder of the 

n.es this season as it has always 

.11 the past. The I. suit of Sat- 

lay*s game, overwhelming as the 
ie was, does not by any means 
prove that the team is not the strong- 
that Massachusetts has had in 
I ,1 \.ars. NoeS* game, partic- 
lv a Dartmouth game, can ever 
taken to show the strength Of 
ikness of the eleven. 
\s soon as the student bodj had 
r«l the score the question STOSB 
lodiately as to what was the mat- 
with the team. In the first pla.e 
team was outweighed by many 
1 mds to the man. Massachusetts 
many of her best men laid up 
ii minor injuries and unable to do 
r I test work. 

\s usual the team was fatally slow 
getting underway. The GlStR 
Bd all her points in the first half 
most of thcin in the first period 
■ he very start of the game. In 
-econd half there was no scoring 



INFORMAL SATURDAY 

The first Informal of the college 
vcar will l«- held in the Drill hall 
Saturday afternoon, a day that will 
l*» especially attractive t»eenu*e of the 
varsity football game with liuston 
college which will be played on the 
campus just before the danee. 

As announced last week in Chapel, 
the dining hall will not be open on 
account of tin- extensi\e alterations, 
so the committee has made plans for 

a eaters* to seres saps** la the Drill 

hall. In order to make the dame a 
satisfactory one and to meet the 
increased expense necessitated, there 
should be at least sixty-five couples 
present. Freshmen as well as upp< 1- 
-sineii arc welcome and it is hoped 
that a strong delegation of new men 
will Im- iu evidence. 

The special car for Mt. Holyoke 
will leave the crosswalks at 1 _'-.">») and 
return from South Hadley at 2-10. 
The chap" rones will be Miss KsssfBI 
of Mt. Holyoke ami Miss Item-diet 
of Smith college. The special from 
Smith will leave Northampton for 
Amherst at .' oVhs-k. Itoth spe« ial 
cars will reach Amherst in time for 
the game. 




A. SHEPARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimefs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING Ii SPECIALTY 




CAMPION 

GOODS FOR MEN 



vl 



WILL YOU BE THERE? 

NVxt Saturday afternoon will wine 
the opening of the Informal season, 
and after the football game with 
Boston college, the drill hall will 
again sec a flocking of the faithful 
through its doors. Many a freabman 
will view tin- excitement from afar, 
rattle his bunch of keys against a 
dog-eared meal-ticket, and inwardly 
,|ve to go 10 the '-next one" 
TYw colleges have the opportunity to 
hold dances as often as has M. A. ('. 
and so the delightful habit is one 

psesliaf to this college- A oaique 

feature of the coming Informal will 
be the catering- Chairman Lowry 
has not aa vet divulged whether he Tailor 

intends to run a lunch counter in the 
drill hall or roll a --White House" 
up to the door. 



Importation Lints 

Athlone Woolen Mills Ltd. 
Welch, Magetson's Ties, Caps, Hats 

Dent's Gloves 

Patrick's Mackinaws. Full Dress Suits a Specialty 






CAMPION 

K. C Edwards '14. M. A. C, Agent. 



Haberdasher 



rt 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 8, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 8, 191a. 



CAST CHOSEN FOR "BACHE 
LOR'S HONEYMOON" 

At the tryouts held last week and 
this week, woven of tin- various roles 
in Ifuchelor's Honeymoon" were 
assigned. Forty men have already 
been given tryouts hut three parts 
still reman open. 

Qaorga Znbriskie, 2nd, '11 will ap- 
pear in the role of Benjamin Bachelor, 
about whom the action of the play 
centers. Zahriskie has been prom- 
inent :h an actor at this college, hav- 
ing taken part in all the productions 
of the dramatic society since its 
founding. Miller Jordan 18 will 
assume the role of leading lady in 
the character of Miss Arbuckle. 
Jordan has also been a mainstay in 
the society and his excellent work in 
•The Private Secretary" will not 
soon he forgotten. 

Fred Read '14 of last year's cast 
will appear this year as Anthony 
Cumhiig "private deteetive anil con- 
fidential agent." 

Stuart Moir '11 will take the role 
of Joe, a servant. Harry Brown 'It, 
who i» new to the soeiety, will 

appear as Howston. Harold w. 

Ilvlaml '18 who made such a hit ltd 
year in "What Happened to Jones" 
will appear as Minerva, a role similar 
U» the i>ne he played last season. 
A. L. Hulsi/.er II is the first 



freshman to make the cast and will 
surely score a hit as Marianne, a 
servaut girl. At the tryouts to be 
held today and Thursday, the remain- 
ing tliree roles will be assigned. 



TRACK NEWS 

The prospects for a successful sea- 
son for the cross-country team are 
bright. The varsity team this year 
will consist of the winners in the 
inter-class run which was held on 
Saturday. Since two of these first 
live men are conditioned, the sixth 
and seventh men, Whitney 'II and 
Shirley II will probably run. Whit- 
ney, a member of the varsitv relav 
team last year, who is a short distance 
man, and had never run longdistance 
before, made a very good showing. 
The management has arranged sev- 
eral meets with a number of colleges. 
On Oct.-'*!, the M. A. (.team will meet 
I'niverHity of Vermont at Amherst, 
for a dual run over the Sunderland 
comse of five and one-half miles. 
The day of the football game with 
Tufts, Nov. I, a run will be held in 
morning with the team repiesenting 
that institution, at Mcdford This 
will partake of the nature of a return 
meet, since Massachusetts captured 
the trophy last year when Tufts 
journied to Amherst. It is also 
expected that the team will run 
against Brown and I nion sometime 
during the fall. 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

1SB *p ( Standard of Excellence for over 30 Years ) 1 f > I U 

QUALITY ™«ms^ ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study Ffficlency and Economy in the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer; but It Does Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount of the Right Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER to meet the requirements 
of every Crop on every kind of SOlI. Our experts (who are 
practical farmers) will be glad to assist you in making your selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Values than are 
the /lost Expert Chemists. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

Beware of those fertilizers -whose only commendation is a "cut' in price. 
This is an admission of one of two things— either they have been too 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials. 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station : — " The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends not s " much upon what is paid for it, as upon the 
character of the materials used to make it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty years' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

Insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be " just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will be 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 



CHANGES IN THE RUSHING 
RULES 

The attention of all concerned is 
called to the following changes made 
in the rushing ruh'S, by the fraternity 
conference at its meetiug, Friday 
night : 

1. The rushing season shall end 
Sunday, Nov. :i at I v. m. and fresh- 
men shall pledge at chapel Monday, 
Nov. 1, IMS. 

2. Postgraduate fraternity meni- 
btm shall he allowed to rush fresh- 
men. 

t. No members of a fraternity, 
graduate or undergraduate, shall be 
with a freshman between ti r. M. 
Nov. .'J, and close of chapel Nov. 4. 

Kspecial attention is called to the 
rule that no freshman shall live in ti 
fraternity house until after rushing 
season. The particular attention of 
any fraternity now disregarding 
this, is called to this rule, which is 
still in fon-f. 

W. S. Litti.k, 1'res. 



preparatory to introducing eour.- 
in his own college. M. S. Sherui; 
the editor-in-chief of the Uni< 
says : M 'The Ruralist' proved ago 
feature and was of interest to bo 
suburban and city readers." 

Since the distinctly rural page 
the Union was established, simil 
departments have been begun b\ 
number of prominent New Knglai 
dailies. Among these are the Bos t 
Sunday American, whose farm pit 
is edited by Professor Neal and ti 
Boston I'oxt. The Springfield It<i>- 
lira n has materially enlarged i 
agricultural department, and 1 
Hartford Conraut is doing the san< 
The Boston I/rrahl, publishes fn 
quent special articles on agricultur 
one of which was recently written 
\. K. Jenks Ml. 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



JOURNALISM 

The courses in journalism are 
proving more popular than ever litis 
year, and the courses are outlined to 
be as practical as BOSsMs. The 
junior class gains information on the 
making of a newspaper, and then 
:t< tuallv gather news. The material 
gathered is eventually confined to 
agriculture ami it* allied sciences. 
hut student* are first made familiar 
with the styles of lending newspaper* 
of the country. 

Members of the senior class act as 
head copy readers. They gather 
sections of the junior class aliout a 
large table, and, after reading news 
received from the Tinted Press, 
instructions are indicated on 
the ty|»ewritteii flimsy sheets for the 
juniors to tatty out Thus the first- 
vear journalist* l>ecome familiar with 
such newspaper terms as "rewrite." 
•'play up freak story," "reduce to 'JO 
lines." -tabloid." -cut." "kill." etc. 

It is expected that the seniors will 
aid in editing the Bay Stat! Rural- 
ist, a page in the Springfield Union. 

THE "RURALIST" ONCE MORE 

The "Bay State Ruralist" will be 
resumed shortly, according to the 
announcement made by Professor 
Neal. It will be edited by a staff 
com|K>sed of the second-year students 
in journalism, under direction of 
Professor Neal, with first-year stu- 
dents contributing part of the copy. 

The "Ruralist" was begun last 
year as a feature-page in the Spring- 
field Sunday (nion. It attracted 
much attention, :ts being the work of 
college students and as one of the 
first instances of the prominent feat- 
uring of rural matter by a city daily. 
Letters of comment were received 
about it, and inquiries as to the 
undertaking came from Western 
schools, and the representative of an 
Ohio college visited M. A. C. to 
investigate the work in journalism 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LASI>S< AI'K OAHOKNIV. 

A number of senior landscape 
students under the supervision of 
Professor Wnugh spent Saturday. 
Sept. 2K in Windsor, Vt., making 1 
survey for two additions to a ceme- 
tery. Plans for these additions will 
later be drawn by the department. 

Field collections of shrubbery and 
trees are l>eing made with a view to- 
ward planting them alaait the 
grounds. 

1 \tkksion smvn t 

Louis Pit ard and C. J. Gale of 
lladley were the winners of the st. 
judging contest conducted at tin- 
Brockton fair by the extension 
service If these two boys decide 
to come here to college they will 
receive scholarships of $150 and ISO 
res|«?ctively ; if not the scholarship* 
will l»c awarded the two highest <<( 
the fifteen contestants who do ma- 
triculate here. 

APICULTURE. 

Dr. dates and I. W. Davis 11 are 
engaged in getting the !•« > - 
reatly for winter quarters. Further- 
more, the ground* surrounding the 
new l>ee house are to bt graded in the 
near future. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

The following men have recently 
visited college: John A. Andei n 
'08; Harold .!. Ncale *0!> ; G* 
W. Tupper '12. 

•71.— William II. Bowker, wat 
*|M»ke at anniversary day, stated 
18 of the 27 men who gradual- m 
1*71 were alive and active. A 
pretty good record. 

'75. — Herbert S. Carruth wa- 
of the speakers at the recent ■ 
anniversary day exercises. 

'94. — s. Francis Howard, wli< -' 
year was a graduate student at ■' 
Hopkins university and assi "' 
professor of chemistry at collet 1 > 9 
an instructor in chemistry at 
herst college. 

:»<.».— Bernard H. Smith, I ^ 
recently chief of the pure food ml 
drug inspection laboratory of But S, 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Some of the new ones : 

Shrmps Plied In Corn Ileal 

French Fried Potatoes 
Hulled Corn 
Tobacco Cigars Cigarettes 

Everything better than ever. 



Bt Ml '13 



FARRER '15 



has left the government service to 
accept a position as chemist with the 
Walter Baker Chocolate Co. of 
Springfield. 

'03.— Prof. W. K. Tottingham of 
the University of Wisconsin recently 
visited friends around college. He 
is spending a year in studv at .Johns 
Hopkins. 

•04 —Dr. Krnest A. Back recently 
resigned his position as crop pest 
commissioner of Virginia, to accept 
a position with the national bureau 
of entomology. He will be engaged 
in special work in Hawaii. 

•04. — A son, Henry Noble, 3rd, 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. F. I>. 
GoadStt, at South Bentl, Washington, 
on Sept. •>*>. 

•05.— William M. Sears has 
recently un.lertaken the work of 
developing the sales department of 
the Bartlett I Frost Co. of Stamford. 
Conn. Mr. Bartlett of the company 
is also an '()•'> man. 

•07.— George II. Chapman of the 
experiment station is the author of a 
very comprehensive bulletin on the 
microscopic identification of cattle 
foods. The bulletin is just out. A 
copy is in the library. 

*07.— A. A. Hertford is superin- 
tendent of schools, as well as prin- 
cipal and ilirector of athletics at the 
high school in New Boston. N. II. 

•07.— E. II. Shaw was married at 
Belmont on Oct. 3d to Miss Maud P. 
Johnson. 

Kx-'07.— R. I\ Brydoii is in 
charge of the landscape gardening on 
the estate of Cyrus II. McCortuick at 
I>ake Forest, 111. 

Kx-'07.— Harry C Knox is in the 
fruit and poultry business. His ad- 
fcast is White Rock Farm, Westboro. 

'08.— Miss Alice Washburn of Or- 
fordville, N. H., was married to 
Harry M Jennisou at the home of 
her sister in Fargo, N. D. 
Mr. Jennison is an instructor in St* 
any and bacteriology at the Montana 
agricultural college. 

•10.— W. Arthur Clowes is fore- 
man of Spring Grove farm, WicklifTe, 
Ohio. The specialty on this 12.V 
acre farm is Jersey cattle. 

•10. — Henry R. Francis is with tin- 
Wagner Park Conservation, Sidney ,(.). 

•10.— William 0. Johnson has been 
transferred to the Western Sales 
Division of the Coe-Mortimer Co. at 
Rochester, N Y. Address Box 72*». 
Home address 33*> Andrew street. 

'10.— K. H. Turner has charge of 
agronomy and horticulture in the Ver- 
mont state school of agriculture, 
Randolph Centre, Vt. Address 
Box 22. 

»12.— W. C. Sanctuary, manager 
of Waveny Farm poultry yards, 
New Canaan, Conn. 

•12.— Howard A. Turner has a 
good position with the plant breed- 
ing bureau of the Department of 
Agriculture. 



RESERVED FOR VELVET 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 



In so far as our benefits are mutual. 



THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 



Everything Electrical 



School and College Photographers . 



♦ • 




/ r%C*Al IV' sa Center St., Northampton, Mass., 
i_<^OA*i_i_r. ^ d s<juth Had , ey Mas9 . 

Main Office : These Studio, offer the best skilled 

,546-1548 Broadway, ^lists ™<* most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 8, 1912. 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



Ainherat, Mnaa. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



FORTY-SIXTH YEAR 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



E. E. HILLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jewelry 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (juitar Strin, 
AMHKKST, MANS. 

Next to Post Office. 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



io 15c 

2 I-2C 
2 I-2C 

48c per iloz. 
30c per do/.. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Ralph J, Bokorn, Aiient. 7 North Cottage 
Kkwakh C. Ei>waki>s, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose • Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see otir assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN ft DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Athletic Hoard, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association. 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rife dub. 

The College S< Ml 

Woister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Iude\. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

II. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Sto< kbridge Club, 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone $o-« 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 1 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Liohts, &c. 
• Clifton Ave.. AMHKRST. MASS 



Wrltflit dte Dltaoii 

Catalogues of 
■Tamil Ae Winter Goods 
Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Col 
Mudents and Athletes who want the re<l, superior 
articles for the various sports should insist upon 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson Trade Mark. 



(Jeorge H. Chapman, Secretary 

J. W. Covill, Manager 

L, Kdgur Smith, Manager 

K. II. Cooper. Manager 

W. S. Little, Mauager 

C. Pokclund. Manager 

J. W. T. Lesiirc. Secretary 

F. I), Origgs, Piesident 

Harold F. .Jones, Manager 

.1. 1). French, Manager 

(). (1. Anderson. Mauager 

F. S. Clark. Jr., Mauager 

L. (1. Davies. President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

\ I M. Dougall, President 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wright 1 Oitson (Joods are the standard 1 
all sports 

wMMiHT *»s pnraoM 

U* Washington M., Bostoa, Mass 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

(jnti ke«t -MTvlcr, Rest Work, Lowrsl l'i k • 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, dents' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' line linen suits a specialty. 

Teams wilt call every day at M. A. C 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 34J 4 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chrysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock F.V'EKV night 

foriier Amity and 1'leasant Streets 



If you want to be 

SOLID WITH THK OIRI.S 

you must have your clothes pro* ■«•! anil .-leaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



Pressing »n.l Cleaning • specialty 

Moat liberal ticket system In town 
Tel. ana- 1 1 



Leave AUOIK COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Specie] Care at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST k SUNDERLAND ST. fit CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

\ NKVYSIWI'KK THAT EDUCATl 3 

The Republican gives the best repo; "f 

Agricultural College and Amherv 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Daily, %8. Sunday, p. Weekly, V- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXII I. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 15, 19' 2. 



No. 5 



MAY ISSUE MONTHLY CAMPUS CAMPAIGN OPENS FIRST INFORMAL OF YEAR LARGE SCORE AGAINST BOSTON 



Students of Agricultural Journalism j 
Hampered by Lack of Printing Plant. 

A rural magazine to be published 
by students ..f M. A. t . If among U* 
possibilities. Although nothing defi- 
nite has beta decided on, it is known 
that such I plan has long been under 
consideration, and that the conditions 
now favor it. 

Prof, Robert W.Neal, who has been 
especially interested in the develop- 
ment of agricultural journalism in the 

college, said 1 

•It is true that the possibility of 
publishing a periodical of rural 
thought has l>eeii discuss, d several 
times, and there is no doubt, 1 think, 
that sooner or later we shall have 
-uch a magazine here, as they already 
have at several of the other leading 
agricultural colleges. Certain new 
possibilities are being considered, but 
they may n<»t develop into anything 
practicable. 

"The chief obstacle fu the way «•!' 
founding such a magazine is the la. k 
of money. We have already proved 
thoroughly our ability to turn out the 
material for such a publication. The 
continued use of the articles produce 1 
for the Springfield ('i<i'<„'s feature 
page, Tin H" 'I 8*9* /»'"'"'''>'. estab- 
lish.- that. If only money were 
available, we could issue a magazine 
that we need not be ashamed to com - 
pare with any agricultural college 
magazine of the same type. 

••One of the best gifts the alumni 
could make the college would be a 
£ printing plant. A few hundred dol- 
lars would supply an equipment a.lc- 
■ i ,|n:ite for all the needs of the college, 
fi Not considering student pid.licati.-n>. 
the amount now paid for college print- 
ing in a year would buy the equip* 
inent. employ a competent union 
printer, purchase supplies, and leave 
■ neat balance." 



Plenty of Noise on Campus When 
Three Clubs Hold Rallies. 



Attended by Seventy-five Couples. 
Hall Well Decorated. 



Team Shows Strength and Has LUtle 
Trouble Winning 41-0. 



DEAN LEWIS IN ASSEMBLY. 

Assistant Dean K. M. Lewis *M 
the speaker at assembly on Wednes- 
day and gave a talk on "Kelighm in 
Politics." His main point was that I 
religious and educated man, who is 
really religious and educated, must 
t:ike some interest in the politics of 
his commuuitv. 



NOTICE 

There will be a meeting of the 
n„.nu board Thursday evening 
directly after the Christian associa- 
tion meeting, in the senate room. 

Lo-r. A Slocum tennis racket, 
light weight, cork handle. If found, 
l-lease leave at President's ollice. 



Dean Lewis set the political pot 
boiling Wednesday when, in hi* 
assembly address, he MlgfMted tlu ' 
formation of different political clubs. 
Since then there has been almost no 
rest from a mingling of Hull Moose 
ami Wilson cheers ami occasional 
Taft cries. 

A week ago Saturday, two Harvard 
students, interested in founding 
Wood row Wilson clubs in the col- 
leges, addressed a gathering in the 
union room. Steps were taken 
toward effecting an organization and 
(Jorge Zabriskic -_M, 'Li, was chosen 
temporary chairman. Following 

D.an Lewis's uhlress Wednesday a 
general call WM leaned for Wilson 
men and the dub greatly increase.! 
it-, membership. Post 11 and Tar- 
bell '1 1, were appointed as a commit- 
tee to look into the matter of joining 
with the other cliche Wilx.n 

clubs 

The progressives showed more 
•pep" and ambition than any of the 
other clubs. A violent session iM 
held after Friday chapel and ollio 
elected OD the spot. They arc: P 
ident. fie— 111! '1.1: Nice-president, 
(iriggs 'Us secretary, Wheeler 'I I 
and treasurer. French 'PL 1 1"' 
Mooser's main element of strength 
se.n.s to be, aside from their vocifer- 
OVM numlrers, that they have a button 
(» wad moose, rampant ) which 1- 
eagerly given to all who will accept 
it. These buttons were brought to 
Amherst Friday MM by the profi 
sive candidate for governor, wlioj 
held a short reception, with the aid 
of ••prexy" Samson and Grig 
After the ••meese" have got their 
eampaigu hymns in go.nl working 
order they will ha\e their opponents 
•■beaten to a frazzle" and when the 
senate's straw vote is held Oct :•<>. 
I U. should be Pell to the fore. 

The Taft club was organized "fC* 
terdav morning after I bap. I with a 
lll(>m |',ership of fifty and a couple 
hundred campaign buttons. Father 
for lack of time 01 because of a 
lieelWIHlT on the part of hoiuc of the 
mill III to break into the limelight 
of public otlice. only one otliecr was 
chosen. Davies' single-handed cam- 
paign enthusiasm of the past w. «t 
was" rewarded by unanimous election 
to the position of secretary. Dili- 
gent cheering practice will place the 
Taft fOWei in position to compete 
with their adversaries in the daily 
rallies. The socialists and pro- 
hibitionists ht.ve not yet appeared 
upon the political map of tin cam- 
pus. 



The first informal of the year was 
held Saturday in the Drill hall, and 
was a success from every point of 

\icW. Al.ollt 7.'> couples were pi. •- 
cut. Despite the threatening weather 
conditions, the football game with 
Poston ...liege Added much to the 
pleasure of the occasion, as the 
informal guests were interested spec- 
tators of the contest from the | 
side of the field. 

The hall was decorated in a very 
pleasing manner. Streamers of red 
bunting extending from the ceiling to 
either wall. gave the general effect 

of an en 1011s red arch. 1 he 

orchestra platform situated on the 
w.st side of the hall was tastefully 
surrounded by palms. A large tlag 
curtained off one end of the hall. 
While from the gallelV at the opposite 
end shone fofth the letter II ><t ill 
maroon electric lights. Numerous 
college banners arranged along the 
walls gave a pleasing variation to 
the decorations. 

Owing to the addition which is 
being huilt to Draper hall, the usual 
,,m of having the informal sup- 
per served there, had to be aban- 
doned. Instead, the committee pro- 
sided an innovation by having a 
light supper letted M the hall by 
a local eat. ur. An ..i.-lictia from 
Northampton furnished the BM 
The patronesses were Mrs Puttel- 



Smartlng under the sting of the 

Haiti til defeat, the toggle football 

team in III.' second home gJMBC of the 
s.ason. fell upon their opponents 
from Poston college willi such rifOI 
that the latter were In. Uy to escape 
with the score of 1 -' «» in f»TOf of M. 
A. C. Saturday was not an ideal foot- 
hall day ; the same curtain of mist 
that figured in the work! l.as.ball 
series put in appearance at Amhci-t 
and t.s.k some of the keen edft of 
the playing. Among the specta- 
tors were many fair visitors from 
•o\er the mountain" and "aCrOM the 
rivei" who attended the fust informal 
of the year held later in the af tc - 
n.K.n, and their presence supplied 
additional incentive !■■ IM bftttUttf 

forces. 

At no time was th. A^gic goal in 
danger: in the third period Dull.v <'l 
MjuftloM caused inomeiitarv bar when 

„oke deal I the tield and 

,ta.te.l lowa.d the M Im-ett's 

| H11 . (,orc noted for I. is clean. s,n. 
tackling, came in on an angle and 
nailed the limner putting an end to 
the attell.pl to s, whole 

le team worked well ; the line 
held well and opened lip big holes 
through khMtOfl while the backs 
the plays so well sta.t. d that it 
difficult to -top them. 0«tl l'lav.d 

„ ,,, immi.u -one at qeexf 

ireftftod r.i.w.i iron ■!« iye |»od 



f *' 






Tin. F.M.i r. mi S V M» 

„,.,, , m,-,. wa.,,.1, „f m. a. ... r« i.,* p* "--;'; «*• 



and Mrs. Carman from Smith coll. 



ular features of the day. AHogetbei 



Of the the outlook for the rcsl of the season 
The committee in chargt 01 in. t.,;,,!,,,., f.kiii" 

, m„i looks consn erablv hi ii:iir< i i.ikiii,. 

informal was l/.wry. chairman. Mai- looks n 

, et t, treasurer. Pu.sley. Walker. UriO .oiisideratioi, Sa ur lay 

Jordan Hasev Sheehan. Itrooka and ing. The game ,., detail . 
Jordan, liases. BqA* kicked off to BeweOB who 

Drnrv 



Those who attended are as follows : 

1; ,i:i_Flls, Murray, Ciistman. 

Maker. Hodirs. Paird, Clark, 

(Cantinued on page a] 



fumbled and recovered IM bftil Oil 
his l')-vard \\ui-. (iraves took the 
ball for I yards. Piew.i Ifi yard- 
through tackle and then I JT»fdi 















The College Signal. Tuesday. October 15. 1912 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 15, 1912. 



more. (J raves rushed for first down, 
Drawer carried the pigskin for ."» 
yards and (Jravcs went around end 
for 10 MOM making first down. 
There was a short gain and then 
drawer went over the line for the first 
touchdown which Smith failed to kick 
for goal . 

BostOfl again took the kick and 
Smith received on our Mo-yard line. 
Brewer made \> yards and then 

Qrares, Smith and Brewer made first 
down. Brewer tore off h yards sad 

< J raves crashed through to Boston's 
iO-jard line. Brewer gained ."» yards 
and Smith went over for the second 
touchdown and a moment later kicked 
goal. 

Boston's kiek-otl was received by 

Smith who ran it hack to center field. 
Brewer gained i', vards, (iravctt 11 
and I in succession. Biewer ."> vards 
more and Smith went over for the 
third touchdown ; n<> goal. By this 
time the .Massachusetts cheering had 
changed to a steady chant, "We 
want 17. we want 17" referring to 
the Dartmouth seoie. 

Samson kicked to Kiley of BootM 
and he carried the l.all to the .iM-vard 
line when the first period ended. 

<• i!' Cm Aggie. 

In the second period, two failure* 
to gain were followed by a <piai tei- 
hack run which hrought BoStOfl to 
center field. Kdgcrton broke through 
and tackled the next man for a 1-yard 
loss on a fake kick and Boston then 
punted to Massachusetts on her '•'•*•- 
yard line. Brewer ripped off l."» 
yards. Smith .'■ aioiiud cud ami then 

m leseehsjeetts was penalised . Nissen 

holding. Brewer punted and BostOS 
failing to gain attempted a punt which 

was Uoaked by Samoa. With the 

hall in center field, Nissen. Smith 
and Brewer walked down the Held in 
four rushes and Nisson went ovei for 
a touchdown, <io.il kicked by Dole 

Samson kicked off to O'Neil. who 
was thrown hack to the 30-yard line. 
A high punt was received by Brewer 
and time was called. Knd of lirst 
half. Score. 26-0. 

In the second half the safes and 
second team men were given a chance 
to get into action hut after Boston 
had received the kick-off and failing 
to gain had punted to (lore, the 
inarch down the laid went on till 
Smith crossed the line for another 
touchdown. No goal. 

Samson then hooted koBostOO*! ■">•'»- 
yard line, and Boston lost 10 yards 
on a high pass. Failing to gain 
Boston punted and Smith received 
for Massachusetts, tone made first 
down, (liaves and Nissen made hig 
gains and time was called on Boston'! 
16-yard line. 

In the fourth period , MImm gained 

K yards, fumhled and re c ov e red for 
first down and then crossed the line 
for a touchdown. Dole failed to 
kick goal. 

Samson kicked off and Boston at- 
tempted to punt after failing to gain. 
The pass went high and was recovered 



for Boston with aliigloss. A second 
attempt resulted in another high pass 
and gave a safety for M. A. (.'. The 
same process gave Aggie another 
safety and then rallying for a time 
Boston got off two successful forward 
passes, readied the 3e*yard line and 
tailed to kick goal. The game ended 
with Massachusetts on their 'JO-vard 
line. The line-up : — 

MASSACIIl'SKTTS HUSTON. 

Kdgerton. O'Hrien, le le, Woods 

Samson, It It, Roach, McCarthy 

Kisenhaure, Walker, Ig 

Ig, O'Neil, lirandon 
Dole, Taylor, c c. Hurke 

(iriffin, Harris, rg rg, Hurley 

Maker, Wood, rt rt, Kttligaa 

Melican, Williams, Cleveland, re 

re, Hartigan 
('.ore, Smith, Melican, qh ql>, Duffy 

Hrewer, Clegg, Ihb Ihb, Kiley 

Smith Nissen, rhb, rhl>, Fleming 

Craves, Nissen, fb fb, Heffernan 

Referee — Hubbard of Amherst. Um- 
pire— Foley. Head linesman - Chap- 
man. Time— Four 10-minute periods. 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



THE FIRST INFORMAL 

[Continued Ironi page l] 

Maci.iie. HsBSSnn, Shcehan, Jordan, 
Zabriskie. Ilasey. Cole. Forlmsh. 
Ciiggs. (ireeideaf, i'illsl.urv, Allen, 
Huntington, Whitney, Kllis, Harris. 
Drurv, Neal, Hvland. Burslev. 
I.owiy. Anderson, Mallett. Jones, 
Walker. ( tare. 

I'.'l I Bead. J C. IluUhinson. 
Black, Reid, Jones, Nute, Hani-.. 
Da\ies, Bragg, Tarbell, I.e« te. I 
let. N. K. Walker. Kdwards. B. 1'. 
Walker, Brown and Pellett. 

ltl< — Baird, (J. K. Hyde. 
Kennedy, Draper. II V. Marsh. 
H. II. White, D. J. Lewis. Whorf. 
Boger>. Fuller, S. D. Clark and 
Haskell. 

l'.Mo- Bradley. Montgomery, Dun- 
bar. Choate. Bishop, Cobban ami 
< iilmore. 

Baker, Clapp and Pierpont 'If, 
Williams. Willanl, Fiske. Clark and 
Rae were also present. 



DOES THIS INTEREST YOU? 

There have been many questit.ii-> 
80 the part of newcomers to the col- 
lege as to whether there was not 
some organization which held the 
same relation to the students of agri- 
culture as tin- landscape art club hold* 
to those interested in landscape. 
Then is such a club here in flu- 
sh >ekl>ridge, club, which is organize. I 
for those whose special interests are 
agriculture or horticulture. Kvery 
student is eligible for membership 
and freshmen are especially invited 
to join ; names may be handed to 
B. A. Harris 'l.'». or to any member* 
of the club. 

It is planned to have local alumni 
and others successful in agriculture, 
addtess the club every three weeks. 
At other times discussions and 
debates will be conducted by mem- 
bers of the club. A debate will be 
held sometime during the winter and 
all supporting the losing side will 
"set up" a small supper to the wiu- 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to £5.00 
5soo and $6.00 



1.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BKTYVKEN THE BANKS 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seala, 

Rings, Charms.'. 



E.B DICKINSON D. S. 

D1JXTAL ROO&fif 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OrriCE IIOl'KS: 
WK.ILtA.M. l.»Ot(inP.M. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

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tiers. In the spring a pieuie will bt 
hebl. a* i* done ''} many Other similar 
college Cltlba. 

The Stockbridgo eluh meets e\er\ 
Tue*da\ -evening at seven o'clock in 

room <;. South college. Everyone is 

Invited to attend. 



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Some of the new ones : 

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COMMUNICATION 

BmVOMOV Thk ('01 1 1 01 Su.wi. : — 

Jii nr 8if* : 

In leading the CoLUGI Su.nai. of 
Oct. Kth, the editorial about members 
of the regiment pointing rifles at their 
comrades lias given me a severe jolt. 

What in the name of common sense 
vour military instructors can be think- 
ing of to permit anything of this tori 
passes my understanding. One of 
the first things that cadets were 
taught in mv primitive day was never 
to pnll a gun unless they meant to 
*hoot to kill. Any man who pointed 
a rifle loaded or unloaded at another 
man would ha\e been run out of 

college 

Aside from a matter of militai y 
discipline it would seem to be a ease 
requiring the attention of the-'Dcpatr- 
inent Of Common Sen-. ." if there is 
such. 

I am strongly opposed to lia/.ing. 
hilt I believe that an\ man who is 
guilty of pointing a rifle at another 
Otlghl to he stood on his head in the 
pond until tin- life is nearly soaked 
out of him. 

Yours \er\ truly. 
1 .1 01... 1 |). I.i w 1 \- !»7. 



Everyone enjoys the college paper — and a Fatima /^**=* 



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■ 



I I 






The College Signal, Tuesday, October 15, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 15, 191s. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evenlnjr by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

R, II V AN/.W All -'.NIll'Kt; 'i ?. Kditc.r in-Chief 
C II KSTKR K.WII Kl I.KK M.Mainuin«Kditor 
os, IRQ. \MlKKM)N'u. \n«ist:int Kdit..i 
FREDERICK I). ORIGGS 'ij. Athletic Editor 
S. Mil. IKK JOKPA V13. Athletic Kditor 

II \KKY \V. All EN '13. Alumni Kditor 

SI I'AKT II. FOM Kl< 'u. IVpaitinrnt Kditor 
BRVINE K I'AKKI R'u, Alumni Kditor 

HAROLD <". BLACK '14, C mn MHot 
I ALBERT PRICE 'if. AawdateEdkM 

GEORGE H. DONNELL'tf, Aaaw dat a Mlw 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

01 0RG1 /UIKISKIK id.'M. Hus. Manager 
ERN1 SI S.CLARK.IR.'M.An tB — .Wa—aW 
ERNEST K. rrioN'14. Asst. \dv Manager 

MAIHKK LCLOUGH'H, Circulation 



ard track rules >»y "beating the gun" 
appreciably. The College Senate 

certiiinly emphasises the spirit of 
eo-operntion at this institution, and 
ik»w that this matter has come t<> 
their attention, it will douhtlesa he 

preaented fairly and sqaarely to the 
railway company. 



Subscription $1 50 per vear Slnrle 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd. 

Fntered ■• terond-'-'s** matter tt the Amharw 
Peel Office 

Vol. XXIII. Tpkmiav. Oct. i S . \'o 5 
W1111 tin- formation of chilis for 

the adherenta of the diffe reni p t aa i 

ihnlial candidate*, here at college 

there is no excnse for ■ man to '*aii 
on tlit- fence*' in regard to his politi- 
cal heliefs and cons iclions. Perhaps 

maii\ stodente may m>t be of voting 

age, hut B 111:111 ill college is old 

enough to liegm to have opinions 

aboni the government and pablic ser- 

rante. LH these men start right, 
now. Let them givetMBB thorough 
mental going-over and join one of 
tin- cluhs. If your polities docs not 

tit any club, form ■ sen one. 



Labi spring the landscape depart- 
ment disregarded all principles of 

forestry :iml caused the deforestation 

of the Island in the cam p ns pond by 

rentoYing the tree, which for some 

years had lad :i haiHl-U»-mouth exist- 

The removal of the tree 

gives the island, and consequently 

the pond. 1 barren appearance. 
Journalism of saffron hue might tear- 
fully point a lager at the spot where 

the old maple Stood : might emit 
woeful, gulping "heart-throlis" on 
••old asso< iations" and make 11 scene 

in print which wouhl comfortably 

occupy columns of valuable space. 

Out of reaped fee all who may 

glance this through, and due also to 
an innate lore of life, we only sug- 
^e>t that a willow he planted where 
the maple once stood on the island. 



Tin college man who is awake to 
his opportunities has hi* hours so well 
taken up that promptness in keeping 
appointments b e oo m O S almost imper- 
ative. A mutual appreciation of 
this fact is in accordance with the 
college watchword "( o-operatioii." 
Students who are anxious |o keep 
appointments have fie<pieiitly hecn 
exasperated to (JheOOVef that a trolley 
car due to pass a given point at 7 -d 
slipped by :it 7-41. Even as this 
paper goes to press, the evening hour 
car is found to have violated stand- 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

I Notice* for this column should !*• <lin|i|u-d in 
thcsicNM oitiiv or handed to HafoM C Ulack 
'14, on or before Saturday preceedingeach issue.] 

Oct. 17, r,-i;> e. m.— M. A. C. C. A. 

in chapel. 
Oct. UK— Koothall. M. A. C. vs. 

University <>f Vermont at 
Burlington, Vt. 

Oct. S3, 7-0(1 r. m. — Stock bridge 
chili. 

Oct. 18, 1-tO v. M. — Ill Assembly. 
Phi Kappa Phi Address in 
chapel. 

CAMPUS NOTES 

KeKoy K. Haskins ex-'l">, now at 
the International Y. M ('. A. col- 
lege was in Amherst Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Among the fans who went to New 
York this last week to attend the 
••world's scries" were S. P. Hunting- 
ton. .1. W.Covill and II T. Iladlicld. 

It is hoped that after the freshmen 
had a chance to see, from the gallery, 
what the luformals are like they will 
keep the Informal committee in good 
spirits by turning out. 

The attention of the Hull Moose 
authorities is called to the rule to the 
affect that pledge buttons shall not 
he worn before the morning of Nov. 
1th. The buttons may make good 
sinkers the morning of the 5th. 

In reply to last week's comment 
BOOB the motor Cycle race held oil 
the campus not long since, Parker 
and llildieth suggest that the Sk.vm 
head a fund for the establishing and 
maintaining a permanent motor- 
chrome for future rat « 

At Harvard the students are at- 
tempting to get the light to vote 
while at college without having to go 
home. They are to make a test case 
of the q ue s t i on and if they are suc- 
cessful it is prohahlc that the same 
step> may he taken at M. A. C. 

At a recent meeting of the senior 

rl:i>». the following Officer! Wele 
elected for the first semester: Presi- 
dent, II. A. Harris; vice-president, 
II. W. Angier; treasurer. H. W. 
Howe; secretary, It. S. Kay; ser- 
geant-at-aiins. .1. A. Mnconc ; his- 
torian, .!. W. Murray. 

The sophomores have elected their 
Officerfl for this semester. They are : 
II. 11. Archibald, president; I). II. 
Cande, riot prceiden t ; II. W. Grant, 

treasurer; II. White, secretary ; 
P. II. Jordan, class captain ; I). J. 
Lewis, historian ; C. IJ. Lincoln, ser- 
geant-at-arins and P. W. Hhoades, 
track manager. 

Political enthusiasm is growing 
every day. Friday a Hull Moose 



dob was organized and President 
Samson has heen busy handing 
around the emhlein of his party. 
The Wilson cluh formed the week 
before is full of hope for its man. 
The Taft men, of which there are a 
few, have just organized. 

It's pretty safe to say that the 
chapel hell will ring next Saturday 
night for a victory over Vermont. 
Dartmouth piled up ;">.'> points on them 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists 1 Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



We Carry the Largest Line 



OK- 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DKPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enahle us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANDY TONIC 



Eld ridge '14 



Kendall '16 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



Carpfrvter St Morchoust, 

PRINTER, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
( ards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH DlocK, Amherst 

H. M. Rogers, '15, Agent. 

87 Pleasant St., Studio Phone 303-2. 



nd unlike M. A. C, Vermont whs 
nahle to hold even the second team, 
vlso, by the way, Norwich heat Holy 

1088 6-0 and Norwich was beaten 

v Dartmouth 41-9 earlier in t lit* 
ison. 
Professor Chamberlain spoke to a 

tree gathering of Christian assoeia- 

( ,n supporters Thursday evening, 
ilie otlieers of the association are 

Hiking hart! to increase the inein- 
rsliip and make the organization 

nc which will till a real need here. 
II is hoped that a large number will 

mi out this Thursday to hear the 

peafcer. 

A mass meeting of the student 

.Is was held after assembly Wed- 
lay for the pur|K>se of electing 
issistant inanagci to tin: baseball 
11. In accordance with a ruling 

I lie senate only the member- of 
tiif three upper classes were allowed 
to vote. After the hallots hail been 
counted Harold (I. Kittle '1ft, of 
V wKiirypoi t, was declared elected 
ever ( leorge Melican. 

The cross country men have been 
out practicing every evening since 
the Interclaae and the men are show- 
up well. Doggett and Scliwaiz. 
tfa« crack freshmen, have conditions 
w will probably be iinahle to run 
this fall. There arc a number of 
other likely-hx»king men out how- 
. ..1 and the chances of a good team 
look hrighter than they have since 
( ddwell's departure for Cornell. 

The freshmen soccer football team 

»nit over tolladley Kriday afternoon 

t<< play the team from the academy 

th.re. The game refilled in a vic- 

toiy for the freshmen by the wore of 

I". K. F. Whitney was elected 

cattail on the field just before the 

ie. The academy team while 

\. is light had the advantage of good 

team work while the M. A. C. men 

bad never played together before. 

team will hold regular practice 

in now on and some mote wins are 

looked for. 



On Saturday the Massachusetts men 
got the jump on their opponents ami 
touchdowns followed in rapid succes- 
sion. The "Aggie" line began to 
show its real strength and tore great 
holes between the opposing forwards 
which the hacks >eldom failed to find 
for live and tea yards at a rush. 

In the first period the visitors did 
not once gain possession of the ball 
until M. A. C. had scored three 
touchdowns. Then the visiting cap- 
tain decided to change his tactics and 
chose to receive the kick-off. On the 
defense Massachusetts was equally 
strong. Boston attempted WvafflJ 
fakes and trick plays but the\ w.n- 
quickly smothered by the Maroon 
ends. The visitors also used the 
delayed pass, the same play that 
Dartmouth worked BO -iieee-sfully, 
but never gained more than a yard at 
a time. 

Coach Itridcs took the opportunity 
to try out aniinilier of the new men 

and 111 the last half of the ga drew 

freely on the second ami freshman 
teams. Kven with these changes in 
the line-up the defense did not 
weaken. Ah the end of the game 
approached Boston resorted to punt- 
ing. Four times the visiting eetitei 
Banned the bafl ovw his fullbacks' 
head and twice the bafl went over the 
go:tl line for safeties. 

Practice has Keen resumed this 
week with new spirit and life. Next 
Saturday's game with Kuiversity of 
Vermont is the first football game 
ever played between the two colleges 
and a victorv is looked for. 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

I he f<iotbnll team "came back" 

a vengeance in the game against 

on college on the campus Satur- 

afternoon. A victory had been 

• ted but the large score which 

Bight have ban larger If the first 

team had played the whole game. 

came as a pleasant surprise to the 

wers of the team and served to 

1 out in a measure those 47 points 

•cored against the team by Dart- 

BM .tli. The score was not the most 

iii itant thing, however. The all- 

rot ,d work of the team was the l>e*t 

- shown itself capable of this 

n and gives promise of other 

lies to come in the remainder of 

tli' ./inies on the schedule. 

team that Boston sent to 
A rst was not a bunch of weak- 
There was very little differ- 
ii the weights of the two elevens. 
I weeks ago Kordhain had a hard 
tu, defeating the visitors 14 to 0. 



NEW BULLETIN APPEARS. 

During the past week the bleat 
number of the M. A. ('. bulletin was 
issued. The pamphlet is very neat in 
make-up and appearance and with it's 
numerous new photographs printed 
on heavy paper, is most iittraetive. 
This issue is descriptive of the col- 
lege and its departments. "It is the 
purpose of this pamphlet to deaoribo 
briefly the \:iii<.iis phases of the mis- 
sion of the college. In particular, 
it outlines the college instruction of- 
fered as a preparation for agricultural 
vocations." It is planned to send 
the pamphlet to every high school in 
the state. Those desiring a copy 
should apply to the President. 



TO THE COLLEGE SENATE 

The following petition will be 
found in the college store. Not 
only those who arc directly interested, 
hut those who have any occasion to 
patronize street railways arc asked 
to sign it : 

We, the undersigned, hereby peti- 
tion that negotiations be made 
between the Mass. Northern Railway 
Company (Hampline) and the Hol- 
yoke St. Railway Company whereby 
special cars from Northampton be 
allowed to run down to the college at 
such times as athletic contests and 
informals. 



PRICE VS. COST 

Theory coitus easy. Practice sweats facts out in tlie 
field. Because the price of raw materials is below the 
price of manufactured fertilizers, one might theoti/e that 
the former would save money by mixing his own fertilizer. 

He thought so too once. 

If you have ever tried to provide farm labor when and 
where it was needed, you will appreciate that ■ having nteaai 
something more than a difference la price, To put iaim lahot 
at work mixing fertilizers when Otbel f.nmwoik is sntleiing 
entails a cost that does not show until the 1 lops are harvested. 

It is not the different e in PRICK, but the ditltitnte in 
COST that finall) affects the Profit and Loss BCCOMtl. 

Think it over. 

Stut/v tin Plant I-ood Problem. 



ill 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



P. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Ruppenheimcrs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 




CAMPION 

GOODS FOR MEN 

Importation Lines 

Athlone Woolen Mills Ltd. 
Welch, Magetson's Ties, Caps, Hats 

Dent's Gloves 

Patrick's Mackinaws. Full Dress Suits a Specialty 






CAMPION 




Tailor 



Haberdasher 



K. C. Edwards '14, M. A. C, Agent. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 15, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 15, tats. 



\ 



RESERVED FOR VELVET 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 



1 f*n 



I Standard of Excellence for over 50 Years 1 



IOI1! 



QUALITY thatheahs ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study Ffficiency and Economy in the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer; but It Does Mean the u*e of the Correct 
Amount of the Kight Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There .s an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER t«» meet the requ.rements 

"f every crop o« every kind of soil. Our experts (who tit 

practical farmers) will be glad to a.ssist you in making )our selectiva. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Values than are 
the Host Expert Chemists. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

Beware of those fertilizers whose only commendation hi a "cut' in price. 
This is an admission of one of I WO things — either ihey have been too 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials. 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station : - " The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends »ot so much upon what is paid for it, as upon the 
character of the materials used to make it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS Has been proven during over fifty years' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to l>e " just as good.'' 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will be 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

H. II. Archibald '!.'» won the Ian- 
nis tournament cup last Tuesday l»y 
defeating (iriggs 'L r » in the final 
match; 6-1, 6-3. The match was 
fast throughout, both men giving a 
fine exhibition of tennis. Archibald's 
advantage lay chiefly in liia Speed, 
but he had to work for every game. 

Archibald*! splendid serve had 
(Iriggs puzzled and while he returned 
well. Archibald was often in the 
liju-st position for killw. 

In tin- semi-finals played off just 
previous to this match, Archibald 
defeated Kpstein '16 ; 6-3, 6-3, and 

Griggs defeated Donnell l.">;6-2, 
0-1. Archibald and Grlgga were 
champion and runner- up, respectively, 
in last year's freshman tournament. 
The tournament this year has been 
very successful in bringing tennis 
team po ssibilities to the front. 
There art at hast two if not more, 
such men in the freshman class to 
help out the team besides the rem- 
nants of hist year's team and upper 
classmen who have Im pr ove d during 
the summer. 



FROM 



KIHTOK 



PHILADELPHIA, 
NOT SLOW 



BU 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



INDEX NEWS 

A WOrd at this time will not lie 
amiss in regard to the cards which 
were distributed to the members of 
the senior, junior, ami sophomore 
classes last week. These are to be 
tilled out for the class lists in the 
fwufaaj, and tin- college honors ftp* 
pctided to each name will be taken 
from the record given on the card. 
For that reason it is essential that all 
such matter appear on the card The 
space for home address is meant for 
the home town, and in the space for 
the name, the full name should be 
given. These cards may be obtained 
from Foster, Lincoln or Wheeler of 
the junior class. 



Buy an Imlix. It will he a plsas> 
ant reminder when your son or 
grandson comes to "Aggie." for \oii 

will ever compare tl old days" 

with new days, and how better can 
such a comparison be made, than 
with a book which gives campus 
scenes, events, the fellows met. and 
the activities of the period. The 
volume will become more and more 
valuable to you as the days pass by. 



Freshmen this year should not 
make the mistake of waiting until 
"later" to buy an IikIix. The lime 
to buy is when the book comes out ; 
then you are sure to get one. There 
muv be no "later." 



Orders for the de lu\c edition 
should bt made by placing your 
name and the name to appear on the 
cover on a slip of paper, signify ing 
de luxe, and banded to Mr. Foster, 
or dropped in the Sn.\ \i, office. 

'»><). — Marcus T. Smulyan has re- 
turned to college to continue post- 
graduate work. 



OF < OINTKY OKNTI.I.M 

vizirs rtttfiaa 

J. Clyde Marquis, formerly 
charge of the agricultural journal is 
courses and agricultural publicity 
the university of Wisconsin, an 1 
now editor of the Cbnafff (lenthm,,, 
visited the college Saturday. II, 
called upon President Bntterfiel, 
Professor Waugh and l'rofessoi 
Nasi. It is understood that part of 
his object in visiting M. A. ('. *ai 
to make preliminary arrangements 11, 
connection with a series of article 
dealing with the status of leadin. 
agricultural colleges in various state- 
Speaking of agriculture and tl,. 
press, Mr. Manpiis said: ,4 UaOB< 
tionably the great need is to have tin 
facts humanized, interpreted sad 
made int. resting. Sometimes tin 
professor and scientist object to Id. 
popularizing of their knowledge, bat 
that is a mistake on their part 
When I liist began publicity work il 
W iscoiisin, I got a two-column ail! 
eh- on io« -testing associations ii, 
eluded in the patent inside of a lot of 
country papers. The dairy depart- 
ment received so many inquiries that 
it could not answer them. That 
convinced them once for all that on. 
of the l.est ways to reach the man mi 
the farm is to popularize the fftetl 
and print them in his home paper. 

"The day of tin- rural paper is jiisi 
beginning. Progressive method* at. 
as necessary for the farm paper :,- 
for the farm owner. When tl,. 

Ci.iitiirij Oattieman w«h rcoroaaised 

a little MOTS than a year ago. it ha<l 
some 2(i.O(Mi subscribers ; now a.- 

bars l£ft,000. Our three raqi 

SWatS are, fust, interest; SSSOSd, 

accuracy; third, simplicity Tl 
are a vast number of men who know 
the facts, but very few who 
write tlnin suitably The opportun- 
ity for men who can write well <>n 
agriculture is great The ('<>„,, 1. ,>j 
1it,,th num. for instance, would wel- 
come a writer able to do liiiinoiou* 
articles with some rural lesson con- 
cealed in them." 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

UMn AI'E. 

Professor Waugh has recently bees 
engaged in civic improvement work 
in Georgetown and Hubhardsi a. 
the work consisting of lectures 
professional advice with regard |Q 
park iiiiprovemenls and play gKM 



PUMOLOQT. 

Professor Sears and Dr. Shaw 
an automobile trip through the 
rain region and up into New Ha 
shire surveying apple orchards. 'I 
brought back glowing talcs of 
orchards they visited. 

Piospects are bright for a 
judging team this year as f 1 1 

11 have come out for it. The | 

iug team has not yet been start. 



ol 

ol- 



in' 



EXTENSION SKKVHE, 

Professor Hurd left Amherst Sat- 
r.lay for an extended trip through- 
out the middle West. He will visit 
te universities of Chicago, Wiscon- 
11. Nebraska, Missouri and llli- 
>is. also, Kansas State coll.gr. 
iWS State College and Purdue Pui- 
isity. The principal objective 
oint of the trip is the extension 
pai tinents of these institutions. 
I'rofessor Hurd will make a eareful 
ly of them and their methods 
Ii a view towards comparing our 
, Atension work to that carried on 
where. 
\ number of requests have come 
in from surrounding towns for ,M . 
.\ . C. men for extension work, par* 
ti. ularly teaching of English to night 
claaSSS of foreignei-. This work 
uis ho successfully cariied on in 
hondsvillc and Three Rivers last 
that calls for this year are ur- 
j. ut and numerous. Arrangements 
are being made for fhe systematizing 
■ -f this work, and all men who are 
interested and are willing to take a 
hand in the work are asked to see 
I.. (J. Da vies, P.M4 or Professor F. 
1 1 Waid, in the extension ofliec. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

75. — Dr. William P. Brooks has 
bees granted a years leave of absence 
ftoin his duties as director of the Mas- 
sachusetts agricultural experiment 
statio n . Dr. Brooka has long lieen 
nt from his work on account <>f 
protracted sickness, from which he 
b -lowly recovering. Recently he 
paid a short visit to his friends in 
town. He is now spending a large 
pari of his time at the home of his 
'laughter inCieeiiwich, Conn. Prof. 
I I W. Morse has been appointed 
bj the trustees to serve as acting di- 
re, tor of the station during his ab- 
Sa 

'*•"»• — H. .1. Wheeler after a con- 

SSCtioa of 22 years with the Rhode 

bl.nd State college, a half of which 

time he served as director of the 

exp. riiiu'iit station has tendered his 

nation to take effect on Dec. 1. 

W has received several offers of 

I" nions and hopes to be able to 

announce by Nov. 15 where he 

tl In be located. 

1. — Henry M. Howard who is 

I in market gardening in West 

'on, has written an article in the 

ulture of Massachusetts for 

"ii "Irrigation Crown Squashes. 

ibers and Melons." 

—Prof. Ralph F. Smith, who 

ll:i 'een granted a years leave 

« 'sence from his duties at the 

1 " rsity of California, visited col- 

' '■'-' B his way to Furope. He will 

v l" the year in Spain, Italy, 

'"*' 1 Turkey and other countries 

•» * thern Furope, where he has 

• nt in the interest of the state 

Hfornia, to study the citrus 

fr,: <vhich might be adapted to his 
M 



V 

4g 



'95. — Herbert D. Ilemenway, sec- 
retary of the People's Institute, 
Northampton, has consented to run 
as a candidate for senator of his 
district, on the progressive ticket. 
The last we knew of "Dan" he was 
a prohibitionist. 

?D. — George A. Hillings visited 
college recently. He is employed by 
the l'. S. department of agricul- 
ture as expert agricultural advisor 
for the states of New York, New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania. 

Fx-'97. — John R. Fddy is now in 
charge of an Indian reservation at 
Lane Deer, Mont. With the pg 
ing of the resevation these Indians 
will shortly come into the possession 
of large fortunes in land. The gov- 
ernment is attempting to educate the 
Indians st> that they will be able to 
handle this newly acquired wealth: 
wis.ly. Among other things Mr. 
K.LIv is introducing an improved strain 
of live stock into the reservation. 

'00. — .lames F. Halligan is the 
author of a recent book entitled 
"Fertility and Fertilizer Hints." It 
is a well illustrated publication of 
156 pages which has been published 
bv the Chemical Publishing Co.. of 

Bassos, Pa. 

'04. — John W. I )regg has accepted 
the position as head of the depart- 
ment of landscape architecture at the 
I'niv.rsitv of California. He will 
take 1 1 1 * his new work .Ian. 1, 1919, 

'(».*». — John J. Gardner bee trans- 
ferred from the New Hampshire 
Agricultural College to the I'niv.i 
sits of Illinois where he is now a 
graduate and student instructor in 
horticulture. 

'(»;.- Mar. id. Oct. 12, Richard 
Wellington and Miss Minerva Collins, 
nt I^cxington. Ky. Mr. and Mis. 
Wellington will live in (iencva. N Y 
after Nov. IO. 

'«»«.— Born to Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Robert Parker, a son John Phillips. 
<><•!. *. Hozetnan, Mont. 

'10. — Married, Sept. 27, MsM 
Lvdia L. Fllis and Justus ( . Bailey. 
Mr. and Mrs Bailey are teaching in 
Rust . I'niversity. Holly Springs, Miss. 

'10. — The engagement of Myron 
S Ha/en to Miss Christine C. Beyerle 
of West Lebanon, N. II.. has l»een 
announced. Ha/en is assistant sales 
manager for the < '<»«•- Mortimer Co. of 
New York, having recently been pro- 
moted from the position of salesman 
in western New York. 

BX-'IO. -Chillis Stockwell, Mel- 
rose Highlands. Gypsy moth lab- 
oratory. 

Kx-'KI. — Willard M. S. Titus mar- 
ried to Miss Margaret T. Burleigh 
on July 20th. at Plymouth. N. H. 
Address. York Village, Me. 

'11.— It is reported that Ralph C. 
Robinson is critically ill in a Boston 
hospital with typhoid fever. 

'12. — Fdwin B. Young is secretary 
of the Franklin county Y. M. C. A. 
with headquarters at Greenfield. 



'12.— Robert W. Wales is acting 
as salesman for the Coc-Mortiiner 
Co. His headquarters are at the 
company's ollice at Belfast, Me. 

'10 — It is announced that Walter 
R Clarke is engaged to Miss Ruth A. 
Birdsall of Wallkill, N. Y. Clark 
is in the fruit growing business at 
Milton-on-Hiulson, N. Y., and is 
a member of the linn .1. R. Clarke A 
Son of that place. 

10. —Henry R. Francis is with the 
Wagner Park Conservation, Sidney, 
Ohio. 

10. — William C. Johnson has been 
transferred to tin- Western Sales 
Division of the Coe-Mortiiner Co., at 
Rochester, N. Y. Address Box 72... 
Home address. 33."» Andrew street. 

Kb - K. II. Turner has charge of 
the agronomy and horticultural coin -,-., 
in the Vermont State School of Agri- 
culture. Randolph Center. N't. Ad- 

dreas. Boa IS. 



The following 1910 men are I... . ( 
ted as follow - : 

R.ws K. Annis, Natick ; civil 
engineering. 

Henry A. Brooks MUH Kanwaha 
street, (hew Chase. Washington. D. 
(.'. ; civil engine i 

Sumner C. Brooks, ('».'» Hammond 
-tr.et. < :unbridge. Graduate work 
at Harvard D ssrC TS U t. 

F. Fariihain Damon. I pland, 
California. Inspector and field man- 
ager of I'phiud Citrus Association. 

Lawrence S. Dickinson, Amherst. 
Superintendent of grounds. M. A. ('. 

II. Wells French, Last ( harleniont. 
Farn 

Frank II Partridge, Kamahemaha 

ScIkh.I. Honolulu, Hawaii. Teacher. 
Albert F. Rockw«x»d, Concord. 
( ivil engineer. 




COTRELL and LEONARD 



At a junior class meeting held 
yesterday afternoon the following 
officers wen* elected : President. A, 
M. Kdgerton ; vice-president. L. W. 
Needham ; secretary, J. P. Sher- 
man ; histoiian.C. F. Wheeler; .lass 
captain, II. Nissen ; sergeant at 
SmSS, II. J. Morse. At the same 
time the following men were elected 
to prom committee : Freeborn, Sher- 
man. Nissen. Taylor, Lincoln, Brown. 
Brewer and Bragg. 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
I, 



A GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



the Teachers Exchange 

Of Hotton 120 Roylitnn SI. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes snined and Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open Sunday Main St. 

On way to Post Oflficf. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Qbasi only from t A. Af. to 4 A. M. 






8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 15, 1912. 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



Aiiilierat, M<imm. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 
Shirts, 1015c 

Collars, - - - 2 1 2c 

Cuffs, - - - - a l<M 

Plata wash, - - 48c per 1I02. 

Same, rough dry, • - 30c per do*. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Meani Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suil 



RAON I H.ikI-k.n, A#Mt, 7 N.>rth Cottage 

Kl'WAKIi C. EUWAKI», \<fllt 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN & OVER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



FORTY-SIXTN YEAR 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic liounl. 
The College Senate, 
Foot bull Association. 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association. 
Hockey Aaaociatioa, 

Tennis Association, 

Hide club. 

Roister 1 busters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen lades, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Htoekbridge Club, 



George H. Cbapinau, Secretary 

F. D. Griggs, Picsidcnt 

J. W. Covill. Manager 

I.. Kdgar Smith, Manager 

K. II. Cooper, Mun:iger 

W. S. Little, Manager 

C. Bokclund, Manager 

.1. W. T. Insure, Secretary 

' ' Harold F. .Jones. Manager 

J. 1). French, Manager 

0. ti. Anderson, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

L. G. Davics. President 

.1. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. McDougall, President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till n o'clock KVERY night 
Cornt-r Amity anil Pleasant Street a 



If you WHiit to !•«■ 

Mll.ll) WITH TIIK OIKI.S 
you mo At have your clothes preaned ami cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 

II Amity st. Maroon Store 

Preaalng itml Cleaning a *r»-clalty 

MomI lilicral ticket nyatein In town 
Tel. ao.t-ll 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 
JEWELER anij OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses gruund while you wait 
Coi.i.fci.E Jewelkv 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (iuitar Strin 

AMIIKKsT, MASS. 
Next to Post ( )Hice. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone »- 4 

GAS PITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 

l.KAl) LlOHTS, &C 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASs 

Wriulll «S? iMtSBOll 

Catalogue* of 

Kcill a? Winter Qoodi 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Co 
students ami Athletes who want the ie.l. sui 
articles for the various sports should insist in n 
those bearing the Wright \ Ditv.n Trade M 



Foot Ball 
Basket Bali 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShocs 

Sweaters 

Jersey* 

Uniforms 
for ail sports 

Wright & Ditaon Goods are the Mandai- 
all sports 

WWIOHT .v PITHOII 

V44 Washington St., Huston, " 

THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Oiili kinl srrilis-, tW.t Work, l.owr.l I'rur 

All woik carefully done. Work called fm ^nd 
delivered, tn-nts' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' line linen suit* a specialty. 

Teams will call every day St M. AC 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



TtL No. 3»m 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reaaoaable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNOLRLANO ST. RY. CD 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1874 by Samuel Bowk- 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 

The Republican gives the best rep s "' 
Agricultural College and Amlic^t 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Daily, tf. Sunday, $3. Wuk ,%'• 



: 
x 

U 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 22, 1912. 



No. 6 



WHITNEY ELECTED CAPTAIN ROISTER DOISTERS CHOSEN 



Of Track Team. Is Fast Relay Man and 
Holds College Record for 440. 

Francis W. Whitney <>!' Wellesley 
lias been a Uot s d captain of the track 
team for the season of 181S> 1918. 
He succeeds 1). S. Caldwell, who has 
entered Cornell. Whitney has run 
on the varsitv relay team, ami holds 
the record for the 410 sards run for 
this college. This \ear. in addition, 
he has developed into a cross-country 
man. Under his guidance, the team 
is sure to have a very successful 
season. 




< M'l UN WllllNr ^ 

The team is being rapidly whipped 
into form, and a victory is expected in 
the meet with Vermont on Saturday. 
The men will do their U-st to make 
up for the defeat in football last 
week. On the day of the football 
game with Tufts, there will be a dual 
la-country run with the team from 
that college, at Med ford. The course 
will end on the foot I .all field, ami will 
he timed so that it will finish just be- 
fore the game. Warning is here given 
to over-enthusiastic men, that the run- 
ners are not to be interfere. I with in 
my way. This includes pacing of 
any kind with bicycle or other con- 
veyance, or the giving of water or 
other restorative to a runner while on 
the course. A man so interfered 
with will lie immediately disqualified ; 
1 -oiiseipieutly ■ warning is issued to all 
students to be content to stay on the 
■tdf lines and leave the participants 
alone. 



Last Wednesday's assembly was 
devoted to I mass meeting of stu- 
dents with F. I). Griggs '18 presid- 
ing. Several matters of student in- 
terest were discussed. By an almost 
unanimous vote, it was decided to 
change, with President Buttcrfield's 
"iisent, the Monday and Friday 
Impel from «-!"> to 8-10 in order 
that meetings of organizations might 

■ held to more advantage. Follow- 
ing the mass meeting, there were 

■ Id "caucuses" of the various |K>lit- 
ical parties. Aside from a lot of 

ioise and cheering, the presidential 
uididates gained little as the result 
"f these meetings. 



Ten Names Added to Present List. 
New Constitution Adopted. 

At the meeting of the Roister 
I roisters held Wednesday evening, 
the annual elections to membership in 
the society were made. Ten men 
were elected: 1914 — Bokeliind, 
Brown, Campbell, Hogg, Wheeler; 
HH.-.—S. I). Clark, Hatfield; 1818— 
Hulsizer, Prstt, Serinyan. 

The new constitution and by-laws 
M draughted by the committee on the 
constitution, was accepted and presi- 
dent Zalu iskie outlined the society's 
plans and policy for the coming sea- 
son. 

All the men have been chosen for 
the first east ami rehearsals are being 
held each Tuesday and Thursday 

• v.tiing. As has been the custom 

• \.i since dramatics have held any 
place at M. A. C, it is planned to 
give the first performance in Monta- 
gue ; this will piobal.lv l.c the Friday 
evening before Thanksgiving. This 
year a second cast will D0 maintained, 
which will be drawn upon in case of 
emergency and for programs in some 
of the smaller towns on the schedule. 



NEW RULING 



AMHERST'S NEW "RESIDENT 

INSTALLED 

Dr. Alexander Mciklejohn was 
officially installed as president of 
Amherst college in College hall 
Wednesday before a large assemblage 
of college delegates, alumni and 
undergraduates. Among the many no- 
ted educators who attended the cere- 
mony were Presidents Lowell of Har- 
vard, Garfield of Williams, Faunce 
of Brown, and Hyde of llowdoin, all 
of whom delivered addresses at the 
afternoon exercises. Among the M. 
A. C. faculty who were present were 
President Butterfield, and Prof. K.W. 
Neal, who acted as a delegate from 
the University of Kansas. President 
Meiklejohn was, until early this sum- 
mer, dean of Hrown university, and 
. nines to Amherst as successor to 
President Kmeritus George Harris. 



Mr. F. Lathrop Ames of North 
Kaston, recently donated the sum of 
$7.'»0 to the department of animal 
husbandry, to be used as a scholar- 
ship prize. This prize is to be 
awarded to the three men who stand 
highest in live stock judging, and 
must be used by them to defray ex- 
penses incurred in attending the Na- 
tional Dairy Show at Chicago, where 
they are to participate in the stu- 
dents' stock judging contest. This 
fund is to DC distributed overa period 
of five years at the rate of 8180 per 
year, thus allowing $.">0 to each stu- 
dent. 



In Regard to Official Recognition of 
New Fraternities. 

About a year ago the faculty was 
asked by certain students to indi- 
cate the proper procedure to follow 
if it was desired to obtaiu official 
recognition of a fraternity. The 
President appointed a faculty com- 
mittee bi report on this matter, and 
the following rules were adopted by 
the faculty at a recent meeting: 

No fraternity shall be recognized 
until it is approved of by the commit- 
tee on student life, or by such com- 
mittee as the faculty shall designate 
for this purpose. Application must 
be made through the President of 
the college . in writing. 

Fraternities applying for recogni- 
tion must submit their plan of organ- 
ization, and a statement of the pur- 
pose of the organization for the 
approval of the faculty or their com- 
mittee. Such application shall be on 
the faculty table for three months 
before it is acted upon. 

The charter members of the local 
organization, or in the case of a 
national organization, the charter 
members of the local organization 
and the executive oltleers of the 
national organization shall be requited 
to sign an agreement to the effect 
that their meetings and social func- 
tions shall always be subject to the 
approval of the faculty, and, should 
sufficient cause arise in the judgment 
of the faculty, for suspending their 
charter, tin- decision of the faculty 
will be accepted as final. 

FRESHMAN LOSE TO M0NS0N 

The freshmen football team played 
their second game of the week at 
Monson Saturday and suffered defeat 
at the hands of Monson academy by 
the score of 18 to 0. The team put 
up a plucky fight but the individual 
ability of Captain Oeflngerof Monson 
weighed the balance in his team's 
favor. This clever back ran 100 
yards for a touchdown through the 
entire Aggie team. 

The score : 

M' i\ SON. AGO IK. 

Leake, le re, Itishee 

Keals.lt rt, Whitney 

Barnard, Ig rg, Kicker 

Paul, Francis, c c, Taylor 

Klliott, rg Ig, Webster 

Kates, rt It, Schauffler 

D. Francis, re le, Rich 

Gillett, qb qb, Kpstein 

Oennger, lhb rhb, Eldridge 

Flint, rhb lhb, Cate, Hagar 

Strickland, fb fb, Palmer 

Score — Monson 13. Touchdowns — 
Oefinger, Flint. Goals from touchdown 
— Oefinger. Referee — Howard of Spring- 
field. Umpire— Freeborn of M. A. C. 
Linesman— Lombard of Palmer. Time 
— Two ten and two 8-minute periods. 



ALMOST A TIE 



Vermont Receives Big End of g-7 Score. 
Two Protests Entered. 

The Aggie team play, id the game 
of their lives at Burlington on Satur- 
day, but after outplaying their 
opponents for three periods, they 
were defeated by two decisions of 
the referee which made a touchdown 
possible and secured a safety for the 
university of Vermont. The decis- 
ions were so manifestly unjust that 
Coach Mdei and Manager Covill 
have decided to protest the score of 
9-7. 

The team played a fine game, 
especially in the offensive. The line 
tore great holes through Vermont's 
resistance and Brewer, (lore, Smith 
and Nissen made repeated gains of 
16, 2a and 80 yards Their inter- 
ference also helped and was far 
superior to that shown by their rivals. 

The game was marred by consid- 
erable rough playing on the part of 
Vermont. Seftou and O'Brien 
played well for them and were tin- 
only ones who were able to gain dis- 
tance for their team. Vermont tried 
the forward pass time amUime again 
but it was not successful until the 
Utter part of the game when they 
secured three successful passes for 
long gains. Both teams used the 
wing shifts and most of the gains 
made by l»oth were directly through 
the line. 

Massachusetts got into the game 
with lots of "pep" at the very start. 
The ball went to her on Vermont's 88 
yard line after Vermont had failed to 
make first downs, by a narrow mar- 
gin. A long gain by Samson and a 
plunge by Brewer carried the ball 
over for a touchdown. 

Vermont strengthened perceptibly 
after being scored on, and for the 
remainder of the first and the next 
two periods, the play was very evenly 
matched, although both goals wen 
threatened more than once. In the 
last quarter the M. A. C. team' was 
weakened by the Iobs of Samson, 
Brewer and (Jraves on account of 
injuries, ami was handicapped L\ 
the heavy wind which favored Ver- 
mont iu the punting game. Massa- 
chusetts was penalized and thrown 
back to her 15 yard line when Smith 
held a Vermont end on an attempted 
forward pass ; but Vermont received 
no penalty whatever when the Ver- 
mont end deliberately slugged Smith. 
Two more rushes put the ball on our 
four yard line and a plunge by Sef- 
ton carried it over for a touchdown. 
A few seconds later a punt by 
O'Brien of Vermont fell on the Mas- 
sachusetts goal line and was kicked 
over where it was recovered by (ion- 






The College Signal, Tuesday, October 



22, IQI2. 



of M. A. C. The referee decided 

tli.it it u.-is :i s:i t\J y for RfaSOaCuU- 
setts. This gave Vermont tli*^ game 

with :i score of ;>-7. The game 
ended with the ball in Vermont*! 

possession on out 2"» yard line. 
Samson kicked utl. HjlII received 



by O'Brien of VerrtUht. After an 
ttaoncoaaafal attempt at ■ forward 

pass Smith of Vermont made a <_':tin 
of .JO yards through a broken Held. 
for first down. Unt Massachusetts 

•piiekly tightened up and Vermont 

was obliged to punt. (Joiv nc.iscd 
the punt and rushed it hack to our 
40 yard line. Hv a Mftef of Unc 
plunges Vermont, was steadily driven 

hack, liitw. r taking full advantage 
<»f the big holes opened op i»v tint 

line and making three first downs on 
.'J<> and M yard sjaiii». A fuiiil.le 
gave the hall to VefiOOOt Line 
plunges failed to gift Vermont her 
distance by a narrow margin and the 
hall went to .\l:i>s:nlnis< tt> on \'er- 

monfe M yard line. Here, a 10 

I gain I »y Samson as line plungi- 
and an end inn by Hrewer ijnirkU 
carried the hall OVOf for the hot 

h.iiehdouii. Samstm kicked an 

goal. Boon 7-0. 

taOOfl kicked Of t.. Whaleli of 

Vermont. Uv a seri. > of rushes, bj 

ton, Clatfey ami Smith, the pig- 

skin was carried hack to our !'.'• yard 

line where the period ended with the 

ball in Vermont'! possession. 

In the second ipiarter three downs 
failed to (.ring the hall an\ nearer 
our goal line. O'Brien faded in 
placing the hall OVOf the bar on a 
trial for field goal and Massachu- 
put it into play on the .'<• yard line, 
lirewer reeled ofT a brilliant gain of 
•"" yards, tiore 1 da fumhlc. 

Brewer punted t*» Vermont, who 
received on hei lu yard line. \ 
aeries of brilliant gains by SofftM 
placed tin- ball within our .skirmish 
line but a penalty on Vermont for 
holding carried them hack lovards 
Three futile plunges and an 0*000- 
Cessflll forward pass gave us the hall. 
Brewer with live yards. Smith with 
two and Bi gala with nine gave 

us first downs. Smith with five and 
Brewer with a gain of lOjaffdl ear- 
ned the play to mi.itield for iuiother 
first down, which Brewer duplicated 
in the next play with a II yard gain. 

Vermont braood up at this point and 

Smith resorted to a punt, which was 
returned by Vermont from her 10 
yard line. The secoud quarter ended 
with the hall in Massachusetts' hands 

on Vermont terrftotrj . 

In the seroinl half (rule leeei\ed 

from Whalen and was tackled 00 
Massaehiiselts *P> yard line. Failing 
1o make fust down Smith punted to 

Vermont Not being able to gain 

fust down by rushing, Itotli teams 
resorted to panting in which Smith 
of M. A. C. proved himself superior. 
Samson earned the ball up the Held 
for lfi yards on a trick play only to 
lose it on a fumble. 

Vermont received the ball in the 
middle of the field. Two long gains 



by O'Brien and the first successful 
forward pass of the game followed 
by furious line charges carried the 
hall to our HI yard line. The Mass- 
achusetts men strengthened wonder- 
fully here, and although the ball was 
placed within two yards of the goal 
Vermont could not force it over. 

The quarter ended with the ball in 

Massachusetts possession on her 
eight yard line. 

Vermont came hack strong in the 
last quarter, while hTemecibnentti 

was handicapped by the loss of two 

of hei eteongeot men. Snmooo and 

Brew Failing to make the re- 

quired distance Smith punted. 

Vermont received and rushed back 
to our 10 jnrd line. A forward pass 
gave them Brat down. Smith of M. 
A. ('. was penalized for holding, the 
penalty carrying the ball to our lfi 
yard line. O'Brien made 1 1 yards 
ami Sefton carried it over for a 
touchdown from the fottl yard mark. 

O'Brien kicked the gouL Boon 7-7. 

O'Brien's powerful kick-off for 
Vermont carried the hall OVOf the 
goal line. M was unable 

pOfal her distance from the SO yard 
line and the hull went to Vermont on 
a punt. The punt was returned 
from M. A. C.*S 1 5 yard line, hit the 
ground and was kicked behind the 
goal by I Vermont player, where it 

iron r ec o v e red bj Gore. Decfauonof 

tee, a safety. Score '.'-Tin favot 
Of Vermont. The hall was then car- 
ried to the center of the field h\ a 
long gain by Nisseu and a punt. 
Vermont rushed it back to our gfi 
yard line when the game ended with 
the hall in Vermont's possession. 
The line-up : 

VI KMONT. MASSAi IH'sKTTS. 

Sefton, re le, Melican, O'ltrien 

Klynn, rt It, S.itnson. Wood 

Hayes, Salmond, rg Ig, Eisenhaure 



UP-TO-DATE 

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Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

£5.00 and $6.00 

$4-00 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 22, 191 2. 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BKTWKKN THK HANKS 



THE 

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616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
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SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies, 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

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New line of samples just received 
Made to Order &. Ready to Wear Suit: | 

Latest Styles 
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Farr, Currier, c 
Perry, Davison, \% 
Whalen, It 
Mifltn, fe 
O'Brien, qb 
Zurck. i'utnam, fb 
Fitzpatrick, le 
Smith, Frank, rh 

Score— Vermont 
achusetts 
Sefton. 



c, Hale 

rg. (iriflin 

rt, Baker 

re, Fdgerton 

qb, ("»ore 

fli, * .raves, Melican 

rh, Smith 

Ih. brewer. Nissen 

9 (protested) ; M ass- 

7. Touchdowns — Brewer, 

Safety — Gore. Goals from 



Williams Block, Amhekst, M 

Office Uncus: 
ni-.iu \.m.i.:kh...ti'.\i. 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mass. 

N. a. WHITE 'IS. Agent 
10 Allen Street 



touchdowns — O'Brien, Samson. Ref- 
eree—Flaherty of Vermont. Umpire— 
Kodswell of Burlington. Mead linesman 
apman of II, A. C. Timer— Dr. 
Stone of Vermont. Time — four 12-min- 
ute periods. 



TO FRESHMEN AND OTHERS 

The nanm M. A. C. Chrietiaa As 
sociution is of recent adoption. < >ne 
object of the name is to indicate the 
breadth of the organisation. Dnder 
the prevent condition! its members 

<-;ui be more freely solicited than was 
possible as a loeal Y. M. ('. A., vet 
it is still atliliated with the Interna- 
tional Y. M.C. A. 

it is hoped that with the passing 
weeks its meetings will receive more 
general support, ami fulfill an aim in 
making them informal gatherings 
where anv student is invited to ex- 



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Dainty, delightful and deli* ions don't half express the satis 
fart ion and pleasure you will have when you purchase 






LIGGETTS CHOCOLATES 



• t 



Liggett's Chocolates please because they represent the height 
of perfection and nothing but the finest and best of ingre- 
dients are used in them. Skilled workmanship renders them 
pleasing to look at as well as to taste. 

FINE CHOCOLATE COATINGS. RICH CREAM AND NUT CENTERS. 

PASTE AND JELLIES. 

A Fresh Shumkm RnCKtTBO Every Week. 



Henry Adams & 

The R1JXAIJ. Store 



CO 



On *«-»« Corner 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 

THE KENNEL CLUB 

Some of the new ones: 

Shrimps Fried In Corn /leal 

French Fried Potatoes 
Hulled Corn 
tobacco Cigars Cigarettes 

everything !>ettcr than ever. 



proat his views. 

Prof. Wiiugh will «ii\e 1 brief talk 

next Thursday evening. The fol- 
lowing week ■ report froai President 
Davie concerning tin- college v. M. 
I L convention In Boatoa will oe- 

cupy I part <»f the time. Student 
speakers will doubtless 1 1 « > 1 c 1 forth for 

several succeeding meetings, start 
tali veek bj attending the meeting 
and bringing some one with yon. 



BIRDSALL 13 



FARRER 15 



INDEX NEWS 

About two weeks more will see the 

finishing tomhes on the Jade*. The 
editors are working night and da} to 
ensure the booh earning ont on time. 

A vers interesting volume is being 

prepared and ao stndenl shoald miss 
obtaining one when thej are plaoed 
on sale iii December. 

(hie of the features of this year's 
Aide* will he thejiiany line photo- 
graphs Of familiar scenes about the 

eampne. T. W. Niooiel who has 
bean the official class photographer 
foi the class "i I'M I for the bat two 

years, has always been on the look- 
out for interesting events, ami the 
hook will he a tine pictorial record 
of th< 

This year, the class histories will 
not be tin- itsid, sal pieces of litera- 

ture as in most of the past volumes. 

hut will In- of a very unique eliaiae- 

The COVet dO S tg B will he DM 

w hicli i-> sure to pies 







A Choice Bit in the Tattler 

Everyone enjoys the college paper — and a Fatima 

60 Fatima coupons will stturt a uhile tattn pillow 
top, 24 In. tquart, dtcorattJ with hanjtomtly 
pttnltj _ flowtn — 1 2 denim to tetect from. 



SWEATERS 

and 
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The Fall season is tlu- Sweater time of the year. The Football 
games call for Macktnaws and Sweaters. W'e are showing the 
lust styles (if the beat makers. No fancy pliers in this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 






SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College Photographers . . ♦ 




^JUDIO 



LOCALLY: 5* Center St.. Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



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New York City 



These Studios BflMH the drsi skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment ohuinable 



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In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

EZverytHing Electrical 



i : r .i;q s. MLf 1 m ~?.„ 
FOUNTAIN PEN UP 

Minimize your fountain pen 
troubles by ownlnft a Moore'a. C It •« »be 
safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
Cits strength lies In its very simplicity. Nothing 
flniky to get out of order. C. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. ft 

For Sale by Oealers f.v*rywhen -J/ 

American Fountain Pen Company _/ j 

A.l.ims. ( ..iliinfi & Kompr. SelHnft Attenlii j. 

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The College Signal, Toeeday, October 22, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 22, 191a. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OP EDITORS 
R. H.VANZWAI.ENBURG '^.Editor in-Chief 
CHESTER E.WHEELER'u.ManaRingEditor 
OSCAR O. ANDEK^ON'n Attistant Editor 
FREDERICK D. GRIGGS '13. Athletic Editor 
5, MILLER JORDAN '13. Athletic Editor 

MARRY W. ALLEN '13. Alumni Editor 

STUART B. FOSTER '14. Department Editor 
ERVINE F. PARKER 'm. Alumni Editor 

HAROLD C. BLACK 'u. Campus Editor 

J. ALBERT PRICE '15. Associate Editor 

GEORGE B. DONNELL'H. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. ad. '13. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI.ARK,|R.'u.Asst.Bus.Manag«r 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Aast. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH'iS. Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 

matter at the Amherst 



Vol. XXIII. Tuesday, Oct. is. No. 6 



Pkksident Alexander Meiklejohn 
comes to Amherst college as an able 
educator working for the perpetuation 
of a high educational idea. His 
reputation as a wise administrator 
pret'cds him and he logins the direc- 
tion of the institution along purely 
classical lines, with enthusiasm. M. 
A. C. wishes President Meiklejohn 
and Amherst every success in the 
development of the "Amherst Idea." 



drill. In spite of the oflicer's state- 
ment to the contrary, it is still un- 
fortunately true that the pointing 
of rifles continues. Nearly every 
drill-time a mock execution is con- 
ducted. It is with no idea of criti- 
cising the military department, but 
only in the hope that no fatal acci- 
dent may ever occur that we empha- 
size the importance of impressing 
more deeply upon the newer mem- 
bers of the battalion the danger of 
pointing rifles at any time. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Sk;nal Office or handed to Harold C. Black 
'14, on or before Saturday preceeding each issue.] 

Oeu. 24, 6-45 p. a.— M. A. C. C. A. 

in Chapel. 

Oct. 26, Football.— M. A. C. vs. 
Holy Cross at Worcester. 
6-30 in Drill hall, Social 
union games. 

Oct. 29, 7-00 p. m. — Stockbridge 
club. Room G. South College. 

Oct. tt| 1-30 p. a. — Assembly. 
Speaker to be announced. 




Che 
pheasant 

jlmitp St., 

rtmhersi 



Tel. 470 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— of — 



HRBAKFAST 

LUNCHEON 
AFTERNOON TEA 

Dinner if arranged for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



On another page will be found an 
article by Professor Sprague dealing 
with the humanities. It is the intention 
lei publish, from time to time, short 
articles by different members of the 
faculty. These articles will deal with 
the work of the various departments 
and will aim to give the undergradu- 
ates an idea of the different lines of 
study open to them here. 

Thk second most iui|K>rtant game 
on the season's schedule will be played 
this coming Saturday at Medfonl. 
Every year the team puts up a great 
fight against Tufts and plays before a | 
crowded stand of M. A. C. alumni 
and undergraduates. This year the 
team is better than at any time withiu 
the memory of upperclassmen and a 
big delegation will go down from 
Amherst. Every Btudent has a little 
credit somewhere ; "touch" your 
bountiful saint or get your sixteen 
back from the treasurer. No matter 
how it's done, let us swarm onto 
Tufts' oval two hundred strong next 
Saturday. 



Tub commandant's reply to our 
correspondent of last week will 
be found in another column. Cap- 
tain Martin is perhaps correct in 
stating that "a better set of officers 
and men cannot be found in any 
college." But his officers very nat- 
urally cannot be everywhere or see 
everything that is going on, especi- 
ally before the '"call" sounds when 
they are busy preparing for the day's 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Signs of winter — new outside doors 
on North dorm. 

Clark Leonard Thayer of Enlield 
has pledged Beta Kappa 1'hi. 

At Wednesday's assembly Frem h 
and Needham were elected to the 
social union commttee for this year. 
Ralph H. (iaskill '13, of Amherst 
and Setli W. Banister M.'>, of West- 
ford have pledged lambda Chi Alpha. 
The Roister Doisters and the musi- 
cal clubs weut to Hamp Saturday 
morning and had group pictures 
taken. 

Among the notables who visited 
M. A. C. campus this week was Com- 
modore Peary who came down to 
see Aggie during his stay in Amherst 
for the inauguration at Amherst 
College. 

The hockey men met after chapel 
Wednesday when a short talk M 
the game was given by Captain 
Hutchinson. Soccer football will be 
used as a meatiB of getting the large 
squad into condition. 

Fernald of the freshmen evidently 
believes in "all things to all nun". 
In addition to a bull moose button 
he is wearing a Taft pin, to which I 
Wilson pin was added lately. It is 
whispered that he has a Mantling 
order for prohibition and I. W. W. 
pins as soon as they are ready. 

The new olive drab uniforms for 
the members of the freshman class 
arrived last week and the regiments 
present a better appearance than 
when in "cits". The new uniforms 
seem better than the old ones in 
every respect. All of the officers 
who purchased the new uniforms 
wear the regular leather puttees and 
these add greatly to the appearatn e 
of the uniforms, at the same time 
causing a bad quarter hour every 
morning. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEFT. 

B.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C. S TORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOV TOIMIC 



Eld ridge '14 



Rendall '16 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'5 



Carptivter & Morehoust, 
PROTEUS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash DlocK, Amherst 



H. M. Rogers, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



WHAT THE DEPARTMENTS AIM AT-THE HUMANITIES 



Prof. Robert J. Sprague Points Out the Value of the Humanities 

to the Practical Man. 



Studio Phone 303-; 



No citizen needs ■ general educa- 
tion more than the fanner, in order to 

g»t out of his occupation and 
environment all that his nature can 
absorb and appreciate. 

The rural citizen is dealing with 
both nature and ni:m, and be must 
have both the scieiicesaud humanities, 
lie needs physics for mechanical 

interests, cheieietry, botany i biology 

and the kindred special sciences for 
his fields :m<l orchards ; but be also 

must be 1 tax payer and perform bis 

part of the civic and political duties, 
mid consequently he must have an ed- 
ucation in the humanities. The scien- 
inay enable a farmer to get an eco- 
nomic living, but the humanities will 
help him to really live in a Metal and 
political organism which abounds with 
problems calling f« solution and with 
opportunities for all kinds of intel- 
lectual culture and social netware. 
To teach of man, his history, civil- 
ization, language, literature, aOO* 
iiomic, social and political problems; 
this is the Held of the humanities. 
Let the sciences teach of < lod's world. 
His universe and laws, the abounding 
forces of life in nature ami bow to 
employ them for . •xistence and profit ; 
but we of the •'Humanities" will 
show what man has done of himself 
and how be can better bis conditions 
l.y oiganizatiotis and social adjust- 
ments. 

Mich a work might be called the 
"division of citizenship." Too long 
have American institutions neglected 
such instruction for preparing citizens 
of the democracy to fill their places 
in the social body. Local politics, 
public finance, poor-house manage- 
ment, tramp problems, game laws, 
good roads and schools, transporta- 
tion facilities, rural delivery and par- 
rels l»ost, telephone systems, labor 
problems, co-operation for buying 
and selling, the socialization of the 
church and the social legislation of 
Congress, are all of importance to 
the fanner, and his education must 
cover as much as possible subjects 
which will tend to make the country 
man the most cosmopolitan of citizens. 
( itv men and rural men have the 
mam things generally ; urban culture, 
...nveniciices and luxuries must be 
earrM to the farm, and the heart of 
the modern cliff dweller ever turns 
tottarda the open sky and the indc- 
ndent life of the country side. 
Modern inventions and progress are 
ipidlv wiping out the old distinctions 
tween city and country people, 
both will need occupational training 
nloug with general education in the 
humanities. • 

Every college man should take the 

ortunities afforded in his junior 

1 senior year to roam over the 

! .id field of thought and study, to 

mint himself with the greatest 



works of man, the vital human prob- 
lems of intciiscst social interest. 
that is. to become a world citizen, a 
cosmopolitan. 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

The varsity football team had the 
Williston team as travelling com- 
panions on the trip to Hurlington. 
Friday. Williston played Vermont 

I a. 

seconds before the varsity game, 
winning 11 to <». On the trip the 
Williston coach and Mr. lhides had 
a fanning bat during which the for- 
mer paid I tribute to the line 
showing that ltl€ made against 
Williston. 



It is to be hoped that Captain Sam 
son's injured hand is not seri.-us 
and that he will soon be as well as 
ever. His plaOS On the team could 
not be filled in vase of his enforced 
retirement. 



POOtball illations with the l'ni\ei- 
sity of VemMttl were resumed Sat- 
urday after an intervening period of 
four years. The first football game 
between the two colleges within the 
memory of some of the younger 
alumni was played in I*|m>. Begin- 
ning with that game the records now 

show six g am es of football having 

been played, three of which have 
been Massachusetts victories, two 
Vermont victories and one tie. 

Aecording to the report of last 
Saturday's game it is doubtful if the 
return to football relations has been 
a good thing for the two colleges. 
The teams were evenly matched 
although Aggie appeared to have the 
game neB in hand during the tiist 
half. In the last period Vermont 
made a final effort to even up the 
score ud succeeded in doing 

Just before dm close of tat game 1 

fluke gave the Vermontcrs a two 
point margin on a decision of the 
referee as to whether the play in 
question was a toochbaek or a safety. 
The game went to the Vermont 
eleven by a 9 to 7 score but only 
aftei Massachusetts had entered two 
protests. The first of these, to take 
precedence over the other was in 
regard to alleged slugging on the 
part of several of the Vermont team, 
a deliberate violation of the rules of 
the game which the officials never 
saw or made any attempt to see or to 
inflict penalties for. Smith was the 
victim of one blow while endeavoring 
to intercept a forward pass. He 
was out of the game for several min- 
utes. Maker's opponent slugged him 
so hard as to open a long gash over 
Baker's right eye and at the same 
time fracture the knuckle of the man 
who gave it. 

The second protest was against the 



PREPARED 

PLANT FOODS 



Almost as much depends upon the proper use of feitili/cis as upon 
their composition. We must remember that chemically prepared 
fertilizers art />/«•/<//••./ //./«/ J'ooJs ; that loi best results they should be 
applied to a property prepared Med bed or field. To feed highly con 
centrated foods to an old, winded horse or .1 sickly cow exposed to the 
cold and wet, is usually money and laboi thrown away: so it is money 
and labor poorlv expended to buy Commercial manuics and tppfj them 
to sour, wet. half baked land, or to land halt plowed and poori) prepared. 



Study the Plant Food Fiobltni 
— 'Hurt is something in it. — 






I 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 






Kuppenheimers 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 




CAMPION 

GOODS FOR MEN 



Importation Lit* 

Athlone Woolen Mills Ltd. 
Welch, Magetson's Ties, Caps, Hats 

Dent's Gloves 

Patrick's Mackinaws. Full Dress Suits a Specialty 



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E. C Edwards '14. M. A. C, Agent. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 22, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 22, 19"- 



deeieJoa of the official* on the play 
that meant rioter* or • tie for **er- 
moot, it earns la the lad ten min- 
atet of play. Vermont bad been 
jrniiiinjjc steadily when suddenly the 
Aggies bejd and s i>unt loll. .wed. 
Smitli was steading on his goal line 
undecided as to whether the ball was 

going t«» cany over Of BOt Because 

of this hesitancy be Joggled the ball 

just long enough to allow the opposing 

ends t<> throw Wiin back over the line. 

Since lie una standing on the line 

when the hall was caught the rule 
Miyi that it is " touchhack. The 
referee ruled the play as sueli, hut 

the arguments and dispute that fol- 
lowed led bin to change Ma'decision 

and the play went as a safety. 

Hany of tin ataesanhnaette men 

were for retaliating hut Coach Ihidcs 
would not Stand for any rough STOrl 
,„, the part of his men. The men 
arc not ••son" OTOf the 1'— "I' tlu' 
g*BM hut rathe. Ofi 1 the manner in 

which it su won by the other side. 



compare the two teams in snttdpa- 

tioii of the annual gaOM between the 

two colleges st Springfield Nov. 16th. 
The Springfield team doesnotappeer 

to he as strong as usual : at least it 
hasn't shown its real form. 



The Tufts game I* only a matter 

often "lays away now : whether the 

team wins or loses depends to a large 

extent on how many of the students 
will support it ami make the trip to 

Ifedford. The Tufts game is second 
only to the Training school game la 
importance and every year the Hos- 

tou alumni turn out in larger and 

larger Bombers to sec the team in 

action. Let the watchword for the 

next ten da_\> be "On to Ifedford 

and TufU." 



The defeat of tin- Springfield 

^ M c. A. eoUege team bat Rater- 
day by Holy Cross was the first 
defeat the Training school has suff- 
ered on Pratt field in football. The 

fr :ilI ,e that Massachusetts puts up 

inn the purple in Woroestei this 

coming Saturday and tin resulting 

,,. will tlive the follow,,- of both 

Springfield and II I « a chance to 



COMMUNICATION 
Borroaa or Thk ('<>■ ' "•' St.;s.\i. ■.- 

I >, ,n- Sir* : 

Daring the seven years I have been 

connected with the Massachuset ts ag- 
ricultural college I have never asked 
vou for Space. 1 would not do so 
„ow except that I would not be doing 
1, iv duty if I did not in some wav 

notice the oomrounkatioa published 
in your la>t mm and signed Iry Mr. 
George D. Leavens ''.'7 

Kirst I want to thank you for the 
editorial in voiir issue of < >ct 8th. 
Coining as it did in the rerj Urst 



ElANKCOE FERTILIZERS 

. . . ^ •• ,.- Sw «wr SO Years I 1 > < — 



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T Standard of Kxcellence for over 50 Years I « > 1 li 



QUALITY THAT MEAWS ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study I f f Iciency and Economy in the use 
of Fertilizer*. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
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Amount of the Ki«ht Kind of Terti.uer for K.ch Particular Crop 

The.e Is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER - ** ' -»* re,uirea»rnt« 
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the Host Expert Chemists. Let Your Crops Prove to N «u 
theTutriorny of K. FRANK COK BRANDS 1 his Near 

1 .1 » fertilizers whose OOlf commendation is a "cut' m price. 
Beware of those fertih/xrs whom > 

E^rr^r^--^ XiM. 

materials. 

said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of ^^ J^ 
Exoeriment Station: "The Value of a fertilizer to he 

Ser depends - - * - -£■*- |- £ *?■ - «>° n th « 

character of the materials used to maKe it. 

The superior character of the materials used Ifl E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty tears use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

Insi st upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, aot 

something said to be "just as good. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 



[Mae sftar 166 new men had been 
given rites for the first time. I felt 

thai it would serve I good purpose in 

warning such men as to the necessity 

f gf«at eare in using rilles. I felt 
that vou were co-operating with my 

department for the best Interests of 

all. 

| n Justice to the thirty! wo officers 

and four hundred men in the regi- 
ment I wiah to ht Mr. Leave** know 

that he can't find a better set of olli- 
B nd men if he goes into every 
College in the United States: that the 
Officers keep the \ery best of disci- 
pline mid that the spirit among the 
men is such that 1 am proud of the 
regiment in all r SpSOtS and that r.K, 

of there would resent the pointing of 
:i rifle sa soon as he would 

It may interest Mr. LeareOS to 

know that the first thing that is done 
before the beginning of each drill and 
the laat thing to be done at the end 
of a drill is to ••open chambers and 
magazine*" to see that nothing is left 
in the rifle and that thk same thing is 
don« whenever ali\oiie takes a rifle to 
._;,, to Ihe target range. No one lias 
a rifle at any timccvep! for drill and 

when going out for target practice. 

|l M ,a\ al>o Interest him to know 
that last \«ar three men were put on 
probation for firing a blank cartridge 
and threatened with suspension. 
Also OK man has been put OB proba- 
tion thi> year for same offence. Per- 
sonally I am more afraid of the ••un- 
loaded" rifle than the loaded one 
During the seven yean I ha\e been 

here I have nerei seen any cadet 

point a rifle at another and inyolliecis 
MMirS me fhat they have not 1 am 
sorrv that you did not report to me 
the cadet or cadets you saw doing this 

thing that they might ha\c been 

properlv disciplined. 

I know that you wish to be fair and 
that vou wish the columns of the 
Mosv'i to to be. SO 1 feel that you 

will in some wav gi\<- Mr. Leavens a 
I ,,,„. picture of therer* high standing 

o| tli.' eadet regiment hen. due 

entirely to a very line body of cadel 

o Hirers who are in commando!' as tine 
;i l,,„|s of Students Si one would wish 
to know 

I shall take pleasure, as soon SS I 
eaa get Mr. Learens address, in writ- 
ing him and telling him how careful 
ire reallv an' with our rifles and also 
i- showing him how highly the regi- 
ment at this institution is rated by 

those who have Inspected same. 

Yours very truly. 

GbO. C M aim in. 

» Captain l'. S. Army, retired. 



President Kernald called a meeting 
Of the freshman elass recently, but 
between the new uniforms. the 
hygiene qui/., and the final result of 

the world's series, little was Accom- 
plished. Tim meeting adjourned in 
disorder. 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



At college life last Wednesday 

lll() rning. Professor llieks urged iq 

,|,e freshmen the necessity of going 
ont for some eollege Spott, and 
".licking" to it. II.' discussed all 

tht , benefits to be desired fro* soch 

aetion. 



THE CAMPAIGN AT M. A. C. 

Another tumuluoiis week of cam- 
paigning has gone by and the campus 
has resounded with the arguments of 
the Pull Moosers. Wilsonites nnd 
Taftites. bast Wednesday after 
assembly the herculean task of run- 
ning three political meetings at once, 
in she same room of the same build- 
ing without the aid of police or militia 
accomplished when the three 
clubs met for deliberation in tin 
Chapel. There was a slight disturb- 
ance caused by the struggles of the 

Moosers ami rTitaonites to gain pos- 
sessloa of the body of one l uckles s 

progressive who was being forcibly 
Converted to the standard of the tiv, 
trader. Having secured the body the 
progressives returned to their seat - 
in triumph and proceeded to the elec- 
tion of a board of directors consisting 
Of Murray. Jordan and Porden '18. 
Meanwhile the Wilson men in the 
other side of the room had elected 
Core '18, president ; Van Zwalenburg 
'18, vice-president ; Pellett'l I. SOOn 
tarv ; Freeborn 'II. treasurer. 

The Taft forces met in the rear of 

th,. room and headed their oflfebl 

list with Ka.\ '13 as president, 
and Davies '11 as secretary. Tla 

Taft asm saj thej have no use f« 

a treasiirei . 

The Wilson men claim that they 

have already won OM Pull Mooser tD 

their ranks. In default of com: 

evidence, their statement has be, n 

branded as a --malicious ami wilful 

faUehood" and arrangements mad< 

for their entile membership to .ntei 

the Ananias dub. 

The progressives, as last week. 

*till lea. I in iiiniil.eis. enthusiasm ami 

••pep." GriggS, vice-president an-l 

.Jordan director of the Pull HoOM 

dub. left for Boston, Saturday, to 

attend a meeting of delegates from 

UM college progressive dubs ill th« 

state. Thirty-lhe men wen- pre- 

representing ten colleges, ■HHhuas, 

Amherst and Clark being the oth, 1 
colleges from Western Massachusetts 
to be represented. After some flhv 
tlMlInn at the state head.|iiarteis a 
permanent federation wasfonned aid 
Ihe following oflicers elected I 

Wait of M. I- T. president. Kjell- 
ttrom of P. I • law school vice-presi- 
,lent.N.Po<.sevcltof llarvanl. nephew 
of Col. Poosevelt, se.rctary ami 
treasurer. 

Prof. P. .1. .Johnson of Harvard 
addressed the meeting and plans WSW 
made for an active campaign by the 

college men. The Pull Moose plsns 

for M. A. C. contemplate a joint rally 
with the Amherst club with some «>t 
the state caudi«lates for speakeis. 
The M. A. C. progressive eld 
now the largest college club 
its kind in Mnssachusetts. 



f 



•11. —Poland IP Patch hi rt 

tered in the graduate school of < " 
IH .|1 university, where he will 
{graduate work in floriculture as »reD 
as be an assistant in tlori.ui 
helping Prof. A. C. Peal. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

1 vro.Moi o<;y. 

The Appalachian mountain club 
of Boston, visited Amherst on Satur- 
day and daring their stay examined 
the zoologicd and entomological col- 
lections of the college. 

Some specimens of the interesting 
insect Stenopalmatun bare recently 
been added to the insect collection. 

A course in entomological readings 
in Ccrtnan for graduate students |i 
being arranged for the spring 
-einester. 

At the last session Of the entomo- 
logical journal dub. Dr. (J. C. 
( rainpton gave an account of the 
proceedings of the second interna- 
tional congress of entomology which 
lie attended at Oxford. Kngland. in 
August. 

1 1 ORB 1 1 11 1:1 . 
Members of the junior ami senior 
classes in floriculture made a trip 
tinder the leadership of Professor 
White to Cromwell and Hartford, 
Conn., on Saturday. At Cromwell, 
the party I n s p ec t e d the range of A. 
\ Pearson where Peers '12 and < .a- 



THE NORTHHlUPTON PLAYERS 

Academy of Musk 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 21 



(. 



THE DEEP 
PURPLE" 

Prices 25c, 50c and 75c 



MATINEE WED. AND SAT. 

Prices 25c and 50c 



K>TAMI.iaHBI> IMI»U 

Si i.p ii ion Lank Fol»ossbi 

M*NUKA< , II'H1 No JKWKI.I l< 

ISO IIKOADWA Y. XKW YoWls 

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IK) lioyltton St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



Toem Mientka 

snoes suited and Polished 

Mak ; old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
°1 • n Sunday Main St. 

On way to Post Office. 



kell '12 are employed. In Hartford 

the leading retail llorists were visited, 
giving fhe men an aspect of the eom- 
inereial side of floriculture. 

ANIM \l III -IHM'KV. 

The stock judging team with Pro- 
•>r McLean goes to Chicago ne\t 
week to compete in the National 
dairv show. The team will meet Ihe 
pick of the agriciiltinal colleges of 
the West and middle West, share 
being 18 colleges represented last 
Near. Anions the SMUIJ pi 'i/es and 

trophies tobeasrarded are three $400 

seholaiships. The team will he the 
same thai went to Procktoii : Mae- 

Dongall. Lnndgren ami r*renoh. 

This trip is made possible through the 

Ames scholarship prise vhieh in<>- 

vides ?P"iO to pav the 8X00001 M of 

the three hest men in stock judging 
to the dairv show . 

i-oi run in -i; worn . 
vend additions were made to the 
poultry plant during the summer, 
(hie new building l Iz80,waa put up. 
nam in<.. 

A ten-ton aiiinioni:i compressor for 
making artilical ice is being installed 
in Flint lal>oi:itorv. Tin- plant will 
have a e:ip;icit\ foi one ton of i< 
dav. ami it i- • -\pected that this ice 
will he used in the drinking water 
use. I in the dining hall and in other 
departments of the O oUeg l 

ALUMNI NOTES 
New York (luh hampiet Saturday, 

( 1. 1 v.th. at 7 r a in the hotel 

Martinique. 
''.•I- — The sympathy of his cl»ss- 

matcs and other oollegS friends is ex- 
tended to Parley £. DavlaofOranby, 

whose wif«- died in a Springfield hos- 
pital Sept. i'C. Mrs. I lav is win* a 
sifter of Ahertus .1. Morse. '*.» I of 
Northampton. 

"'.I.*.. - Staph— P. Toole who h:.- 

done much work for Dr. ('•. K. Stone, 
and tree warden of Amherst, re- 
ports some important faet* relating 
to the chestnut tree hlight. lie finds 
a new liorcr, which has injured mauv 
of the trees within the town limits. 

Specimens irers iiamlnod by Df« IP 

(J. Kernald and found to he Peptnia 

sebra, Uhsefa sre eomn in wctem 

New York, hut not pre\ioiis|\ ob- 
served III Massachusetts. ThS pest 
:- v\orking ill SMUty trees in this viein- 
itv which arc also alTccted hv the 
chestnut tree hlighl. The fungus 

■ lot- not appear except in connection 

with the borer. From this fact it i* 
inferred fhat the fungus cannot thrive 

except after llie tree h.is Iteeli ciiten 

hv this pest. A remedy suggested, 

is to destroy the borers and thus keep 
the trees in good condition. 

•;i.-, — Barbell !>• Hemenaray hi 
the author of a chapter in a large 
and at trac ti v e bulletin on "apple 
growing" published by the State 

hoard of ag.ieiilture. The same 
hulletiu contains chapters by Prof. 
Sears, Prof. Waugh. Dr. Stone and 
Dr. Fernald. 



e\-':i7. F. I). Palmer has sold 

out his bicycle and motorcycle husi- 

ness in Florida and has purchased a 
live acre orange and lemon ranch at 

Upland, California. 

"!>'.». Puletin No. 106 Pureau of 
Out. "The Fife llistorv and Piono- 
mies of Some North American 
Fishes" hv W. A. Hooker ':•'... F. c. 

Bishop and IF P. Wood M7 under 
the direction of W. I). Hunter was 

iss||e<l Sept. 7. 191 '_'■ 

'o(i. - Dr. Ralph I>. Gilbert, \iec- 

plcsidellt of Powkel Insecticide 

coiiipiinv. has recently announced 

iiis engagement to Miss Helen w. 
Ryder of Bellows Falls. Yt. lie ex- 
pects to he married soon :tiid will 
live in Pelmoiit. Sphere he is I. uilding 
a house. 

-il.— Dr. C.F .Cordon attended the 
-ledicalion of Ihe New \><\\ state 

education building at Albaaj on 

\\ . dm Sday, Oct. 16th, ami was pres- 
ent at ihe dinner gtreu by Dr. John 

M.Clark to the New York ideologi- 
cal siii v. \ st:i(T of which he i 

m e mber . 

•(•7. Clifford P Thompson i- 
turning to his dome in Hahfa\. from 
Selama. Pei:ik. Malav . where he has 

been amnagei ot a mbher plantation. 

II. sxpectatOgel home iii Noveinlici. 
"o7. < . radiiutOS and former SS 

ben of the daas aim <h<i art eon- 

trihute to the (lass letter mav ob- 
tain topics of the saSSS from the 
tarv upon payment of the ta\ 

vhieh Win* levieil at tin 
!in- last .lime to diis sad 

other sz| 

Lai Ku.i Lbunj has bo I 

made \ k . Minister of agri<ultuie 
ami forestrv in th.' uewChinese |{e- 
puhlic and has begsn the issue of 
ihe ••Chinese Agi ieiiltural .loiirnal." 

I. — O. P. I ' trans- 

ferreil from tin P- .-ton to the Palti- 
Bjore division of the Powki'i In- 
Olds compaiiv and has heen BSSdS | 

end manager. II 
rotary for the class of 1606, Id- 
dress il 17 Paik Heights Ave., Bui- 

timore. Md. 

'111. I.oliis C. Prown is elllploved 
I.V the I'.o-toli clev.ited I .nil <»:nl 

cotnpanv n\ e yoi . 

'lo. B. IF Til r is the iiistrue- 

hM in hottieiilliire :it Vermont state 

school of agriculture, Randolph 
Center, Vermont. 

'11 — Ooataf A. Nielsen was in 
Amherst a few davs List vv . . k His 
address is now :!."» Wchstei St.. \\ . -t 
Newton. 

'II Sluigis M. Poliinson is a 
senior at ( olliell. DoMott who was 

a ••special" at M \i. r ^ r i<*' in IU10-1 I is 
a classmate. 

ex-'llf — -I. Roaenbaum is doing 

work in plant patbologj f"i the de- 
of doctor of philosophy from 
Cornell university. He graduated from 
Cornell in I '.'I 1. Just now he is in- 
v estimating the disease of ginseng 
for the U. S. government. 



TU*IM 
F4US 

/ \ NIL 




otrnr MAr ey 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 



CAP e5s GOWNS 

I <> tlir \inri M in < lollegssfroBi ihe At- 
lantic lo ihe Facitn CISM ContracU S 
Specially 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic PIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chsfd only from r A. M. to 4 A. M. 



The College Signal, Tuesday^ctober 22, » 9 »». 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND DOLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 
DEUEL'S 



t 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



rORTYSIXTh YE/\R 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



E. E. M1LLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground white you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin. Banjo, Mandolin NiMN MMMM 

AMHKKST, MASS. 

Next to Post Office. 



For a catalog of complete information, addr, M 



DRUG STORE KENYO n l. B utte*f,eld. prudent 



Aiiil>fr«t. »***••« 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Iligh-Gradc College Work 
LAUNDRY 

Shirts. - • _ "fjg 

p£ n wash, - 48c per do, 

Samcn.ugh.lry, - - 30c per do/. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Suam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $150 a hu,! 

■ w M I. iOBMW, Agent. 7 North Cottage 
Ki'WAKt. C. Ki.wakI's. Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 

UIHERST BOOK STORE 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone V*-* 

GAS PI I TING. TINNING. 

F. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Leai> Liohts, &c. 
a Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



Wright & iMtMOti 

Catalogues of 

Kr ill «e Winter Oocscls* 

. !-.>.»» mailed to any address. Collest- 
A .M >U . ^ At loU-V who want the re*l. »«per.... 



Athletic Board, 
IV College Be eeto, 

Football Association, 
Baseball Association. 
Truck Association, 
Hockey Association. 

Tennis mMMmMMM, 

Biflc dob, 

Roister DoMHM 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred reerteen Index, 

M. A. ( . Christian Association, 
M. A. C Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference. 
Mockbridgc Club, 



QgOMft H. CiMMMMs, Secretary 

F. D. Grigge, Pteetdeef 

.1. W. Co\ill. Manager 
L. Edgar Smith, Manager 

K. H. Ceeper, Mam.. 
W. S. little, Manager 
C. Boketaed, Manager 
.1. W. T. Linen, Ueoreterj 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

.1. I). French. Manager 

G. Jaedeteoe, Meeefei 

K. S. Clark, .lr., Manager 

!..<;. Davics, President 

j. L Mas... President 

W. s. Little, Presidenl 

A. F. HeDongnll, President 



SkafgShoes 
Sweaters 

Jsrssys 

Uniforms 
for all sports 

Wright i I'.tson (iood. are the Mandar-t Ml 
all sport* 

wmioht at ■>■ -rasosw 

MlWatMagtasflt. mmMMMm 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort 
ment of pennants and banners 

Cl KK AN * DYER, Props. 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Qulrkr.t fcervlc*. H*-t Work. iMMMMl MM 

All »o.k carefully done. Work Mg-*£ a* 
delivered. <.*nt»' overcoats, suits, pani 
coats Ladies' hoe linen suit. I specials 



Men Fitti ng Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets. Lets. Pillow Cases. Comfortables. 

Towels, Etc. Also denims tor 

that corner seat. 

J A CKSON & CUTLER __ 



Teams will call every day at M. A. C 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Hear Nash ll.'k, Amherst. 



Tel No. JM-s 



CARS 



Leave AOGIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 
TELEPHONE— 300. 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till 1. o'clock KVEKY night 
Corner Amity «nd P!e*.»nt Street. 



CARS 



If you w»nt to be 

NOI.II. WITH TIIK "litis 

you must have your clothe. ,.re» e-l and cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 

D Amity st. M — - *' 0re 

Preeetng -n«» <B£&2Z£ttr~m in town 
Tel. 30,1-11 



Leave AMHERST for AQUIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 •"<» ** mln ' pMt im 
HOUR. 

Special Car. «t ReaeoiwM* R«te« 



nlHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. It. CO 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers^ 

UNIFORMS 

W For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer me r t. %,""' 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 

«-~- " Go,d Medal Uni, ° r r^iudeiphia. fa.1*-* » *-» *>■ w " i: >*- 

1404-1426 Chestnut St., Km,aB ' I 



Springfield Republican 

A NEWSl'APKK THAT MMJCATM 

The Republican gives the best repel 
Agricultural College and Aml»>r« 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX111. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 29. 1912. 



No. 7 



DUAL CROSS COUNTRY RUN NEW YORK ALUMNI MEET PHI KAPPAPH1 ELECTIONS 



Won by M. A. C, a6-ig. Hsyden of 
Vermont Individual Winner. 



Large Gathering at Hotel Martinique 
Saturday Evening. 



M. A C. scored a decisive victory 
MM the University of Vermout in 
the five mile cross country run In Id 
over the Sunderland course, Saturday 
afternoon. The race was closely 
contested all the way. Among the 
leaders, the greater part of the 
"Aggie" team finished closely 
bunched. The time of Hayden, tin- 
winner was 2«m. lOsec , which is 
very good considering the condition 
of the roads which were muddy from 
recent rains. 

The start was made about 4-15 
from a point on the Sunderlaud road 
exactly five miles from tl»»- OTOM 
wald. The men running for M. A. 
C, were Captain Whitney 'It, Ba- 
ker '13, Hutchings It, Shirley '14 
and Richards It. Those running for 
Vermont were Aldridi. M inkier, 
Hayden, Tennier and Jones. 

The field kept well bun. bed for the 
first half mile and then began to 
string out. At the eud of the first 
mile the leaders were Whitney M. 
A. C, Baker M. A. C. aud JoMe 
U. of V., running abreast with the 
-t of the field strung out a huiidre.l 
is in the rear. These positions 
were held until they reached ■ point 
about two miles from North Amb< Ml 
when Jones <»f Vermont, and Itieh- 
artls, M. A. C. worked up from the 
rear, setting a fastei pace for the 
leaders. ,r,u relative positions of 
the leadei ;r 'his l»oint were Whit- 
ney, Hay« £> 'ones, Richards, Shir- 
ley, Hute and Baker. 

Haydet i took the lead, run- 

ning stro I id increased the pMfl 
materially Q . North Amherst, the 
leaders' w aS lajden Vt. Richards 

M. and y ^y M -i wnil1 ' • l " 1 " "** 

unable to d the pace fell !>:»< k 

with the second bunch. From there 
the long, up-hill grind to the home 
-tretch began, with Hayden still in 
the lead. < losely followed by Rich- 
ards, Whitney and Jones who tiegan 
again to work his way up from the 
rear. This order was maintained 
until the top of the grade was readied 
near the experiment stations when 
Whitney having set a fast DMtf 
up to this time, dropped back. He 
was replaced by Hutchings who was 
tinning strong and came up from the 
i in a fine spurt, pushing Jones of 
Vermont who had about reached his 
niit. 

A crowd of 150 was at the cross 
walks to greet the runners who fin- 
lied in the following order. 
The score : 

Vermont. M. A. C. 
Hayden, U of V 9 

Richards, M. A. C. 8 

[Continued on page 4J 



Announced. Prof. C. E. Marshall De- 
livers Address at Assembly. 



Fifty-nine alumni and guests sat 
down at the JTtti annual reunion of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege club of New York at the Hotel 
Martinique. Saturday evening and 
although not the largest gathering in 
the UstOCJ of the club it will go down 
a8 one of the most ei.joysible. 
Twenty-live classes were represented 
nMjbMj in MM f"»"i I pioneer of '71 
to a delegation of four from '11 

The menu card gotten up by Dr. J. 
A. Cutter 'H'2. the secretary, read as 
follows : 
Symposium: Agriculture and T»M- 

poilation. 
Svmposiarch : Daniel Willard 

president of the Baltimore and 
Ohio B R. 
DjMJIIlMMWlT Kenyon L Butterlield 
L, I.. D.. President of M A. 
C. ; Kr.deri. k D Cndeiw.Hsl. 
Pn^idciit of the Krie H. R. and 
Chailo H. QlMty, 'ditor of (he 
Raltimore S>n,. 
ChoregUM Kxtraordinary : H. C 
Hookef of the Krie R. R. 
After J J T'Ht td :t " i, ' ,l, 

meal, the bampietors withdrew for a 
time, the tables were desired, n. 
HgMad and at Ml HmM Willard 
>.-. DTMSOMMI of the elub and toast- 
MMl for the evening, intr.di, 
IVesideiit Uuttertidd as a man who 
enjoys the universal MWM* :, " ,1 
a<lmir:itionof Is.th alumni and un.lei- 
gradnatcs. In well chosen words 

,.ient n.itteiiieid nyiMiii bis 

enjoyment of the OMMlM and felici- 
tated the dub on the gathering. 
Touching lightly upon the history Of 
the eollege. the strong MM it MM 
turned out, and the recent legislatlM 
1 1 < .iil.lt*. he took MMMM loemphasi/e 
the purpose of the institution as an 
agricultural institution thai should 
train men efficiently for life work. 
••1 believe'" said the president in coli- 

cliision "that todajf M. A. C. is face 
to face with the tireatest crisis in M* 
|,i>tor\. To be Hiire, our enrollment 
is increasing ami our appropriations 
are likewise JMMMMMf, bM the fact 
IMMMM that we fa<-e the crisis. W. 
,an never expeet to risal in size the 
,1 -rtmtl ntiiveisiti.> of the West 
hnt we Ml t i vm! 01 cxi el them in 
M ualitv . To do that we must have 
inun.-y and an a-lequate amount of it. 
Ipon the answer to our demand for 
it hingesoiir fate; either we bold our 
place as a first class institution or we 
drop back to second place. Private 
support as well as state aid is neces- 
sary. Our needs outstrip the capacity 
of the state appropriations. In five 



At tin- Wednesday asseml.lv the 
entire time was given OM W 1''" 
Kappa l'hi. 1W. .lames A. Koord 
Bfl -i.led. He gave a brief sketch of 
l'hi Kappa Thi, outlining its history 
and purposes and giving the chapter 
role. Uefore introducing the speaker 
he announced the .'lection of three 
seniors to the fraternity. TfctJ Ml 
All.e.t .1. Kdlev. Ke>ei II .Van Zwal- 
uweuburg. and Harry \N Allen. 
There will be additional elections at 
-pring meeting. 
Dr C. K. Marshall, head of the 
luate Bchool and professor of 
microbiology, delivered the address. 
His subject was "The Sciential in 
Agi .culture." He MMM by saying 
that "freshmen" are generally mHMmJ 
to .1.. what th.v Ml MM I 90 Ml ImI 
accepted the task of delivering the 
address altnough he felt as thOMjl :« 
Letter speaker mi^Wt ha\e heen din 
That MM fens MM unfounded 
was proven \>\ the MMMM»MJ| way in 
which he developed his subject He 
showed that the fanner uses science 
every da\ in MOfJ brunch of mM 
wor U ; being the iMMMMfttt 

ih. truth ami not merely the stmly of 
the -o-called -dcntil'ic sul.j.-cts. As 
an example of MM fanuei'-. use of 
hit. he explained how he musl 
Htudv the MMMM obtained by other 
men and b\ experim.nt stations and 
then determine for himself, l.y scien- 
tific methods, how he must act nndei 
somewhat, but not exaetlv similar 
drcumstaiiceM. 



NEW PLAY CHOSEN 

Last week the mMMMMMMI «>f MM 
Hoister Doisters tlee ide.l to abandon 
the pi.Mluction Of '"Bachelor's Bott- 
e\moon" an<l substitute a HUM MCt 
farce comedy by Arthur Law, enti- 
tled --'nie New Boy.'" The cast 8B 

chosen for MM lirst |.lay will remain 
inUut and rehearsals on I he new pro- 
dmtion begin tonight. 

At a meeting of the society on 
Thursday it was voted to ghrt :■ clas- 
sical play, piobably one of the QroM 
.liamas, «luring commemeuient week. 



t Continued on P«ce 3] 



Manager Cov ill and Coach EmMM 
lire actively pushing the protest 
entered against the score of the \ M - 
mm, nt football MMM. I'lf matter has 
bOM brought to the attention of Mi 
C. Linn Seiler, <hairman of the inter- 
collegiate rules committee in Phila- 
delphia. Disregard of the rules con- 
cerning disqualification is the princi- 
pal ground for complaint and there is 
good chance of the protest being 
sustained. 



ANOTHER TIE SCORE 

In Game with the •Purple". Close and 
Exciting Game Ends 6-6. 

In a brilliant contest, replete with 
dashing plays the Massachusetts 
"Aggiec" fOttgbl Holy Cross to a I 8 
tic ill the annual MMM i<l Pitton 
Field last Saturday. From the very 
IffM play the MMM promised to be an 
interesting one and especially so to 
"Aggie" supporters. The Vale play 
Of calliii<i the tackles and ends back 
bofOTC each play deceived Holv Cross, 
offered a spectacular gMMM and soon 
enabled the visitors to march down 
the licld ami across the purple's goal 
line for a score. Not until late in 
the liual period did I Inly Cross suc- 
ceed in tieing the MMM, :»n«l failure 
to kick tin- goal from touchdown p re- 
vented a victory for each team. 
1,'cpeatedly MMMg MM gMM MM Holy 
t'ross backs could make hut little im- 
piessi.i the Aggie line and the hit- 
ter's better team work was also a re- 
still of Dr. Brides' line coaching. 

During the lirst half the game was 
constantly in favor of the stale eol 
lege and al one lime when the team 
was within its opponent's 10-yard 
line, I forward pass was tried, 
ilon was waiting behind the goal 
id though Irving hard to 
receive the pass, be was MMOOMftoUi 

Mocked. In the second half A^; 
plaved I InfMatn gMM MMMOl 

.utiielv. It f id new problems to 

solve when .liffereiit bewildei in- 
plays were MMMg ''. v !l l,,w MMMM> 
hack and when Captain OOMIglMl 
ma.ie his tiisi appearance in hcrim- 
mage since the Harvard game. This 
sterling player not only assumed the 
l.mdcn of the otVeiisive game, but 
instilled new spirit into his team, 
until their tierce attack and shifting 
|,la\s kept the ball M Aggie's danger 
zone JmIMJ the last few minutes of 

the game. A repetiti >f Aggie's 

attempt to score on a forward ]> 
occurred at this time hut Ostergreu 
was in turn successfully blocked while 
waiting for the pass directly behind 
the gool MMMk l'»i ward passes were 
tried frequently by l>otli teams, and 
tWO Were .level ly executed for long 
gMMl bj MMM MMM. The game total- 
Id tfj plays. 

Holv Cross received MM opening 
kick-off but was soon forced to punt, 
for Iheii return of the kick-off netted 
them but B yards. In the first rush 
Orillin tackled allowing only a :'.-yard 
igain. Holy Cross went offside on 
the next play gaining only a yard and 
Brewer's tackle held the next play. 
Got*, then received the punt but could 
make no gain. 

Brewer now carried the ball five 



I yards for Massachusetts, Graves 






The College Signal. Tuesday, October 29, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 29. »9 12 - 



* 



iiiadt- lirst down, and Smith's 3-yard 
gain made another first down. In 
two rushes Brewer netted la yards. 

Smiiihui) added two, then Smith punted 
and Samson nailed the back in his 
tracks, (irillin broke up the play 
and tackled for a loss and Kdgerton 
allowed but 1 yards on au end run. 
Boll Cross now tried a centre rush 
but made absolutely no gain. The 
punt was n-cched by Smith and he 
was tackled before he could start. 
This sort of work whb characteristic 
of tbe ends on both teams during the 
greater part of the game. 

Two rushes for Aggie produced 
only a -2-yard advance but (Jraves 
then made first down by tearing 
through for 15 yards. A forward 
pass was then tried but it failed. 
Time was called after the next play 
and the referee penalized Aggie 5 
y anls because a center line man car- 
ried the ball. The team then pro- 
ceeded to make up the distance by I 
M-yard gain on a forward pass to 
Melican. The procession continued 

as Graves added B yards and Bras/eft 

offering made first down. Here Ib>ly 
Cross made a last stand scrimmaging 
on her .Vvard line, and the next rush 
netted no gain. The next down 
found BreWSf 9 yardl nearer the goal 
with the ball. QOIS called for a full 
back shift and Brewer carried the ball 
over the line on a fake kick forma- 
tion ; Dole missed the goal. 

Holy Cross again received the kick- 
off ami ran it back 10 yards. Throe 
yards were made through centre but 
an end run netted no gain. Another 
end play netted 100 yard* and first 
down. Again (oitlin broke through 
and tackled the runner for a loss, but 
the next play asttsd BoJjJ < ross ." 
yards on a forward pass. 

The quarter ended with the ball on 
M. A. C's 88-yard line. 



SK.COM> vl AIM I 1: 

In the second period Holy Cross 
succeeded in making first down again 
but the ball eventually changed hands 
when Holy Cross failed to complete a 
forward pass. 

(Jraves now pinned through for !) 
yards. Smith was tackled for a loss, 
Graves again made I yard, Brewer 
three, and Smith's punt was only 
returned -l yards, Melican getting the 
tackle. In four downs Holy Cross 
made only '< yards and (lore who 
received the punt ran it back 5 yards 
throwing off two tacklers. 

The first play at right end pro- 
duced no gain and Graves was injured 
in his 4-yard contribution. At this 
point Millikeu for Holy Cross 
replaced Lee at fullback and he with 
O'Brien featured for Holy Cross in 
the backfield during the rest of the 
game. 

When play resumed Brewer made 5 
yards and first down. "Kid" Gore 
worried his opponents with a 12 yard 
gain and Kdgerton handled a forward 
pass cleverly for a 15-yard gain and 
first down. Brewer tore through on 
a splendid boring rush which netted 



8 yards but necessitated time out for 
his injury. Smith made first down. 
Two short gains followed, showing 
that Holy Cross was fighting stub- 
bornly under the shadow of her goal 
posts. Forward passes had worked 
successfully for M. A. C. in the 
game and Kdgerton stood waiting 
behind the goal posts for another but 
the purple players succeeded in break- 
ing up the play. 

The ball went out to the purple but 
its team could not gain consistently 
and when Gore received the ball he 
returned it :i yards. 

The next few plays gave little 
advantage to either team and the half 
ended with a punt fumbled and recov- 
ered by (lore. 

TH1K1» yUAHTEK. 

Holy Cross kicked off to M. A. C. 

and Kdgerton returned the ball 10 

yards. Two rushes by Brewer earned 

4 yards, but the third down gave no 

gain and Smith's punt was carried in 

about :t yards. The first rush for 

Holy Cross found the maroon line 

unyielding, ami, moreover, the pur- 

p|g wa> penalized 5 yards for holding 

An end run found Brewer waiting for 

the runner who was thrown for a loss. 

God fumbled the punt but rec-vered. 

A bad session followed for Aggie. 

Brewer made no gains, Smith was 

thrown for a loss, a forward pass was 

not completed ami Smith's punt was 

blocked and recovered by Holy Cross. 

No gain in two rushes was a renewed 

indication of good work in the 

maroon line and a forward pass was 

intercepted by Smith. 

Brewer now made 6 yards. Graves 
1, Smith failed to gain but Brewer 
added three more yards. On the 
punt Samson laid the man low ss 
the ball was rasaffSSt Milliken 
plunged for »'. yards, and the next 
play found Nissen in Graves* posi- 
tion, the latter retiring on account of 
injuries. 

In three more plays Holy Cross 
gained but »', yards and the punt which 
followed was a low diagonal kick 
which went out of bounds. It was 
now Aggie's ball on its 25-yard line, 
and since eOfJJSSteat rushing of the 
ball did not follow Smith punted and 
Kdgerton tackled as soon as the ball 
was received. 

Holy Cross broke through for 9 
vards, was held on the second rush 
but made lirst down on the next play. 
A- they were making another 5 yard 
gain the whistle announced the end 
of the third period. 



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I <>\ KTH l'KUIOD. 

Captain Ostergren, who had been 
out of games on account of injuries, 
insisted on going in during the last 
quarter and from the first rush, his 
team acted like a different aggrega- 
tion. The Holy Cross stands, up to 
this time noticeably silent, had plenty 
of opportunity to show enthusiasm, 
and Aggie's game became almost 
entirely defensive. 

Tbe ball was put into play by Holy 
Cross on M. A. C's 45 yard line. 



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Their determination to advance the 
ball waH very evident from the first 
rush which gave them l<> yards. 
The second yielded three and Milli- 
ken followed it up by a 20 yard run. 
M. A. C. solved the next play which 
yielded only two yards, but the 
purple's quarterback had a new play 
up his sleeve. Calling on Ostergren 
the taekle responded by a spectacular 
end ruu clear across the field. Had 
he nut been forced out of bounds a 
touchdown would have been scored 
right there, for weak tackling MttbM 
him to throw off one tackier after the 
other. 

The next play resulted in advanc- 
ing the ball from the Ifi yard to the 
10 yard line and on the next play a 
touchdown was scored. Holy Cross 
punted out for goal— kicking ix.si- 
tion. Milliken failed to kick the 
goal. 

O'Brien's energetic kick off went 
over the goal posts and the ball was 
put in play on M. A. C's M yard 
line. Hrewer made fi yards but his 
team sustained a penalty of live 
yards. No gain, and a fumble in the 
two plays following forced Smith to 
punt, and Melican, failing to see the 
signal for a fair catch, tackled the 
player. A 10 yard penalty followed 
a short gain by Ostergren. Again 
two yards were made through the 
Aggie line, then Ostergren carried 
the ball to the two yard line. 

Not wishing to risk the Aggie line 
11 at this position, quarterback 
McCaffrey called for a forward pass, 
tad Ostergren. though waiting direct- 
ly behind the goal posts, muffed it. 

A i»enalty of five yards offset any 
gain M. A. C. could make in the 
in \t four downs and on Smith's punt 
the ball was returned 10 yards. The 
opponents tried two forward passes 
in succession after a five-yard plunge, 
but the first failed to gain, and the 
second was not completed. On the 
fourth down Oritfln smeared the play, 
throwing the back before he had 
started with the ball. 

When the ball exchanged hands 
M. A. C. failed to make any sub- 
stantial gains and the game ended 
with Holy Cross in iiossession of the 
ball, but its players in no condition 
to advance it. 
The line-up : 



Hol.Y CROSS. 

iirett, McCabe, le 
Pickett, Ostergren, It 
V'ogel, Quinn, lg 
lirawley, I)e Marco, c 
< ahiil, rg 

Davitt, Ostergren, rt 
Metevier, re 



M. A. c. 

re, Melican 

rt. Baker 

rg, (Jriffin 

c, Dole 

Jg, Eisenhaure 

It, Samson 

le, Kdgerton 



' armody, Carey, McCaffrey, qb qb, Gore 
O'Brien, lhb rhb, Hrewer 

I.ee, Milliken, rhb Ihb, Smith 

Donovan, fb fb, Graves, Nissen 

Score— Holy Cross 6, M. A. C. 6. 
■ hdowns— Brewer, Milliken. Goals 
cd-Dole, Milliken. Referee— Mc 
rath of Boston college. Umpire— Pow 
- of Worcester high school. Linesman 
Dowd of Colgate. Time-13-minute 
riods. 



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On *r*e> Qoa^a^a' 



D. W. O'Brien '14, of Wayland, 
M pledged Kappa Gamma Phi. 



NEW YORK ALUMNI MEET 

[Continued from flr»« p«g«l 

vears we must have another chemical 
laboratory ; I new drill hall and gym- 
nasium project has been filed by 
Capt. Martin. It is to our alumni 
that we must look for the 1 11 t it 
of the new athletic field and the col- 
lege is now old enough to look confi- 
dently to the alumni for help in these 
matters." 

The toastmaster spoke of the ml 
man, Frederick I ). Inderwood, presi- 
dent of the Krie railroad, as a leader 
in the railroad profession, I graduate 
of the school of experience who had 
risen from biakeinan to president 
and had shown himself an honor man 
throughout. 

Mr. Underwood spokeon "Agricul- 
ture and Transportation" and in a 
talk replete with asides that aroused 
much laughter, he sketched the rise 
of agriculture and transportation, the 
twin arts by which commercial life is 
stimulated.' "Of the 10,000,000 
industrial workers," said Mr. Under- 
wood "80,000,000 are employed in 
the business of agriculture and trans- 
portation. Let these two languish 
and all activities languish, for thev 
are essential to the physical and com- 
mercial life of the country." Mr. 
Inderwood expressed himself as 
unable to understand how a state like 
Massachusetts could consider small 
appropriations for an institution of 
importance such as M. A. ('. 

Tin- last speaker of the evening. 
Charles II. Grasty of Baltimore was 
introduced as the editor and propri- 
etor of one of the ol.l. >t pap.i- in 
the country, the Baltimore San. 
Mr. Grasty «n- scheduled to talk on 
"Journalism ami Agriculture" but 
branched off somewhat and when he 
sat down his brilliant speech was 
applauded again and again. In the 
course of his rernarkB Mr. Grasty 
said "I must pay my respects to 
New Kuuland ; her agriculture may 
l»e poor hut I have always thought of 
her as the breeding place for men 
whom she immediately turns loose 
upon the country. In all the range 
of modern wonders 1 think of noth- 
ing moie wonderful than the 11. us- 
paper. It has made the whole woild 
a household— a newspaper household 
through its exchange of international 
news. The humblest citizen can 
afford a newspaper and can become 
through it a world citizen. I do not 
think the modern criticism of news- 
papers sincere. We find fault 
hecause it is the fashion. News- 
paper success is public confide m ••• 
earned by public service. Inevitably 
we come to a consideration of sensa- 
tionalism and suppression in news- 
papers. They are the twin vices of 
journalism but of the two, suppr. 
ion is the worse because it can la- 
made the servant of wealth and social 
condition. For that reason I am 
glad that our newspapers arc radical, 
that they report radical news. 
They are not afraid of giving the 



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1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 29, 191a. 












/ 



The College Signal, Toeaday, October 39, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
K. II.VAN/.WAI.I'.MU RG i ,.Kdit<>r in-Chief 
CHESTER E. WHEELER 'u.ManaitinsEditor 
OSCAR O. AMDER*ON 'i* AerfetaM Bdlt«M 
FREDERICK D. GRIGGS '13. Athletic Edlte* 
.s MILLER JORDAN '13. Athletic EdHot 
HAKRV W. All KN'l3. Alun.niMulitm 

STUART A POSTER '14. Department Kditoi 
EKVINE F. PARKER 'M. Alumni Editor 

HAROLD C SLACK '14. Campus Editor 

J, ALBEK 1 PRICE '15. As»ociate Editor 

GEORGE B. DOMMBLL '15. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE .xl.'i„ lius. Manager 
E RNEST S. CLARK, I R 'u- Asst Hus Manager 
ERNEST P.UPTON '14, Asst. Adv Manager 
MAURICE LCLOUOH'tJ, Circulation 

Subscription $1 50 per vear. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd. 



Entered «u 
Pom Off** 



matter it th« Amhm 



Vol. XXIII. Tt'FSDAV, OCT. 29 No. 7 



Lapt Harek it wah announced on 

good authority thai all-night lights 
were to be installed in the hallways 
of the dormitories and that adequate 
means of fin- proteetion was also to 
bt provided during tin- summer. It 
was implied that students r.ttu ninji 
this fall were to find the dormitories, 
if not abodes of luxury, at least edi- 
fices through whose halls one could 
prowl during post-midnight hours 
without the need of an aeeidelit pol- 
ity. During the summer extensive 
1. -pairs were made - in the olli.-es of 
the treasurer. No doubt the repair 
budget ran low, but the lighting 
of steep cellar stairways and the 
provision of bedroom tire-escapes 
is surely of more vital importaaci 
than the beautifying of the college 
banking offices. The dormitory 
dents ask only a square deal. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the.Sn.NAl. «" ile.ttn Harold C. Illack 

•i«, on or before Saturday preceeding each issue] 

Oct. II— €-41 P. m.. M. A. C. Chris- 
tian association in' chapel. 
I— FOOTBMd,. Tl'KTS at 
BEDFORD. 

3 — <M."» a. M.. Sunday chapel. 
Rev. Clarence I . Swift. Fall 
Kiver. pastor Central ( otigte- 
gntioual church. 
»', p, M., Hushing season closes. 
4 — H-10 \. m., Fledging of 
freshmen in chapel. 
5 — 7 cm., Room fl South Col- 
lege, Stoekhridge club. 

6 1-10 P. v.. Assembly. 

Dr. Sprague in charge. 



Elmer F. Hathaway '00, of Cam- 
bridge and Mis. Hathaway were vis- 
itors on the campus this past week. 

At a elaSS meeting held by the 
freshmen on Wednesday the commit- 
tee to draw up a class constitution 
was elected. 

The Tufts game is nearly here so 
prepare to follow the advice of the 
cheer leader if necessary and "hock 
tbost clothes", but be at the game 
anyway. 

Work has begun in the right direc- 
tion. A portion of every assembly 
after this is to be given over to mass 
singing under the direction of Mr.John 
Bland of New York, who is to lead the 
musical clubs. According to all re- 
ports of Mr. Bland's ability we should 
develop SOSM very good muss singing. 
L. <;. Darke '14, president of the 
M. A. C. Christian association, spent 
last Friday in Boston, where he at- 
tended I conference of Y. M. C- A.'s 
from all the New F.ngland colleges. 
He came back with many good ideas, 
which he will undoubtedly set forth 
at the next meeting of the associa- 
tion. Fveryone invited. 

Owing to the inclement weather 
Saturday, there were very few who 
undertook to clear the trail over the 
Holyoke range. The trail was to be 
cleared for the benefit of the Appa- 
lachian club of Massachusetts which 
went over the trail on Sunday. The 
trek to Mount Tobv and return to 
Sunderland for supper, which was 
arranged for the faculty, was also 
interfered with by the weather. 




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TEAM FOURTH AT CHICAGO 

Word came hint night from Chic- 
ago that the stock-judging team cou- 
nting of McDoiigall. French and 
Lundgren, with Prof. McEaine. had 
won fourth place in the stock-judging 

ite*t at the National dairy show 

from a held of eighteen t.ams In 
the Guernsey section, they received 
first place with individual honors, 
and will bring back a trophy and in- 
dividual medals. This make* them 
the highest team east of tin' Miss- 
issippi. 

At a meeting Tuesday night, the 
Mockbridge club listened to a very 
interesting account, by Mr. (Juaife. 
of his experiences and observations 
while on a trip through Europe this 
summer. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En 
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LOWKR EXPENSES Enable us 
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And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 

EW ELL'S 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The Wilson club attended Un- 
democratic rally in the Town hall, 
last week. 

James Wilson Dayton ' I :. of South 
Norwalk, Conn., has pledged Iieta 
Kappa Phi. 

"Keg" Morse is in our midst 
again. He is g"i"g to *•*■ l )OHt 
graduate work this year. 



"CAR AND BELLS" 

The Williams College Dramatic Club 



Presents 



DUAL CROSS COUHTRY 


RUN 


[Continued from 


page 1] 




3. Jones, U of Y 




7 




4. Hutchings, M. A. 


C 




6 


5. Whitney, 






5 


6. Shirley, 






4 


7. Baker, 






3 


8. Aldrich. U of V 




2 




9. Minkler, " 




1 




10. Tennier, " 




O 





Total, 19 26 

Officials— Starter— Larrabee '11. Re- 
feree _ Dickinson 'to. Judges — Dr. 
Stone U. of Vt., and Southwick '12. 
Timers— Cooper M. A. C. and Nelson 
U. of V. Clerk of Course— Kdwards 
'14. Distance : 5 miles. Time, 28.10. 



"HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR" 

A Three-Act Farce Comedy, by R. Marshall. 

SATURDAY EVENING 

At Northampton Academy of Music 

Tickets on Sale at Theater and " The Copper Kettle" 

Prices, - »1.50, *1.00, 75c, 50c 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

Holy Cross met its match Satur- 
day when Massachusetts played them 
to a tie on Fitton field, Worcester. 
It was an important game in many 
ways and the outcome wasn't far 
from satisfactsry. Last year Holy 
Cross managed to squeeze out a »'. to<» 
victory over Aggie and this year con- 
fidently expected to roll up a much 
larger score. As it was, the purple 
was lucky to get off with » tie. 

Massachusetts showed the greatest 
improvement of the season last Sat- 
urday. The team has Wen coming 
along fast during the last two weeks 
under the etlieient eoachiug of Ooaeh 
Brides. The shift plays are working 
letter every day. The baeklield 
that started Satin da v\ game had 
little trouble in finding the holes for 
good gains. Captain Samson and 
(.rillin wereespeeially strong in get- 
ting their opponents out of the way. 
The team got the jump on the home 
t,am and held the lead until the last 
half when Hoh Cross became desper- 
and finally succeeded in erosaing 
the line. 

The result of Saturday's game 
together with the result of the Vri- 
mont-Springfield college game at 
Burlington at the same time gives the 
first real ehanee for comparison 
l.etween the Aggie ami the Training 
school teams this vear. Holy CrOSS 
defeated the Springfield team by two 
touchdowns on Springfield's own field 
the week btfotl Vermont heat 

Massachusetts on a fluke but the 
teams were evenly matched. Last 
Saturday the Training school defeated 
Vermont 7 to 0. The touchdown 
was the result of a 50 yard run. 
otherwise the game was even 
throughout. 

Scores do aot tell a great deal in 
romparing teams. However, if these 
scores do mean anything, they show 
that the Aggies have improved con- 
siderably in the past week, and the 
same thing is probably true of the 
Springfield eleven. Even so, Massa- 
chusetts apparently has the battel 
in of the two and although the 
Springfield game is still more than two 
ks ahead the chance of a victory 
hasn't looked brighter in several 
years. 

Second only in importance to the 

Springfield game of all the games on 

the schedule, is next Saturday's 

M with Tufts at Medford. This 

the one game of the season that 

Boston alumni can attend in any 

large numbers. Last year the Aggie 

gation was strong: this year an 

n larger attendance of Massaehu- 

- "ts men is promised. At least a 

ial car will be needed to take the 
1 to the Hub from Amherst and 
• Header Birdsall has hopes of a 

- ial train. Tufts won the game 
year through Captain Adams' 

It drop kicking. Two field goals 

the sum total of his efforts. 

la, however could not get within 

ng distance of the goal line 

Aggie was held repeatedly 



when a touchdown seemed inevitable. 
Tufts has been doing great work 
this season ami Adams is playing 
his UBiial whirlwind gam*-. The 
•BON is sure to be close but this year 
the outlook is bright for a Massa- 
chusetts victory. Every man in col- 
lege who can lad the money is 
expected to leave on Saturday morn- 
ing's early train for Boston. 



WILLIAMS DRAMATICS AT 
NORTHAMPTON 

"Cap and Bells" the Williams col- 
lege dramatic club will open its sea- 
son, on Saturday Bight, Nov. I, in 
thr' Northampton Academy of Music, 
with a IfcMC act farce comedy "His 
Kxcellencv the C.nvernor" by U. 
Marshall. Rehearsals of the play 
hare been under way for thr' past 
several weeks under the direction of 
Frank Lea Short, Yale's dramatic 
<oa<h, who has been secured to coach 
Williams dramatics this year. Mr. 
Short is well known in dramatic cir- 
< les. having Starred with .John Drew 
and other Broadway celebrities. The 
club will journey to Northampton by 
special car, carrying its own sceu.i\ 
■I well as costumes. 

The play -His Exeellel-eV the 

Governor" was the first play that 

Kthel Barrymore St arr ed in with 
Robert Kdson at the Kmpire theater 
in New York. It is a p)av with a 
laugh from beginning to end. The 
cast of "His FsOSUesev" is a well 
balanced one. Charles Bracket) 'l.'< 
will pla\ the star p art <-f Stella and 
he certainh is I wonder as a woman 
actor. 

FRESHMEN LOSE 

The l'.tH' frx.tball team went down 
to defeat at Holyoke on Satmdav to 
the strong high school team of that 
place. The line-up I 

llol.VOKE. ,Q|6 - 

Brennan. Sullivan, le re, Bisbee 

Allen. It rt, Schauffler 

O'Neil, R. McCarthy. Ig rg; Ricker 

Kiley.c c. Harris 

Stimson, Ke nney, rg lg, Webster 

Hay. Mitchell, rt It. Whitney 

J. McCarthy, Walsh, re le, Rich, Blanpied 
Malone, qb qb, Hagar, Epstein 

Myers, J. McCarthy, Ihb rhb. Cate 

Moynahan, rhb lhb, Kldridge 

Mresnahan, fb fb, Palmer 

Touchdowns— Malone 2. Goals — Ma- 
lone. Goals from field— Malone 2. Ref- 
eree _ Norton. Umpire — Freeborn. 
Head linesman— Honey. Time— two 10 
and two 8-minute quarters. 

M. A. v. w. A. 

At the meeting of the M. A. C. C, 

A. on Thursday evening president 
Davies introduced Professor Waugh 
as the speaker for the evening. He 
talked to th<' men of the three founda- 
tions of life ; the good, the true, and 
the beautiful. Professor Waugh's 
talk should have reached more men. 
There are very few men in college 
that have not time to attend the 
Christian Association meetings ; this 
is proved by the presence of numbers 
of football men— the men who have 
the least spare time. 



PREP ABED 

PLANT FOODS 



Almost as much depends upon the proper use of fertilisers as upon 
their composition. We must remember that chemically prepared 
fertilizers are prtpa red pla nt foo.is . thai for best results they should be 
applied to a properly prepared seed bed or held. To feed highly con- 
centrated foods to an old, winded horse or a sickly cow exposed to the 
cold and wet, is usually money and labor thrown away; so it is money 
and labor poorly expended to buy com men ial manures and apply them 
to sour, wet, half baked land, or to land half plowtd and poorly piepared. 

Study (he Plan/ Food Problem 
— Then is something in it. — 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A. 




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Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 




CAMPION 

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Importation Lines 

Athlone Woolen Mills Ltd. 
Welch, Magetson's Ties, Caps, Hats 

Dent's Gloves 

Patrick's Mackinaws. Full Dress Suits a Specialty 









Tailor 



campion 

E. C. Edwards '14. M. A. C, Agent. 



Haberdasher 






The College Signal, Tuesday, October 29, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 29. '9'»- 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought '"'" an . d l *2RZ*%»i aH " 

and Fittings for Steam, Water ami OaJ. Ast 



Asbestos 

§ 5€m» tiss *te5n 

Connection*. HolyoKe, m«»». 



ik Teachers Exchange 

6)/ £*>*/«« •*> H-y!*'"" &' 



Orpervter & Morehouse, 

PRINTET 




No 1. Cook Place, 



Amherst. Mass. 




Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Vie«s, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Fnlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and .'..trails (or the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'fToLLEGE STUDIO 

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Every Farmer .hould study Fffklency and Economy In the use 
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tltles^MertllUer; but it Doe. Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount oTthe Right Kind of Fertiliser for Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER U, .».,, ,l..- M,p.,.emen«* 

of every crop Z every Kind of soil. Our experts (who are 

practical farmers) will be glad to assist you in making >our se'eciu,,, 

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the Ho.t Fxpert Cheml.U. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
tie Tuperiomy of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

„ ewa re of «Hose ferti.i.ers^ose ^~^^l bLwto 
J^ttS* « Ar hieing made 0/ cheap, infers 
materials. 

said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station: "The Value of a fertihier to he 
farmer depends ■at so macs upon what is paid for It as upon the 
character of the materials used to maKe it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty years use by the 
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insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

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THE C0E-M0RTIMER CO. 

51 CHAMBERS STREET NEW YORK CITY 



THE NORTHAMPTON PLAYERS 

Within one-half hour's ride from 
Amherst is the first and only munci- 
pallv-owned theatre and company of 
players in America. To a limited 
number of M. A. C. students who 
acted as "stipes" in the chorus of 
••Old Heidelberg" this is not news ; 
|q ■ majority of the men in college, 
however, the information should 
prove interesting that this unique 
distinction is held by the Academy 
of Music and the Northampton 
players. On its present basis the 
A.ademv opened for the first per- 
formance Monday, Oct. 7, but the 
plans had been developing for some 

time. 

-Each year it became more and 
more apparent that we are not getting 
the (lass of entertainments we 
wasted, and to which we felt enti- 
tled." said Frank Lyman, who has 
succeeded his father, the donor of 
tin- theatre, as president of the Hoard 
of Trustees. "The conditions from 
which we have suffered have affected 
all the smaller cities; they are the 
result Of a gradual change, a tend- 
:„„ v to colled all the theatres, plays, 
ami players at central points. 

••The original deed with which my 
father gave this theatre to the city 
stated that it should be used for lec- 
tures, concerts, operas, and dramas 
of the better sort. We have had 
lectures and concerts here, but little 
drama 'of the bette. sort.' We de- 
cided, finally, that the people of 
Northampton ought to have mote to 
sav alKJ.it th- Ml of their own thea- 
ter, ami after long th-liU-ration fur- 
ther decided that the only way In 
make this possible, was to provide a 
eiti/.ens' company of players to 
which they might dictate their wishes. 
We atari our new company under 
UUMlHioai which we regard as com- 
pelling, not from any vaulting ambi- 
tion on our part, of reforming the 
stage or elevating the drama, but 
simply from a desire to provide 
wholesome recreation at reasonable 

cost." 

The stock company is under the 
management of Bertram Harrison 
for 12 years manager and director of 
tl,e Frohmaii and Schubert interests, 
and Miss Jessie Bonstelle, known as 
one of the most successful stock 
( . ( , m panv managers in the United 
states. The company of players is 
headed D| Charles Balzar formerly 
of the New Theatre company and 
Miss Irene Oshier of the bos Ange- 
la stock company and includes a 
supporting caste of the highest type. 
The bill is changed weekly and it is 
pUnaad to use a variety of plays 
that will appeal to all. The open- 
ing production was "Old Heidelberg" 
ft romance, the student chorus of 
which was composed of Wilhston 
.eminarv and Aggie men. The sec- 
OBd week followed with "A Woman's 
Way" a clever comedy and the last 
week's offering was "The Deep Pur- 
ple" a successful melodrama. "Mary 
I Jones' Pa " is booked for this week 



All four of these are typical of then 
kind and are plays that have ha. 
highly successful runs. The perfor 
mances are given nightly with Wed 
nesday and Saturday matinees. 

And now the question naturalh 
arises as to just what is the purpose 
of an article (advertising in nature 
such as this in a college newspaper. 
The answer is three-fold. The North- 
ampton Players is not a money making 
scheme — it is a municipal institution 
that is doing work of the highest 
kind. Do M. A. C. men want it lo 
continue ? For three years the pres- 
ent seniors have heard the plaint 
"If there were only a theatre in 
Hamp that would give good plays I" 
The answer to that is at hand in thi- 
municipal theatre that is producing 
<,<>,„{ plays all the time and at a km 

price. 

Lastly the management of the North- 
ampton Players has unstintingly of- 
fered any amount of assistance to- 
ward making a successful season for 
the Roister Doisters and has freely 
given advice which will be of the 
utmost value. Instead of spending 
the evenings at low-grade vaudeville, 
it might l»e well to prove that the 
desire for high class theatricals is 
genuine by supporting to the best of 
our ability the Northampton players. 

IVf desertf it. 



( 



NEW YORK ALUMNI MEET 

[Continued from p*ga 3 J 



subjects that are in the public mint 
We are just as capable today of 
remaking the constitution as tl» 
Fathers. What the majority of MM 
Ameriean people want comes pretty 
0I0M to being right and we can IttVI 
radieal measures to their decision. 
We must sink 01 swim on our own 
initiative. If we as a people are 
unable to govern ourselves then Irl 
are as good as ruined and there i» 
little hope for us." 

Mr. Ellis a trustee of the col h 
spoke a few words alluding to tin 
attitude of the legislature. 

During the evening frequent soup. 
led by H. C. Hooker did much * 
enliven matters and keep the soup 
fresh in the minds of many alumni. 
At the conclusion the tellers, R. A. 
Cochran '82 of Kentucky and N. N- 
Jones *82 of Boston announced that 
the following directors had been 
elected for a term of five ysefSl 
Samuel C. Thompson '72, B. Take- 
rian'Ho, Arthur II. Sawyer *9$ au<l 
John A. Anderson 'OH. 
Those present were : 
George H. Ellis, Boston ; Samuel 
E. Armstrong, M. D., Rutherfoil. 
N. J. ; Horace Bowker, New York! 
Frederick W. Loughran, M. D., N«* 
York; Wayne M. Musgrave, NtS 
York; Charles A. Rausch ; Daniel 
Willard, Jr., Yale 1916. 

'71, Robert W. Lyman, Northamp- 
ton ; Wm. D. Russell, New York 
'72, Frederick A. Ober, Ha. 
sack, N.J.; Frederick W. Ho 
New York. 



'73, John B. Minor, New Britain, 
( oun. 

'74, Frank K. Adams, Brooklyn, 
\. Y. 

'75, Joseph F. Barrett, New York ; 
H. T. Babbitt, Chicopee. 

78, Saudford D. Foot, New York ; 
Charles E. Lyman, Middlelield, Coun. 

so, Alvan L. Fowler, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



THEKENNELCLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

Don't F'o«ra;e't 

That we are carrying a good line of 
— Tobnooo 



BIRDSALL '13 



FARRER 'IS 



THE NOBTHUPTON PLAYERS 

Academy of Music 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 28 



"MARY JANfS PA" 



-:- EVERY NIGHT -:- 

Price. 25c, 50c and 75c 

MATINEE WED. UNO SAT. 

Prices 2*c and Mc 



HtuiLiMiD 1 mm 

Stkpuen Lank Fomikh 

MANUrACTURtNO .1 i \\ i i i i« 
IHO IIKiiAllWAY, NKW YORK 

• 'l.l -II AND < •« U.I.I < . I 
PIN8 AND KINUH .* 

U< >!.!>. MIL.VRR AND HHOX/.K MKI/AI.M 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C R. ELDER 



•81, Henry E. Chapin, Sc. D., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Alfred D. Perry, 
Worcester. 

'82, Charles E. Beach, Hartford, 
Conn. ; Gregory Casparian, Floral 
Park, N. T.J Robert A. Cochran, 
Maysville, Ky. ; John A. Cutter, M. 
D , New York; Edward C. Luques, 
Biddeford, Me. ; Nathaniel N. Joins. 
Bostou; Daniel Willard, Raltimore, 
Md. ; James S. Williams, Glaston- 
bury, Conn. 

'85, B. Tekirinn, New York. 

*86. Winfield Ayres, M. 1)., New 
York ; William A. Eaton, New York. 

•91, Arthur II. Sawyer, Jersey 
City, N. J. 

'92, Alfred T, Beals, New York ; 
Francis G. Stockbridge, English- 
town, N.J. 

*94, Joseph H. Putnam, Litehfield, 

Conn. 

'95, Walter L. Morse, New York ; 
Henry W. Lewis. New York. 

'96, Frank L. Clapp, Cornwall-on- 
Hudson, N. Y. 

'97, George I). leavens, New York. 

*9«, Julian S. Katon, New York. 

'08, George L. Barrus. Lithia ; 
Stephen C. Bacon, New York. 

*04, Maurice A. Blake, New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. 

'05, William J. Coleman. 

'07, George II. Chapman, Am- 
herst; Frederick A. Cutter. Orange. 
N. J. ; James H. Walker, Newark, 
N.J. 

'08, John A. AnderHon, Montclair, 
N. J ; Albert J. Farley. New I'.runs- 
wick, N. J. 

'10, Myron W. Hnzeu, New York. 

'18, Fiederick D.Griggs; Miller 
Jordan; R. II. Van Zwaluwenburg ; 
George Zabriskie, 2ml. SjKH-ial stu- 
dent, Harold Willard. 

NOTICE 
There will be a meeting of all com- 
petitors for the editorial board of the 
College Sional Wednesday after- 
noon, Nov. 6, at one o'clock in the 
Sional office. 



RESOLUTIONS 



Whereas, It has pleased almighty God 
in His infinite wisdom to take unto 
Himself the mother of our beloved friend 
and classmate Thomas P. Dooley. 

Resolved, That we, the members of the 
Catholic club, do extend to him our 
sincerest sympathy in this, his hour of 
grief ; and be it lurther 

Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be inscribed upon the records of 
our club, that a copy be sent to him and 
that a copy be publised in the Coli.koe 
Sional. 

John L. Mayek, 
Albert J 
Thomas Ke 



Kenneijy, ) *- IUD - 



Whereas, It has pleased God in His 
infinite wisdom to take unto Himself the 
mother of our beloved friend and class- 
mate, Thomas H. Dooley ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That we, the members of 
the class of 1913, do extend to him our 
sincerest sympathy in this, his hour of 
grief ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lution, be sent to him, and a copy be 
published in the College Signal. 

John L. Mayer, I For the 
Wm. Stuart Moir, J Claw. 



FRESHMAN SOCCER TEAM 

Soccer football, which is coming 
more and more to be a reeognized 
college sport, is represented in 
"Aggie" by I team from the fresh- 
man class. This team played Satur- 
day the second game of the season 
and lost to the crack Wcstlield High 
school team, by the score of •_'-(>. CM 
Freshman laid. The game was 
snappy throughout. Busscll. San- 
derson, and Whitney starred for the 
"Aggie" cubs ; Tyler and McMahon 
for the visitors. 

Score-W. M S,a; M. A. C. '16, o. 
Goals— Tyler, Bodurtha. Penally kick 
— 1. Fouls — 6 Periods— 30 and 25-min- 
uje halves. Referee— Little, M. A. C. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

M. A. C. vs. Tuft* at Tufta oval. 
Medfor.l, Saturday. Nov. 2. Root- 
ers are coming dowu. 

'91. — E. Porter Felt, stjite entomol- 
ogist of New York, will have bis new 
quarters in the line new state edu- 
cation building at Albany, which has 
recently been dedicated. 

ft, Cotton A. Smith has now 
fully recovered from I loafl sickness, 
two months of which was spent in a 
hospital at Los Angeles, Cal. 

tH. Ilainhl K. BodftiM of 
Geneva, N. Y., spent a few days at 
Amherst, recently. 

'Of. —II. M. HusHcIl is the author 
of Bulletin MM just issued by the 
l". S. Hureau of entomology entitled 
"The Ite.-.n Thrips." This M page 
publication is upon a hitherto neg- 
lected insect which has recently 
licc.une 1 serious pest on the Pacific 
coast, where its depredations are 
troubling the truck farmers. This 
iaacct is closely related to the tobacco 
thrips ami onion thrips which cause 
untold losses yearly in the produc- 
tion of these staple products. The 
life history of the insect has already 
l.een worked out and experiment* 
are under way to develop an artificial 
control for the pest. The moat 
imj)ortant means of natural control 
seems to lie certain fungous diseases. 
A full description of these are given 
in this bulletin. 

'07. — Fxlward If. Shaw was mar- 
ried to Miss Maude I*. .Johnson, at 
Belmont ou Oct. 2nd. Shaw is en- 
gaged in market gardening at 
Belmont. 

'<>H. — William I'. Sawyer was mar- 
lied to Miss Grace K. Hixson, at 
Sharon, on Oct. 1 2th. 

♦09.— Harry (). Knight, Donald J. 
Caffery and Warren L. Me recently 
visited college together. 

11*— Ralph C. Robinson died 
Wednesday, Oct. 2:5, after a pro- 
longed illness with typhoid fever. 

'12. — A. N. Raymond spent last 
Wednesday at college. He is now 
engaged in reinforced concrete con- 
struction work at Westfleld. 

Ex-'15. — Clayton P. Hawes has 
entered the Massachusetts institute 
of technology. 



CRCtrlFICLI 



in 

MILtlti 




111 
I 

\ fl 

111 



MASSACHUSETTS NORTHERN STREET 
RAILWAY, 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 

if 



CAR A GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from ihe At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contract, a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



2j Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes sinned and Pollsfied 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
0|..-n s.m.lxv Main Ht. 

On way to I'oit Office. 






II. 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 29, 19 12. 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 



OEUEUS 

DRUG STORE 

Atnlierat, Maaa. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts, 
* ollats, 
Crib, - 
Flam wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10 15c 

2 I-2C 
2 I-2C 

48c per tioz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



Kai.i-ii J. Borukn. A «ent, 7 North Cottage 
Edward C. Edwards, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN A DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



rORTY=SI\TM YEAR 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Kill.- club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

stock bridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. D. Griggs, 1'iesident 

J. W. Covill, Manager 

L. Kdgar Smith, .Manager 

K. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little. Manager 

.' **^ C. Hokelund, Manager 

J. W. T. Lesure, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

.1. 1). French, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

L. (J. Davies, Presideut 

J. L. Mayer, Presideut 

W. S. Little. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON &> CUTLEX 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till ii o'clock EVERY night 
Carntr Amity and Pleasant Streets 



If you want to be 

><il in WITH TIIK OIKI M 
you must have your clothes presoeil ami cleaned 

ATEFSTEIN'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



Pressing sn.l Cleaning a sp.-clalty 

Mont liberal ticket system to town 
Tel. .10:1-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product, 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKKST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone $9-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, Sec. 

• Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 
Wi »l(gla1 <fe Dltaon 

Catalogues of 

Infill «V Winter Guoda 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. College 
Students and Athletes who want the reil, sapermr 
articles for the various sports should insist upon 
those bearing the Wright St Ditson i'rade Mark. 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'R-Shoes 

Sweaters 

Jerseys 

Uniforms 
for all sports 



Wright ■ Ditson Goods are the standard for 
all sports 

WMIOHT Jts OITslON 

344 Washington >t . Boston, Mass 



THE ePSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

Quickest Service, Heat Work, Lowest I'rl.i- 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' hue linen suits a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

Wfi. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 341-4 



CARS 



Leave AQOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. paat each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATE" 

The Republican gives the best report i 

Agricultural College and Amherst 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Daily ; $8. Sunday, $j. Weekly, U- 



THE COLLEGE 



fVRA 1* V of ill 

„\ 1 1 - - . 1 • • ■ t • 



(- 1912 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 5, 1912. 



No. 8 



RUSHING SEASON 



Brought to a Close. Over Seventy 
Pledge to Fraternities. 



CROSS COUNTRY VICTORY MUSICAL DIRECTOR 



Tufts Defeated in Dual Run by Score 
of 34 to ai. 



The rushing season closed Sunday 
evening and freshmen pltnifd yester- 
day morning. Those sTfco pltdftd t<> 
the various fraternities are as follow - 

(^ l\ V.— C K. ( hoate of Huston, 
H. W. (;raves of Shelburne Kails, 
K. L. King of Don-hester. IT. J, 
Mahoney of Winthrop, I>. Potter of 
( oiicord and W. R. Sears M.'i, of 
Arlington. 

l*lii Sigma Kappa— K. A. Ander- 
son of Somerville, R. L ( 'hisliolm of 
.Melrose Highlands, C. C. Kldridge 
of Natick, J. W. Murphy of Bev- 
erly, I*. A. Plaisted of Arlington. W. 
II. Pratt of Dalton, A.. I. Reed of 
Daltou, T. S. Rogers of Saxonville, 
F. .1. Seheufele of South Natick and 
II. (i. Verb., k of Maiden. 

< . S. ( -P. K. Bisbee of Waits- 
tield, Vt., R. Chamberlain of Ruther- 
ford. N. .1.. 1\ K. Doherty of Fall 
River. A. A. Gioiosa of Dorchester, 
N. L Harlow of Amherst; 1). A. 
Rieker of Worcester. L Schlotter- 
beck of Roxbury Station, ( 'onn., H. 
T. Whitney of Mt. Vernon, N. V. 
and T. P. Wileox of Andovei . 

Kappa Sigma— K. N. Dauforth of 
I .xcroft, Me..C. II. Fernald M Of 
Amherst, L. K. Fielding of Maid. n. 
B. Googins of Brooklyn. N. ^ . 
( . A. Huntington of Poqm.nock. 
2 Conn.; M. K. Md ullo. h or Paw- 
% tucket, K. L, T. M. Montgoinery- 
l'.ter of Fhiladelphia, Pa.. C/W. 
Moses of Ticondcroga. N. Y.G. It. 
I 'aimer of Itrookline, S. M. Prouty 
j f North Itrookfield. K. S. Richards 
^, f Northampton, K. S. Russell of 
adh-y and L W. Whitney of Brook- 



Tlie Massachusetts "Aggie" cross 
country team scon. I | decisive victory 
c\. 1 the Tufts cross country team 
just previous to the football game at 
Medford on Saturday, thus evening 
up the day's houoi Tim score was 



TUFTS WINS 13-0 



M to 91. Captain Atwater of Tufts 



lyn, N. I 

Kappa Gamma Phi— L. C. Heels- 
of Adams, A. T. Co.ircl.ne of North 
Adams. H. A. Curran of Marlboro, 
F. C. Keegan of Turners Falls, C. 
II. Lieber of .Jamaica Flain, A. K. 
Lindquist of Jamaica Flain, K. 
<Juincy of Roslindale, R. W. Rogers 
Of Roxbury and II. M. Walker of 
South Harwich. 

Ik-ta Kappa Fhi — W. II. Burt of 
l.ongmeadow, C. If. Guun of Sun- 
derland, W. L. Harris of Deerfield. 
K. B. Laird of Brockton, V. Nov. ■ 
1 Georgetown and F. C Forter of 
West Springfield. 

Theta Chi— W. G. Bradley of 
Groton, I). S. Dinsmore of Spring- 
field, II. II. Dunbar of Taunton. G. 
B. Fisher of Millbury. II. H. Tarbell 
of Warren, C. W. Wheeler of South- 
bOffO and R. K. Wheeler of Great 
Barrington. 

Sigma Fhi Kpsilon— N.U.Blanpied 
of Framingham, D. C. Brush of 



was the individual star, winning tin 
race. which was over a live mile course 
in l''.' minutes, IS seconds. (aptain 
Whitney of the "Aggies"' ran a pluck) 
race and finished in second place. 
The rest of the "Aggie" team fol- 
lowed in his wake. 

The team made an excellent show- 
ing. This is practically the first 
erase country team that has ever 
represented I he college and none of 
the men had had any great amount of 
experience. Captain Whitney who 
is really a ipiarter miler and not a 
distance man has come to the front 
in an amazingly short time. Rich- 
ards, the freshman captain also ran a 
putty race and came in third. 
Shirley and Hutchiligs took the next 
two place* and Baker clinched tin- 
race by coming in seventh. 

starting in front of t.oodard gym- 
nasium the men ran through Medford 
t.. Middlesex Folfta, returning by way 
of Medford square and College avenue 
to Tufts athletic field. mImic the\ 
finished with one lap around the 
track, (apt. Atwater broke the tape 
during the first ipiarter of th. 
fo..t!.al! game and received an ova- 
tion. The 10 runners finished in the 
following order: Atwater, Tufts; 
Whitney. Massachusetts agricultural 
college; Richard-. Massachu-. -tt- 
agriciiltural college : Shirley. Mas- 
m 1ms. 'tis agricultural college : 
Hutchings,Massa<hii-.1t- agiicultural 
college; Swan, Tufts: Baker, Massa- 
chusetts agricultural college; Kat/.. 
Tufts; Fox. Tufts; Frescott, Tuft>. 



Mr. John Bland of New York Engaued 
for Coming Season. 

The musical association has been 
exceedingly fortunate in securing M 
director for the i-oming IOsVOOO, 
.lohn Bland of New York city. Mr. 
Bland as a musical director and voice 
developer has t, w cjuals ami will ill 
all probability turn out a glee club 
which will be equalled BJ few. 

John Bland began his can 
OrgOJsJoJ and choiiinaster of St 
Johns church. Carlisle. Fa ., at the 
Of eighteen. haMlig studied har- 
inonv and OTgOB for a number of 
rain with Winston Fine of St 
Mark-. Fhiladelphia. While at (a. 
lisle Mr. Ulaild was made musical 
director of Dickinson college, a post 
he held for five \eais. Mr. Bland 
then went to New York to stud\ 
voice under Victor Beigel. | disting- 
uished Austrian \oi.e specialist. 
After a sear's study he was ap- 
pphrtod tenor soloist of All An-. I- 
church. smcee.lillg F.xan Williams. 
tin- great Welsh tenor. After some 
time of stmlv ill Munich and l/mdoii 
Mr Bland was heard ill man\ con 
..its and recitals al.road and in 
Aim In F'Ofi 1 - "iade 

lultlbt Of Calvary chunh. N. w \ oik. 
sin. ceding to the choirmasteiship 
M-veral years later. The choir .-f 
Calviuv chinch is generally consid- 
, 1. d tin- finest boy choir in the coun- 
tiy. Mr. Bland d. votes his entire 
time to concert si„^ M i-_'. v.. me devel- 
oping and the training of his tine 
choir. 



SCHUBERT QUARTET COMING 

Frof. Edgar Ashley announces n 
concert to be given in the chapel next 
week Wednesday evening Nov. IS, 
by the Sch11b.1t string quartet of 
Boston. The work of this musical 
organization is of exceptional merit 
and has been heard this fall at man\ 
of the colleges. If ftM students will 
attend, students' tickets will be fur- 
nished at •_'•"» cents. Othei tickets 
will be fifty cents. This concert 
oftel Hm student body opportunity 
to hear a quartet which is in gnat 
demand because of its unusual 
talents. 



LOUIS BRANDEIS' DEFINITION 
OF A PROFESSION. 

>-The pei uliar chai a.tei isii.s of a 
profession as distinguished fi«»m 
other occupations. I take to be these : 

"First : A profession is an occu- 
pation for which the neceosary OfO- 
limin.u> training is intellectual in 
chanuter. involving knowledge and 
to some .xtent learning as disting- 
uished from mere skill. 

"Second : It is an occupation 
which is pursued largely for others 
and not merely for one's self. 

"Third: It is an occupation in 
which the amount in financial return 
is not the accepted measure of stic- 
s." 



[Cantinued on page 3 J 



'ji_ Krwin I>. Winn spent a few 

days in town recently. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Rev. Clarence F. Swift, pastor of 
the Central Congregiitional church of 
Fall River, was the speaker at the 
first Sunday chapel of the year. 
Owing to the late return of the men 
who took the Tufts trip, the attend- 
ance was below normal. 



Team Flays a Hard Oame. Tufta 
Strong on Forward Passes. 

'The annual football game between 
Massachusetts •• Aggie" and Tllfts 
|i laved Saturday afternoon 
at Me. Ifoid. resulting in a IS to 
victory for the Tufts eleven. The 
game was hard fought throughout and 
while 'Tufts had a little the better of 
the argument in the kicking depart- 
ment, the teams were otherwise very 
eveiils matched. 'The Medford men 
presented a slightly heavier line-up 
than Massachusetts ami a team that 
had speed as well as weight. 'The 
j ii •" showed plenty of fight but 
if there was an\ such thing as luck 
in the game. Dame loitune kiiw fit to 
liestow it most generously at home. 

It was a big game. Tufts has 
done some excellent woik thus far 
this season and has inn up some large 
s on manv good teams. The 
••Aggies'* showed even more improve- 
incut than they did against Holy 
, lh. week before. It Was S 
game that will go down into Utatorv 
because so many undergraduates) ami 
alumni were present to see it. 

Uv.i .00 undergraduates accom- 
panied tin* team to Medford. More 
than -'•><» of tin • went down on a 
special train having Amherst shortly 
sitor 10 o'clock. The students dis- 
eiubarkcdat Davissquai . .Som.rville, 
foi dinner and then, headed by the 
...liege band, marched four abreast 
to the field I stand was al- 

aU of -Aggie" sup|M,rters 
and alumni and the sidelines WOTO 
lined with automobiles. Cheer-leader 
Birdsall brought his men togeth. 1 
along the lines in front of the stands 
there was never a minute when the 
students were not cheering the team 

along. 

I he game was .all.d promptly at 
I o'clock. The "Aggies" had won 
III,. to-.s ami chose to receive the 
kick, defending the north goal. Gore 
took the ball on the kick-off ami the 
bucks began hitting the Tufts line for 
good gains and two first downs. 
Then s : ,msoi, in-lrd off a 20-yard 
run on I delayed pass but the ball 
was brought back and the team pen- 
alized for off-side play. Tufts held 
,|. -p. lately and Smith was forced to 
,„iut. Right here the "Aggies" w 
at a decided disadvantage. The 
Tofts line broke through repeatedly 
and it was all Smith could do to get 
his kicks off in time. Most of them 
went high and Adams was always 
readv to i.c.ive them. On the other 
hand, the Tufts captain sent his 
long and low and the "Aggie" backs 
had trouble in running them back. 
In the first period the play was 



)¥ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 191 2. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 191a- 






f'.ist Mini furious with neither side 
having imv decided advantage, Tufts 
fumbled rep eat e dl y hut recov e red 

most of the tium. Both teams tried 
the forward pass with varying suc- 
cess. Near the close of the half 
Angell sent a long pass to Donnellan 
that cleared the secondary de- 
fense Of tfct "Aggies" and brought 
the ball to the ten yard line. The 
team held like a stone wall and 
Adams dropped hack on an attempt 
at goal. Ht> fumbled the high pass, 
boW O TCr, and Qorc recovered the ball 
just as time was called for the first 

period. 

Tufts scored the first touchdown, 
in the second period after the 
''Aggies" had held them within lo 
yards of the line. Smith's punt was 
blocked ami Hichardson recovered the 
ball within ."» yards of the goal. On 
the next rush Maker was sent out of 
the game for rough play and before 
the team could pull together Angell 
had carried the ball over for the 
score. Wilson, however, failed to 
kick the goal so Massachusetts stock 
still remained high. 

The second half opened with Sam- 
son kicking off for M. A. C. Both 
teams were fighting hard and the hall 
changed hands very often. On each 
punt, lumcver, Tufts gained fully 
l. r » yards ;uxl soon the ball was again 
near the Massachusetts goal. The 
Aggies held and Adams attempted a 
drop, lie got the kick off well but 
the ball went wide, it was brought 
out nnd put in play again on the 20 
yard line hut soon it was back again 
as the residt of several long forward 
passes. 

Once more M. A. ('. held and once 
inoie Adams dropped back for a 
kick. Cumin blocked it and the 
ball bounded away down the field 
with the Aggie man after it. A 
touchdown seemed sure but as Cur- 
ran picked up the ball he slipped and 
fell and before he could get started 
the Tufts team was upon him. 
Despite this ill luck the team came 
back strong and made four first 
downs in a row, bringing the ball to 
mid Held where the quarter ended. 

In the last period Tufts started 
things oft* in whirlwind style. By a 
series of shift plays the hall was 
taken to the Aggies' '20 yard line 
where the team held. Smith broke 
a shoestring and while he was getting 
another Meliean walked over to the 
side line. On the next play Gore 
made a perfect forward pass to Mel- 
iean who had a clear field ahead of 
him. It was already getting dark, 
however, and the little end dropped 
the ball. Smith punted to Adams in 
mid-field and Tufts carried the ball 
over in six lightning-like plays. The 
loss of Brewer, Baker and Edgerton 
had weakened the Massachusetts team 
perceptibly. This time Wilson 
kicked the goal. 

Samson kicked off again but Aggie 
got the ball soon after when Angell 
passed off-side. It was so dark that 
Gore decided to take a chance on for- 



ward passes. He called for eight in 
a row and while most of them were 
incomplete, the ball was carried 
slowly but surely toward the Tufts 
goal line. Time was called soon 
after with the ball in the Aggies' 
possession on Tufts 20 yard line. 

Both teams showed evidences of 
thorough drilling from the coaches. 
There was plenty of team play on 
both sides. The old style regular 
formation was seldom if ever used. 
Tufts had an inexhaustible store of 
different shifts and formations. The 
center faced the backs instead of his 
opponent and passed the ball with 
excellent aim in any direction he 
wished. 

Gore proved himself to be the old 
reliable defensive quarterback that 
he has always been. In Saturday's 
game six different times the "Kid" 
was the only obstacle between the 
Tufts man who was carrying the hall 
and the goal line but each time Gore 
brought down his man with a clean, 
hard tackle. 

Massachusetts was handicapped in 
the backfield by minor injuries. 
Brewer was suffering even before the 
game with his foot that he injured in 
baseball last spring. Graves was 
badly battered a!>out the face aud 
was troubled with a weak ankle. 
The line plaved strongly for the most 
part of the game and although out- 
weighed succeeded in opening up 
holes for the backs to plow through 
for good gains. 

Tufts had two stars in Captain 
Adams and Angell. The former did 
><>me excellent punting and his run- 
ning back of kicks was brilliant, 
Many times he threw off five and six 
Aggie tacklers before being brought 
down. Angell did some fine work in 
ea rrying the hall and was especially 
strong in forward passes. 

The line-up 1 
TUKTS. m. a. c. 

Kllms, Mclver, le re, Meliean 

O'Donnell, Thorndyke, It 

rt, Maker, Curran 
Houston, Ig rg, Griffin 

Richardson, Kobbins, c c, Cole 

Tobin, Mabcock, rg Ig, Eisenhaure 

Mennett, rt It, Samson 

Donnellan, re le, Edgerton, O'Mrien 

Wilson, Garvin, qb qb, Gore 

Hadley, Mitchell, Ihb rhb, Smith 

Angell, Hadley rhb Ihb, Brewer, Nissen 
Adams, Mitchell, fh fb, Graves 

Score— Tufts 13, M. A. C. o. Touch- 
downs— Angell, Mitchell. Goal from 



touchdown— Wilson. 


Umpire — G. 


M. 


Mankart, Dartmouth. 


Referee — G. 


L. 


Mragg, Wesleyan. 


Linesman — A. 


M. 


Farmer, Dartmouth. 


Time — Four 


•5- 


minute periods. 







CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The meeting scheduled for last 
Thursday evening was cheerfully 
given up to football enthusiasts. 
President Davies will have charge of 
the meeting next Thursday evening, 
and football supporters and player* 
will doubtless, in turn, attend the meet- 
ing. The football players are de- 
pendable, and again it is up to the 
student bod v. 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
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Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 
$5.00 and $6.00 



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EXPERT REPAIRING 



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THE 



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Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
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SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badge*. Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seels, 

Rings, Charms.*. .\ 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Kciivolllililt. M(lt«»a* 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 
Offset Hours: 

BtOlBA.M. I.IU»tn«P.M. 



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House Next to Laundry. 



Fall t Winter Suits I Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order A Ready to Wear Suits 

Latest Styles 
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M H WHITE 'IS. Agent 
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Big Bottle of White Pine and Tar 

For 2&&C. 

OUR White Pine and Tar is a valuable remedy in chronic or recent 
pulmonary affections of the throat or lungs — relieving obstinate coughs by 
promoting expectorations — and serving as a calmative in bronchial or 
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ADAMS' 

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An Anodyne Expectorant Cough Syrup without Water. 
A H*ixxcl>- Box Paokase SIRo. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

T*a«3 RI$XAJLrXr Store On tHe Corner 



FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

The game Saturday was a bad oue 
for Mi A. C supporters l<» watch. 
The team put up a great fight but 
nearly all the important breaks of 
luck 'favored Tufts. Directly after 
Baker's removal from the game, with 
the team not yet settled down, Tufts 
l.roke through the line, blocked the 
puut and recovered the ball on our 3- 
vard line, Another play put the ball 
,.ver the goal line. Again, when 
Curran broke through :tnd blocked 
I >pt. Adams' attempt at a field goal 
things broke badly for Aggie. Cur- 
11 was hard after the ball with a 
clear field ahead of him. The play 

M.ked jiood for a touchdown but in 

.veringthe pigskin Curran slipped 

did fell, being downed in the middle 

of the field. These explanations are 

not intended in the nature of excuses. 

The team does nol need excuses for 
j. laved a great game, holding the 
heavy Tufts backs time after time aa 
they tried to plunge through the line. 
The team has improved wonderfully 

luring the past month and the next 

uo games look like victories for M. 

\. ('. Last year New Hampshire's 
colon were lowered «-0 and this year 

•m even more decisive victory may l>e 

looked for. 



men are needed. It is planned to 
leave Amherst Saturday morning, 
travelling to Manchester by way of 
Oakdale. Saturday night those in 
the Pullman will make the car their 
headquarters as the hotels in town 
will in all probability be crowded to 
their full capacity. An attempt is being 
made to arrange a joiut concert of 
the musical clubs of the two colleges 
in Manchester for Saturday night. 
If this falls through the 27 who take 
the trip may go to Boston instead if 
they choose, for some theatrical per- 
formance Saturday night. Return- 
ing to the car that night. Sunday 
morning will find them in Amherst 
once more. The coat of the trip, as 
planned, is very moderate and already 
aUnit II have planned to go. See 
W. J. Birdsall at once in regard to 
making the trip. He 0M promise 
you a "live" time. This game is 
New Hampshire's big game and 
plenty of excitement will prevail in 
Manchester. 



SWEATERS 

and 

MACKINAWS 



RUSHING SEASON 

[Continued from page i] 



Efforts are l>eing made to get 

enough men to go to New Hampshire 

so that an entire l*ullman car may 

bartered. For this purpose -'7 



Vinevard Haven, R. M. (ate of Can- 
ton. \V. S. OofttJ Of Wilton, Conn., 
R. A. dishing of Somerville, C K. 
Hathawav of Somerset, II. G. Mat- 
toon of Pittsfield. J. T. Nicholson of 
Leominster and H. Taylor of Florida. 
N. Y. 

Lambda Chi Alpha— A. S. 00ss> 
man of Mendon. C. W. Curtin of 
Aubuindale, M. C. I.ane'l'. of South 
Hiixbui ■ « I . (Joodwin of Haver- 
hill and* R. Stoughton of Montague. 




In their famous es- 
says,Ciceroand Emer- 
son both omitted to 
say that many life-long 
friendships have had 
their beginning in the 
College pipe. 





TOBACCO 

is the kind that fosters 
friendship and glori- 
fies good fellowship. 
This delightful to- 
bacco has a taste that 
tickles the tongue of 
fault finders into 
words of praise— and 
brings to the mouths 
of scoffers the smile 
of satisfaction. 



fy&v^te-**** 







The Fall season is the Sweater time of th<* year. The Football 
games call for Mackinaws and Sweater*. We ant showing the 
best styles of the best makers. No fancy prk d in tin* store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



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lt» 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 1911. 









T HE CO LLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

R. H.VANZWAi.KNIll'Kil'n.Kditor in-Chief 
CHESTER B.WHEELER 'u.ManattiiiifKtiitor 
OSCAR O. ANDERSON *i% AaaiataM l-dit.-i 
PREDERICE D.ORIGGS'13, Athletic Kditor 
S. MILI.F.K JORDAN '13. Athletic Kdit.ir 

HAKKV W. ALLEN *i.1. Altimni'K.lilor 

STUART H. POSTER 'U. Department Kditor 
F.RVINE F. PAKKFR'u, Alumni Kditor 

HAROLD C. BLACK *u, Campus Editor 

J. ALBEKT PRICE "i?. Associate Kditor 

GEORGE B. DON Ml I. 'is. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DFPARTMENT 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE ad. '13. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CIARK.IR.'M.Asst.Hus.ManaKer 
ERNEST F. irioN'w. Asst.Adv Manager 
MAl'RICE J. CI 01 '.II i>. Circulation 



Subscription $1 50 per vear. Slnrle 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd 



EiiW md m itamd-r'x" matter at the Amherst 

OfSaa. 



known to the entire student body. 
Thi' College senate might be granted 
some hat with a special band by 
which its members may be known to 
everyone about campus. This mat- 
ter should not be dropped by the 
senate beCBBSe it affects that organ- 
ization alone and so directly. It is 
a matter which should be brought 

before the student bodj, and ;*t once 



Vol. XXIII. TfisDAv. Oct. SB. No. 7 



I'koi 1 Mon A-111 1 > has seenred the 

Schubert quartet for the first of a 
series of ssasJesl evenings for the 
coining year. Those men now hi 
college who were enabled through 
the energy of Professor Ashley to 
enjoy last year's concerts will, doubt- 
less, need little ailviee as to the atti- 
tude to be taken toward this season's 
course. A word to the new men, 
however, is not out of place. Broad 
as is the curriculum at M. A. ('., the 
preponderance of scientific studies 
inevitably makes for a certjiin nar- 
rowness and lack of attention to the 
cultural phases of life. Opportun- 
ities to enjoy the work of u high 
grade musical organization such as 
the Schubert quartet are none too 
numerous here. Let efSYJI freshman 
show his personal appreciation by 
supporting the concert with his 
presence. 



Tanas is a fly in the ointment. 
It was a great exhibition of spirit 
when half the College traveled to a 
hostile gridiron to stand bv the team 
and to spur it on to do its utmost. 
The team's hackers were there to 
cheer and cheer they did. But does 
anyone who was present honestly 
think that the cheering was up to 
standard ; that it was the best that 
the students are capable of I It is • 
doubtful. No one in particular was , 
to blame, but every one was just a 
little at fault. When cheering piac- 
tise has been attempted on the side- 
lines heie. on the campus or at mass 
meetings how often has the full 
"squad" turned out r A week from 
Saturdav the team is Spins to beat 
•Spt ingtield. OTeTS week is ahead 
of us. If by the H'.th the cheering } 
section is not working together it will, 
be time to think that i heeling || a 
losl art at If. A. C. 



Wednesday was rally day on the 
campus for a certainty. At one 
o'clock the Roosevelt and Wilson 
tactions formed processions and 
headed by bands proceeded about the 
campus until assembly when they 
adjourned to the chapel to listen to 
tin- eloquence of the three campaign 
orators. 

At assembly last Wednesday 
Kverett A. Cooper, manager of track 
presented the victorious freshman 
-s country team with a team cup. 
anil the captain of the team 
in turn presented it in behalf 
of the team to the student body, 
represented by H. W. Kllis who has 
charge of the trophy room. 



SOCIAL UNION SATURDAY. 

Saturday evening there will be a 
social union entertainment in the 
chapel. Mr. I\. R. Welbourn will give 
a lecture on populai science, illustra- 
ting his talk with experiments. 



10. Henry L. Russell visited 
friends in Amherst last week, lie is 
engaged in the ice business in 
Rawtucket, R. I. 



Notiiini. detracts from the appear- 
ance of public grounds quite so much 
as a littering of snap-papers and 
general refuse. However conscien- 
tiously the grounds dep"rtmcnt may 
work in caring for the campus 
all its labors are to little effect unless 
the student IkmIv does its share. 
This is a small matter upon which 
it seems neeess:u\ to speak every 
year; a little thought upon the part 
of the students will do a great deal 
toward reminding visitors that we 
have here a campus that ranks among 
the most beautiful in New Kngland. 



Thkrf. are main students who go 
through an entire year or more with- 
out learning by sight the members of 
the college senate, the student gov- 
erning body. Membership to this 
bodv is, and should be, considered as 
the highest honor which a class QBE 
bestow upon any of its members. 
Senators are presumably the leaders 
in their classes and are chosen for 
their ability as well as for their pop- 
ularity. It seems only a matter of 
course that such men should be 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

I N«i<ice* for tin-, coliimn should lie dropped in 
the.-l.vw ntiir...ir h.mdeil to M.irol.l ( Mack 
'14. on or U-foie Saturday preceedingeach issue] 

Nov. 7, |»45 i-. m.— M. A. ( . 

Christian Association in 
(Impel. 
Nov. '.» — Football. New Hampshire 
at Manchester, N. II. 
Kl p. M. — Social Inion 
Kntcrtainmcnt in hi ill 
Hall. Mr Reno R. Wel- 

bonro. 

lo. :t-l.') a. M. Sunday chapel. 
Bishop TnOSBBS V. Davics 
of Springfield. 
It, 7-0<> r. m. — Stockhridge 
Club. Room (i South 
colic-. 
Nov. l.'l, 1-30 p. M. Assembly l>r. 
Robert .1. Spragne M. A. 

c. 




OK 

Pheasant 

a in it v? St.. 
Bmbcnjt 

I i-l« phone 470 



MRIAKfAST 
I.UNCHaON 
AKTIHNOON TEA 

I 'inner if arranged for. 



Nov 



Nov 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at ij Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



CAMPUS NOTES 
V i si tor s on the campus the past 
week would certainly have gone away 
with a good impression of the enthus- 
iasm at '"Aggie. 

The College BsQEAl, having out- 
grown its old otlice has moved its 
headquarters into the senate room 
where ample space will be afforded 
for the work of the publication. Tie 
Roister Doisters are occupying the old 
S10N \i. ollice. 

Professor Neal has an article in 

the ir« i*f< '/■/). \i //• England lor < tetober 

entitled "For Common Weal Through 
Agriculture" which gives a very good 
idea of the work that is being done 
by the college and gives some very 
Ins illustrations of the campus. 




Academy 
of Music. 



WEEK OF NOVEMBER 



"A MAN'S WORLD" 

BY RACHEL CROTHCRS 

-:- EVERY NIGHT -:- 

Prices 25c. 50c and 75c 

MATINEE WED. AND SAT. 

Prices 25c and 50c 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— or — 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Roston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEFT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 



I. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY TONIC 



Eld ridge '14 



Kendall '16 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



THE COLLEGE PLAN OF CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT 



itv has nlwavs made it seem most 
appropriate as a site for college 
Imildings and as an environment for 
.(•liege life. Many generations of 
paduates now testify to the inspiring 
influences of these surrounding!-.. 
Amherst in fart enjoys more than a 
Iocs) reputation for the beauty of its 
1. rv, being widely aeeepted as a 
of what is best in the rolling 
f, 1 tile landscape of >cw England. 
The value of this environment and 
the impoitance of its wise develop- 
ment was recognized at the outset, 
tad the late l'"u deiick Law Olmsted, 
the most eminent landscape gardener 
of his day, wan brought to Amherst 
,„ |Mf to idhrltn "pon the location 
of buildings ami the planning of the 
I .iiipus. Afterward under the leader- 
ship of such men a> Marshall V. 
Wilder, Colonel Clark, Professor S. 
T. Mayuard and trustee .lames Dra- 
BSfl miieh was done to beautify the 
npiis, especially by the planting of 
trees and shrub* and the opening of 
luge lawns. From the Btart the 
inds took on an air of breadth 
. openness which is still their chief 
thai ... 1. listic and charm. When one 
compares the wide campus of M. A. 
I with the cramped and crowded 
grounds of many othci colleges the 
incontestable value of the former i- 
greatly emphasized. 

\\ hen tin- ( ollege. a few years ago, 
entered on its period of great ex- 
pansion, it was seen that a restudy of 
the situation was imperative to pro- 
rldl for the praps* location and hai- 
raonioufl arrangement of new build- 
ings, to provide also for the rapidly 
wing college jiopulation and for 
their enormously multiplying activi- 
s. and to provide most of all for 
the conservation of the beauty of the 
inds in all their charm and in- 
BBBBBS. A commission was author- 
ized by the trustees which took the 
mutter in charge, and which has now 
for several vears directed the forma- 
tion of new plans to meet the new 
litions. Various studies, some 
ial and some comprehensive, 
I made by Professor F. A. Wangh 

■ •f the department of landscape. 
*• • ral architects and engineers 

■ consulted. Finally Mr. Warren 
II Manning of Boston was retained 

be trustees, and has now been 

.ged for a period of more than 

years in the preparation of plans 

an i in the practical development of 

iled improvements upon the 

. hds. In this work he has en- 

'1 the constant cooperation of the 

missions* on grounds and of the 

_ f . department of landscape. 



Mr. Manning's Ideas to be Worked Out with the Purpose of 
Preserving Expanse of View on the College Estate. 

The practical advantages and the | The choice of Mr. Manning for 
natural beauty of the site occupied bv ibis wink has been peculiarly happy 
the College have been recognized by in many ways. For one thing he was 
1 voiie from the first foundation of ' foi some years assticiatcd with the 
the institution in Amherst. The late Frederick Olmsted, already men- 
tioned as the first landscape gardener 
of the grounds. Moreover, Mr Man- 
ning is everywhere acknowledged to 
be artistica'ly one of the best repre- 
sentatives now living of the Olmsted 
style of landscape gardening — a style 
which may easily be accepted as the 
one best adapted to the character of 
the ( ollege estate. Kuthei more, Mr. 
Manning has already been engaged 
as principal designei or advisory 
counsel in the planning of a large 
number of college grounds in all 
parts of the country. 

Heceiitly, Mr. Manning has sub- 
mitted t<» the trustees I general plan 
for the College estate which has 
been adopted as the working plan of 
the College. Mr. Manning BBSalflO 
been retained as landscape designer 
and advisor, working in connection 
with the College landscape depart- 
ment, to carry the new plans forward. 
The first feature of the new plan is 
it> provision for an orderly grouping 
of theCollege buildings, — a mattci of 
the most fundamental importance, 
and vet one neglected in many pub- 
lic institution^. The buildings 1 
l.\ the various agricultural depart- 
ments will be placed in a group 011 
the west side of the campus, those 
SjBBd bv the horticultural departments 
will supply the proper antiphony on 
the east side of the campus; build- 
ings like dormitories and dining hall, 
devoted to the domestic ami social 
life of the students will lie grouped 
at the southwest side of the campus. 
and tin other buildings are similarly 
classified and grouped. 

The plans provide for keeping the 
central |>ortioii of the campus per- 
manently open. The [xuid is to M 
preserved and eventually extended. 
Most of the present trees are to be 
kept, with only so much pruning and 
cutting as may lie necessary to the 
health of the trees and the opening 
of attractive vistas. Other plant- 
ings will be made in support of the 
present groupings. Some new ser- 
vice roads are projected and a l»elt of 
pleasure boulevard is suggested 
against the possible needs of a re- 
mote future. It has been the policy 
in making this plan to forsce and 
provide for all the possible growth of 
the College in the next fifty years. 

The new plan is already in opera- 
tion, that is, all current improve- 
ments are being carried out in accor- 
dance with it. The most important 
of these thus far have been the lo- 
cation of the new entomology, live 
stock and dairy buildings and the 
construction of new walks. Other 
equally important improvements are 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 

Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, containing the right amounts of 
available nitrogen, in both chemical and organic forms, with IB excess 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric acid, both for fertilizing and CBtstys- 
ing effects, and the proper amount and light form of potaj.li, all thor 
oughly blended together and in forms that will not cake, but remain in 
a drillable condition, and which will SCI m.t only in the beginning, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the needs of the crop and 
market requirements), are what the practical fanner should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops. Ahove all things, he should avoid unbal- 
anced and improper mixtures that have the defect of one dtment being 
insoluble and another element ft* soluble for success/al plant growth. 



Study l he P/anl I'ood Problem 
— There is something ui it. — 



B0WKER : 



ERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A. SHERARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



Kiippenheimcr's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 







That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a A. K. 

CAMPION, Sole Atfent 






OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 

VVe make them all and make them right at 



I 
1 I 






3VL 

Collt'm' Store 





1 1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 19 12. 



The Hotyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



^Teachers Exchange 



Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Hiass Pipr, Valves 
and Fittings for Steam, Water ami ('•»%. \sbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and I'ipe Coverings, I'i |.x* 

JSUSSXf iSJiSS^ JStf flSiSS ° /B "" " »***-*. 

.\ , : I t ;r,::. c ns pr,nklerSyiten,s ' ■ttKSEL.t RecommenCs Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



Carptrvtcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No 1, Cook Place, Amherst. Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt md cartful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and l\,i trails for the very 
best work. 



fully planued in detail and await only 
the necessary appropriation! by the 

legislature. 

Fortunately Mr. Manning's servi- 
ces have not beeu confined to one 
plan, with the expectation that his 
activities shall end there. It is un- 
derstood that he is to become a per- 
manent member of the College staff, 
acting as professional advisor to the 
trustees in the further development of 
the College estate, and cooperating 
also with the other members of the 
landscape gardening department lroth 
in working out the necessary detail 
plans of the grounds ami in develop- 
ing the highest possible standard of 
professional instruction for the stu- 
dents in that department. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash BlocK. Amherst 

II. M Kiw.kks. '15, Agent. 



87 Pleasant St., 



Stud") Phone 303-2. 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 



1 f+n T- 



QUALITY 



I Standard of Excellence for over 50 Years l 1 % » I t» 

THAT MEANS ECONOMY 



Every Farmer should study Ffficiency and Economy in the use 
of fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer; but it Does Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount of the Right Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER 10 mm* ibc ra q u iw a mu 

of every Crop on every kind Of SOil. Our experts (who are 

practical farmers) will be glad to SSSiSf you in making )our selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Values than are 
the Host Expert Chemist*. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

Beware of those fertilizers whose only commendation is a "cut' in price. 
This is an admission of one of Iwo things — either ihey have been too 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials. 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station : — " The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends set so much upon what is paid for it, as upon the 
character of the materials used to make it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty wars' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

insist u,.on getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be "just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will he 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 

51 CHAMBERS STREET NEW YORK CITY 



THE PRESIDENT ON CRIBBING 

It should l>e understood by the 
student that "cribbing*' is ahva\s 
nothing more nor less than cheating, 
tad that any attempt to gain OF give 
aid from a lx>ok, or I student. Of I 
paper, comes within the definition. 

The fact that a student does not 
profit by an attempt to cheat does 
not absolve him from the wrong 
doing. 

The rule against cheating applies 
equally to recitations, quizzes, tests, 
and examinations. 

Instructors have no option but to 
re|H>rt proved cases of cheating to 
the president of the college. 

The president reserves the right to 
decide on the particular punishment 
to l»e meted out. It will ordinarily 
involve suspension or expulsion from 
the college. 

Krs>.-\ I.. BrrrKKHKi.n. 



a highly finished villain, unscrupulous 
and mercenary. H. D. Brown deserves 
especial mention. F. W. Read seems 
particularly adapted to the part of 
the vivacious humorless French pro- 
fessor, while the high tenor voice and 
charming feminine attributes of A. L. 
Hulsizer would not be out of place in 
the most aristocratic household 
domestic. M. I). Campbell and A. 
K. Wilkins are alternating between 
the characters of Nancy, the preco- 
cious daughter of the vill and Martha 
Rennick wife of the supposed infant 
prodigy. 



CAST AT WORK ON NEW PLAY 

Final assignment of the parts for 
"The New Boy" has been made and 
rehearsals are being conducted regu- 
larly on Tuesday. Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings. A coach has not yet 
been secured but it is expected that 
last season's coach Mrs. James K. 
Mills will return >h«»rtl\ to take com- 
mand of the situation. The play 
selected in place of "Bachelors 
Honeymoon" is a clever three act 
comedy by the London playright 
Arthur Law, entitled "The New 
Boy." The plot is rather unique 
hinging on situations encountered by 
Archibald Rennick aged 10, whose 
juvenile appearance causes him to be 
mistaken for 11. 

The cast chosen is practically the 
same as that picked for "Bachelors 

; Honeymoon." The title role la car- 
ried by S, M. Jordan who last year 

: portrayed the character of | willowy 
young debutante. Jordan has had 
considerable experience on the stage, 
having appeared at various times in 
such plays as "The Private Secre- 
tary" "The Mikado," ami the M. A. 

! C. minstrels. Zabriskie of "Private 
Secretary" fame portrays the prover- 
bial boarding school bully. \V. S 
Moir is particularly well fitted for the 
part of the dignified head master with 

a touch of nonsensical romance. As 



ASSEMBLY 

Wednesday's assembly marked the 
climax of the presidential campaign 
on the campus. Shortly after dinner 
the Wilson club set the ball rolling 
by holding a parade about tin foot- 
ball field. Headed by the orthodox 
transparencies and a drum corps the 
parade made its may aliout the cam- 
pus gaining in strength. In a short 
while the bull inoosers were under full 
sail with a bandanna flying at their 
prow. Twenty Taft men and three 
freshmen maintained a dignified 
silence under the elms in front of 
South. 

The assembly hour was given ov«i 
to politics and members from each of 
the three leading political clubs 
addressed the convention. Mob I 
8|M»ke for the Wilson club. Jordan I 
for the cohorts of T. R. and Brown *18 
ably sustained the flagging fort urn 
of President Taft. The tin 
speakers were surprisingly good, all 
being very well pastid on their sub- 
j..ts Professor Sprague preside! 
ti ml whenever bloodshed threatened 
waved the olive branch with good 
effect . 

Following the triple flow of rhctori* 
the straw vote was taken under tin- 
direction of the senate. The bull 
moose ticket was successful with the 
exception of Uie state ticket which ran 
second to the republican. 
The |k»I1 was as follows : 





n »u 


TRKSIOKNT. 






Koosbvki.t. 


Wilson. 


Tan 


Ipll 




2'J 


88 


II 


11*14 




•M 


35 




Ills 




58 


43 


IN 


i§i< 




67 


54 




Specials 




11 


10 


;i 



Total 



202 



171 






Debs received 12 votes and Chatin 



For Vi 


ce President : 


Johnson 20 7 


Mashall 146; Sherman 


124. 






rOf OoVKKNOR. 






Walkkr. 


Hmn. 


Fos- 


1918 


42 


31 




1914 


;.ii 


41 


• 


1914 


71 


88 


j 


1916 


72 


64 




Specials 


18 


10 




Totals 


250 


184 


4('» 


Rand, 


prohibition, 


received 


OIK 


vote. 









'08. — A. J. Larned of Colrain i 
recovering from a very severe atta< 
of blood poisoning. 



DELAVAL 

CREAM- 
SEPARATORS 



Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

^' , HERE are special advantntros in using 
a (rood cream separator during tin- fall 
and winter months. 

The rri'k from cows long in lactation is 
h:ird<-st to «•!•••„. -(.-rind likewise liardtst t.i 
separate with ia inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and bntti-r prices are 
hik'hi-st. M th t the waste of gravity 6etting 
or a poor separator counts for n.ost 

Then there's the sweet, w irm skhn-milk 
for stock feeding, alone worth the iost of a 
. rator in cold weatbe r. 

There is surely no reason to delay the 

pun h..se of a s: p.- rator or to ronli:iu>- tbt 
rioroae. A IV Lav.l machine 
will sive its cost by spring, and nay be 
liom-'it < n s :nh litx rat terms if desired aa 
to actually pay for itself meanwhile. 

Sec your local De Laval agent 



THE DL? LAVAL 
SEPARATOR CO. 

, NEW ^ORK 

CHICAGO 

SEATTLE 
L MONTREAL 

V * /^IcfNIPEG 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

l>on't P(»rfl;et 

That we are carrying a good line of 

— Totuiooo 



RESULTS AT CHICAGO 

The western judging teams had 
things nearly their own way at the 
national dairy show. The team from 
this college made a very excellent 
showing, winning an individual prize 
and being fourth out of a list of 
14 colleges. The teams stood as 
follows : 

Nebraska, 

Iowa, 

Kansas, 

Massachusetts, 

Missouri, 

New York, 

Kentucky, 

South Dakota, 

Pennsylvania, 

Michigan, 

Delaware, 

( Mo, 

Maryland, 

New Hampshire, 



BIRDSUl 13 



FARRER 15 



RWAii.iiain IHM 

>i kphbn Lank Foi.okh 

MANOrAin-URINH JKWKI.KM 

I ho HKOAUWAV. NKW YOHK 

OUOl AND IHHililll 

1MNS AND HIMiS «* 

.11. SII.VKH AMD HNOKIR MBIMM 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



lain St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



II ere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



3544 
847C 
8881 
8880 
8896 
881 1 
8188 
8988 
•_".»«;:* 
8934 
8898 
8889 
8884 
•2H<»4 



THE SPRINGFIELD SCORES. 



M.A.C. 

16 

17 
10 
10 
LI 

11 
18 
81 

.-. 

5 

6 

:i 

I 

Reeords show that l.i games have 
been played with Y. M. ('. A. college 
of Springfield. Aggie has won sight 
games, lost four, and the game in 1908 
resulted in a ">-.*► tie. Chances of 
another victory for Massachusetts are 
very bright from present indications. 
The steady improvement of the team 
SittOS the Dartmouth game is expected 
to be still more evident in the New 
Hampshire state contests. 



1 88 1 
1900 
1901 
1909 
1909 
1904 
1909 
1 908 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1810 
111 11 



S.T.S. 

1H 

9 
i» 






4 


I 

IK 
IT. 

19 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

Some of the students in pomology 
have availed themselves of the bene- 
fits of competition during the past 
weeks, a few devoting their time to 
apple packing, while others turned 
theirjattention to apple judging. Lo- 
cal fairs have been attended, but for 
the most part the important work in 
selecting the teams for the Boston 
fruit show has been accomplished at 
the up-to-date fruit storage building 
recently erected by the college. 

The apple packing team is made 
up of J. W. Dayton, L. F. Drurv ami 
R. T. Neal. 

The apple judging team was chosen 
as follows: H. W. KUis, R. S. Fay. 
and A. F. Kdminister. Roth teams 
will start for PJOStOS on Thursday, 
the cutest in aSOS case taking place 
on Fridav. 



RECENT ALUMNUS DIES 

The many friends of Ralph ('. 
Robinson Ml will learn with sincere 
regret of his death in a Boston hospi- 
tal, Oct. 2"»th. A severe attack of 
typhoid fever confined him to the 
hospital and after an illness of two 
weeks he succumbed to the disease. 
To those who knew him in college, 
his death will come as a severe blow. 
His genial good-nature, his willing- 
ness to oblige others and his faithful 
performance of what he considered 
his duty endeared Robinson to his 
friends and classmates. His loyalty 
to the college was evinced by his 
steady participation in class and col- 
lege activities. He was a member 
of various clase athletic teams, a 
pioneer member of the Roister Dois- 
ters and of the first caste in "Aggie" 
dramatics. In recognition of his 
four years of faithful work on the 
varsity football field, the athletic 
council voted him the football M his 
senior year. I'pon graduation he 
followed up his major study— land- 
scape — and was engaged in this work 
in various parts of the Fast until his 
death. The class of 1911 will mourn 
the loss of a loyal classman and the 
college, a trua-hwrtad alunuaua. 



PLANNING FOR FRESHMAN 
NIGHT 

Hans for the entertainment to be 
given on the night of Dec. 7th by the 
freshman class, are now under wa\ . 
The committee appointed by the class 
to take charge of the matter OOBSlSSi 
of Danforth. Dunbar, Fox, Kennedy 
and Loth*. Several plans are under 
discussion but the one most favored 
will provide for some sort of 
musical entertainment. The pre- 
sentation of a short play and of a 

minstrel show are suggestions et- 

ing with favor in certain quarters. 
Several upper classmen of experience 

:,ie being < suited in the matter and 

should the entertainment, asgixen. 
prove a success, the freshman efeSS 
hopes to present it away from the col- 
lege. Moie definite announcement 
in regard to freshman night will be 
forth-coming later. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty 
<;od in Mis infinite wisdom to take to 
himself our beloved friend and class- 
mate, Ralph Lushing Robinson ; be it 

Resolved, That we the members of the 
class of 191 1 do extend to his family our 
sincerest sympathy in this, their hour of 
grief; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolu 
tions be inscnl>ed upon our class 
records, and that a copy be sent to the 
l>ereaved family and that a copy be pub 
lished in the CofcfQg Signal. 
For the class of 1911, 

I.konako M. Johnson, Sec. 




MASSACHUSETTS NORTHERN RAUWAY 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 



CAP A GOWNS 



lothe American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



Whereas, It has pleased Almighty 
(lod in His infinite wisdom to take to 
himself the mother of our beloved friend 
and classmate, Frank L Davis ; there- 
fore be it 

Resolved, That we, the memiten of 
the class of 1916, do extend to him our 
sincerest sympathy in this his hour of 
grief ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to him, and that a copy 
be published in the College Signal. 

C. H. Fbrnalo. 2M», Pres., 

F. A. Anokkson, Vice-Pres 

R. K. Wheeler, Sec, 

C. W. Curtin, 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



37 Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



For 

the 
Class. 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes sinned and Poiisned 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

0|i.n Sunday M»ln St. 

On way to Post Office. 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 5, 191a 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 

Amlierat, Mu«a. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts, 


10 15c 


ColUis, 


2 12c 


Cuffs, - 


2 1 2C 


Flam wash, 


48c per doz. 


Same, rough dry. 


- 30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam I'rcssing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Km 111 J. Bohukn. Anent.7 North Cottage 
KoWABD C, Ki>wvhi»>, Anent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN A DYER, Prop*. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



FORTY-SIXTH YEA.R 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Roan I, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association. 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternitv Conference. 

Stockbridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. D. Griggs, Fiesident 

J. W. Covill, Manager 

L. Kdgar Smith, Manager 

K. 11. Cooper, Manager 

W. s. Little. .Manager 

C. liokelund. Manager 

J. W. T. I assure, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

J. I). French, Manager 

(>. G. Anderson, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

L. G. Daviea, President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. McDougatl, President 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELKR and OI'TOMLTKISI 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strii i 

AMUEKST, MASH. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone jo- 4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Lights, &c. 
ft Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 



Wrltflit vV DHmoii 

Catalogues of 

gPemll «v \vint*T Gootu 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Collrice 
students and Athletes who want the re*l, tupri km 
articles for the various sports should insist apoa 
those bearinK the Wright & Ditson Trade Mark 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

the standard t»r 



Wright Ac Ditson Goods are 
all sports 

\\ .v i< . 1 1 i .v i^nraaorv 

U« Washington M . Boston, M 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Qulckrat Mi-tIc*. Beat Work, LowmI I'rlo" 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suita a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. t 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tal. No. J4J-4 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till n o'clock EVERY night 
Corner Amity anil I'lraaant Streets 



If you waut to be 

sOI.ll> WITH THK Mlil > 
you must have your clothes pressed and cleaned 

ATEFSTEIN'S 



II Amity at 



Maroon Store 



Pressing and Cleaning a »|>. clalty 

Mont hlx-ral ticket ayntein Id town 
Tel. 30.1-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1434-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



CARS 



Leave A0C1IE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AUGIK COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDLRLANO ST. BY. CO 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samael Bow 

Springfield Republi an 



a] 



A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 

The Republican gives the best rej > 
Agricultural College and Ami) 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 



Daily, $8. Sunday, %2- W • * 7, 



THE COLLEGE 




NOV M 1*12 

JoUefc 



■ 

Fff 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XX11I. 



Amherst. Mass., Tuesday, November 12. 19.2. 



No. 9 



FRESHMAN PIPES ALIGHT BROWN WINS CROSS COUNTRY SPRINGFIELD GAME SATURDAY FOOTBALL VICTORY 



When 19.15 Goes Down to Defeat, 14-a, 
in Past Oame. 

In one of tin- Lest intcrclass games 
MM on the campus, 1911 defeated 

the sophomores in tin- annual football 
HUM yesterday afternoon by the 
-,..re of 11-2. The sophomores 
Moved two points on 1 nitty in the 
first period ; and holding the fresh- 
men scoreless, tin- outcome of the 
game was very inueh in doubt until 
the third quarter. Then by a Mas- 
her of forward passes and straight 
football that the sophs weiv power- 
- to resist, the freshmen swept 
down the Held for a touehdown. 
After that the first-year men had 
tilings their own way. Kldridge, 
the freshman halfback played a bril- 
liant game. His forward-passing 
was excellent, he was ngood giotind- 
gainer and his spectacular carrying 
kick of the ball through a broken 
laid for 4<> yards was t»ue of tin 
features of the game llagar ran the 
freshman team well and carried the 
hall over the line twice. I'abner, 
MM fullback, played a good 
|MM and inaile his distance whenever 
called upon to cany the hall. Wil- 
I played a last game at end. 1 >>i 
the sophomores, Johnson and Rrooks 
played the best game. Johnson 
eanied the hall well and in the fust 
half otitpiinted Kldridge who was 
hurried by the sophomore line. The 
lines were very evenly matched 
le whole. 
y- the lirst period the sophomores 
> ^ he hall on their opj»oncnts' eight 
*^J* line. A fumble gave Kpst. -in 
W dl Is-hind his goal line and in 






•ting to rush it out he was 



c. '± il, scoring a safety and two 
-- ""* for 1916. No further score 



was made until the third period. 
The freshmen went at things with I 
rush. A series of passes ami two 
forward passes for long gains brought 
the ball to 'l.Vs right yard line and 
llagar carried the ball over. 
KldfMge kicked the goal. In the 
list period Johnson got off a long 
punt which Kldridge caught and 
tied through nearly the whole 

OpholOre Held back to the sophs' 
J -yard line. After a series of 
nislies. llagar carried the ball across 
the goal-line for a second toiichdow n. 

Murphy kicked the ball out to Kld- 
ridge who kicked the goal. 
The line-up : 

OI'HOMOKKS. FKESHMKN. 

Villiams, Fitzgerald, le 

re. Hisbee. Scheufde 

M|.tn (capt.), It rt, Plaisttd 

■ Her, H. White, lg rg, Verheck 

nry, c c, Taylor 

mister, rg lg, Whitney, Riche 

[Continued on page 3J 



Team Loses Last Run of the Season 
at Providence^ 

The cross count IV team linished 
its fall season by running the BfOWl 
university team at Providence Satur- 
day. The meet was won l>y Brown 
with the score of 15-46, the lower 
score winning. Tahcr, of Rrown 
who ran for America in the Olympic 
-aines was the star, easily winning 
lirst place and individual honors hy 
covering the four ami a ipiarter mile 
course in the fast time of SI minutes 
and •_'."> seconds. 

Koefl team was at liberty to run 
ten men and the lirst live men of 
each learn to finish, counts in the 
Moling. Rrown had nine entries. 
M 4. Chad live men running and 
was minus the services of Captain 

Whitney who is ineligible this nth. 

The Aggie runners all linished in 
Mod condition. The order of the 
contestants, and the points scored 
by cadi were as fottowe: 
Taber. Rrown. 

Cook, lh own, 

Roberts, Rrown. 

Coop, Rrown, 

Litchfield. Rrown. 

Richard-. M A < . 

Ilutchings, M. A. C. 

Dealey. Hiown, 

Shirley. M A. C, 

\\ alker. Urowu, 

Rak.r. M. A. < ., 

(olev, M. A. C, 

(lould. Rrown. 
Shellield of Brown dhl noi finish. 
This meet brought to a close the 
feet regular season of intercollegiate 
<ioss country running ■•' H « A. \ 
Three teams were met within the last 
mouth. The season was very en- 
couraging Be two Of the meets were 
victories. Vermont was defeated 
M»19 ami Tufts. :;i-2l. 



Expected to be Hard Contest. Captain 
Samson May be Out of Game. 



Over New Hampshire State at Man- 
chester, with Score ol ai-3. 



I 
-' 

4 
fi 

1; 
7 

'.» 

II 
If 



ARE YOU A QUITTER? 
With the Springfield gMM 10 mar 
at hand here is a paragraph from an 
.xrhange llial many might paste in 

their hats. 

"Any man in the cheeiim' lection 
who does not put his whole heart into 
the cheering t» » 9*0tor- We hftve 

plentv of tlwtt kind of (piittcrs among 
us, nieii who are willing to watch tin- 
men of the team- Mf team go out 
on the field and take the humps and 
bruises for the honor of the college, 
while th v lack the spirit to take 
even a sore throat in showing that 
team that they are behind them. To 

really eheef tin- man does not merely 

repeat the cheer in a low, dignified 
tone to his neighbor, or sing it to 
himself to get the musical effect, but 
he etokea aems mob*. He really tries 
to make ///> voice, with those of the 
others, reach the ears amd^thi minds 
of those men on the field." 



Another Springfield game is at 
hand and on the eve of the annual 
contest both teams haxe-ood •'dope" 
that would indicate the closest .011- 
i.-t since 1908 Who* the tWO rivals 
fought to a .'• to ■"» tie. lp to last 
Saturday the u Aggies' 1 looked a 

triit better but the defeat of Tnfts 
at the hands of the down liver ehv.n 
at Medl'ord Saturday appeals to have 
evened things up. 

There is no doilht but that the 

ICMeMMeette team eoder the eiii- 

cient coai hing of Dr. stride* has he- 
coine the StrOOfeel team that has rep- 
uted M. A. (' in lour years. 
This has I .ecu shown in the gradual 
but steady improvement that the 

eleven has been Making ArWB gi 

to giime 

The game that the team put up 
ftgelMl New llampshiie Mate and 

\\> reeuUittg score would indicate 

that th»' long season has had no evil 

,.iTeet- m< 1 there is m sign of 

staleness. The men are all in e I 

condition with MB exception of ( ap 
tain Sainson and possibly KdgertOO. 
••Rig San." is siiUering from h;^ 
injury in f.s.tball, I badlv p idled 
ligament in his left shoulder. lie 
will not be used in any o( the prac- 
tices this week but Dr Rihles thinks 
he ma, gel inloshapc b ' 'tmda\ 

in which event h. will undoi|l,ledl\ 
stall the game. 

" \\" RdgOTtM was given a r. wA 
ami used for only two MMtOI at 

Maiicheslei. lie has 1 11 auffertag 

from an injured nerve in his tight 
shoulder received in the Holy Vnttm 
game, but he is sure to be at his old 
position on the left end of the line 
when the whistle blows at Spi inglicld. 
(iraves is anotliei man who was 
not used in the New Hampshire game. 
||i» ankle is still weak but otherwise 
he is physically lit for his |i,,l en- 
counter with I Training school foe. 
lie will be used at fullback where lie 
is putting up a fast game. 

The student body under the direc- 
tion of ( hcei leader \\. J. Miidsall is 
making extensive preparations for 
attending the game as usual. It (a 
\d v doubtful if a single man will be 

left at the college to lillg the chapel 
bell after the game. 

Three monster mass meetinga 
will be held to arouse enthusiasm. 
The lirst of these will come tonight 
when there will be several speakers 
and a rehearsal of the cheers and 
songs. Thursday evening, weather 
permitting. ■ mass meeting will be 
held outdoors around the fort. A 



[Continued on page tl 



Before ■ crowd of over .*i,00(l spec 
tators New llampshiie State went 
down to Ctnahllag defeat at the hands 
..f the Massachusetts Ajjgie football 
team at Varick 1'aik, Manchester, 
N. II . Saturday afternoon. The 
field was soft and slow, making hard 
tackling dillicult, hoi the game was 
spectacular and well worth seeing. 

The preeeaee "f the entire N. 1 

Hampshire Stale college student 
body headed by their military band 
pushed the home team to its best but 
they were no match for their speedier 

opponents fi the Ray State and 

v.rv seldom wits there opportunity 
..Held them to get mar the Aggie 
line. The Maroon players while not 
showing their best form put up I 

1 1 game; the !>«•«■ keN •■ ''"■ 

defense and on the offense opened 
big holes through which "Mike" 
Rrewer * plunged in his twisting 
rushes tiorc at quarter played a 
nerw. heady game and in addition 
to causing the ball oxer for tVO 
touchdowns should have credit fa 

three limes bringing to the ground 
Hampshire players who had 

broken clear of the teW and were <>n 

the road toward the Aggie goal. 
Smilh was :. consistent groeNftd gitinci 
and got "" wOeee beautiful puuls. Me 
of them s|.ii.dling for I full .'..'» yai-l- 
t 111 ran repla... I Captain Samson 
when the hitter was injured and 
although outweighed, held his man 
and got in s.veial hard tackles. Kor 
\, m llampshiie Rrackelt and WikmI- 

maii ■tarred. The game in detail •.— 

V m llampshiie won the toss ami 
chos. to defend the south goal. 
Samson kicked off for M. A. ( . 
•,nd New llampshiie ran the ball to 
their L". yard line. The first scrim- 
p found the Aggie line unyield- 
ing and on tin- mxt play an 
attempted forward pass was gathered 
in by Massachusetts Then in rapid 
succession by wing shifts and end 
runs Rrewer gained JO \ards, Nisson 
10 ami then live. Smith seven ami 
Rrewer l«'-, bringing the ball to New 
Hampshire's 1 .". \ aid line. Two line 
bucks by Riewcr netted 10 yards and 
Smith then took the ball over for the 
first touchdown after two and one- 
half minutes of play. Samson 
kicked goal and the score stootl 7-0. 

Samson kicked oil to l'eavev who 
was thrown on his M yard line A 
forward pass went out of bounds but 
the next one netted New Hnmpshiie 
gg vards by way of their right end 
Our line held and then after I slight 
gain Woodman punted to Gore 
[Rrewer gained four yards ami after 



It 



The College Signal. Tuesday. November 12, 1912 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12, 191a. 



Melican failed to connect with a for- 
ward pass due to the soft condition 
of the field Smith got off a long punt 
to New Hampshire's 30 yard line. 
A fumble and an incomplete forward 
pass forced Woodman to resume the 
piuiting duel and the ball was 
Aggie's on her 43 yard line. Real- 
izing our superiority in the exchange 
of kicks Smith soon returned the ball 
to their 28 yard line. Twice the 
New Hampshire line gave way and 
their backs were thrown for losses, 
Smith came around on our right end 
and broke up a double forward pass 
and then Woodman dropped back to 
punt. "Big Sam," the Aggie cap- 
tain, crashed through the Granite 
State line and blocked the punt on 
their 12 yard line and it seemed as 
if Aggie would score again. The 
tide turned, however, when Brackett, 
the fleet New Hampshire quarter got 
away with a forward pass and was 
only stopped by Maker after a 40 
yard gain. A loss and then another 
pass gave them first down by one 
foot. IMssel was replaced, Foster had 
taken his place for a short time ami 
the period ended with New Hamp- 
shire holding the ball on our 40 yard 
line. Score 7-0. 

The Granite players came back 
with a rush and made first down 
easily. Dole was knocked out for a 
moment but pluckily went back into 
play. A fumble and slight gains 
were followed by a forward pass, in 
blocking which Samson was laid out 
with a strained tendon in his shoul- 
der. Curran replaced Samson and 
from our 30 yard line Woodman 
dropped over a field goal. Score 7-3. 

Dole put the ball into play on the 
kickofT and l'eavey received on their 
42 yard line. Twice the New Hamp- 
shire backs were thrown back for 
heavy losses and Woodman punted 
to Brewer. Tackled heavily, Brewer 
lost the ball in falling and Clark 
recovered it. Holding cost Massa- 
chusetts 10 yards, and weak tackling 
on our part gave New Hampshire 
further gains. A forward pass was 
gathered in by Brewer, Harris was 
taken out, Jennison was put in at 
left tackle and Peavey moved to 
guard, and after slight gains Massa- 
chusetts punted to Brackett. For a 
time nothing could stop the New 
Hampshire aggregation and their 
cheering section went wild as long 
gains brought the Blue and White 
players to our 25 yard line. Dole 
spoiled a forward pass and Wood- 
man's try for another field goal was 
unsuccessful. The ball was scrim- 
maged on our 2.5 yard line. After a 
gain of 25 yards in two rushes by 
Brewer and Smith the half ended. 

In the third period Howe replaced 
Nissen. New Hampshire kicked 
and Melican returned the ball 
eight yards. Play after play gained 
ground for Massachusetts, Brewer 
tearing off 15 yards in four plays, 
and Gore gaining 12 on a forward 
pass and four on a line plunge. In 
the shadow of their goal posts, New 



Hampshire stiffened and held and 
Aggie failed of first down by six 
inches on their five yard line. Howe 
and O'ltrien stopped all gains on the 
next three plays and after an incom- 
plete forward pass Aggie again took 
the ball on the enemy's 20 yard line. 
Smith was knocked out for several 
moments and after a slight gain and 
then a loss Brewer made a clean pass 
to Gore, who catching the ball with 
the sun glaring in his eyes fell across 
the line for the second touchdown. 
Smith kicked out and from the 18 
yard line Brewer made goal. Score 
14-8. 

Massachusetts kicked to New 
Hampshire and after several gains 
they were held twice An incomplete 
forward pass was followed by a sue 
cessful one that lacked six inches of 
gaining first down and the ball went 
to Massachusetts. Short gains were 
followed by a fake kick that netted 
us 12 yards. A forward pass was 
interrupted by New Hampshire and 
the quarter ended. Peavey was 
replaced by Keardon. 

Nissen replaced Howe and after 
losses the ball came to Massachusetts 
and Smith tried for a field goal. 
The ball went wide and scrimmage 
was resumed on their 25 yard line. 
Sustaining a five yard loss New 
Hampshire essayed another forward 
pass. It was intercepted and Brewer 
and Nissen crashed through their 
line in four plays that brought the 
ball within one half foot of the goal 
line. On the next play Dole opened 
a hole and Gore shot out of sight 
and over the goal line with the ball. 
When the referee had pried the 
tangled mass of players apart it was 
seen that "Aggie's" quarter had 
gotten the ball over the line a foot. 
Brewer kicked goal and the score 
stood 21-3. 

Smith put the ball into play and 
New Hampshire gained steadily. 
Twice when their man had gotten 
clear of the field and Gore alone 
blocked the way, touchdowns were 
prevented by his sure tackling. 
Massachusetts regained the ball on 
her 35 yard line and Smith punted 
for 40 yards. New men were put in 
and the play increased in vigor ; 
Thompson went in for Jennison, 
Baker was replaced by O'Brien at 
tackle and Kdgerton went to end. 
In the last six minutes Huntington 
replaced Brewer and Wood took 
Griffin's post. In the last few 
moments the New Hampshire line 
held steadily and after two success- 
ful attempts, Dole gained 12 yards 
on a forward pass through the center. 
The game ended with the ball in 
Massachusetts's possession on our 
50 yard line. 

Between the halves and after the 
game Manchester and Fitchburg 
high schools played a stubbornly con- 
tested game in which the fast Man- 
chester boys won by a score of 53-0. 

The line up : 

MASSACHUSETTS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Melican, re re, Corriman 

Baker, O'Brien, rt rt, Williams 



UP-TO-DATE 



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Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



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Refia>untit>le Hdtea) 



E. B DICKINSON D. D S. 

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New line of samples just received 
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Style as well as Quality are Narked 
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C.riffin, Wood.rg rg, Willard 

Dole.c c, Holton 

Kisenhaure, lg, 

Ig, Haines, Peavey, Reardon 
Samson, Curran, It 

It, Peavy, Jennison, Thompson 
O'Brien, Kdgerton, le, le, Clarke 

Gore, qb qb, Brackett 

Smith, rh rh, Bissel, Koster 

Brewer, Huntington, Ih Ih, Jones 

Nissen. Howe, fb ft>, Woodman 

Referee— Stevenson of Kxt-ter. Urn. 
pjre— Foley of Amherst. Head lines- 
man—Kane of Villa Nova. Touch- 
downs—Gore 2, Smith. Goals fiom 
touchdowns- Brewer, Dale and Smith. 
Field goal— Woodman. Time- 15 min- 
ute periods. 

FRESHMAN SOCCER TEAM 
The fast Holyoke high school soc- 
. , 1 team defeated the M. A. C fresh- 
men Saturday by the score of 2 to 1. 
Hi.' game was played <>n the campus 
li.ld and was close and exeiting 
throughout. llolyoke's tiiwt goal 
was rather a lucky one and M. A. C. 
missed several chances by narrow 
margins. 



SPRINGFIELD SATURDAY 

[Continued from page i] 



FRESHMAN PIPES ALIGHT 

(Continued from first pagaj 

Ihde. rt li. Sihloiterbeck 

Brooks, Bishop, re 

le, Hagar, Murphy. Wilcox 
Mrauss, qb qb, Epstein, Hagar (cap« ) 
lol.nson. Ihh lhb, Cate, Murphy 

Little, Alden, rhb rlib. Kldridge 

Whorf, Fuller, fb lb, Palmer 

Referee— Chapman '07. Headlines- 
man- Huntington '13. Linesmen— Pike 
15. Mac Donald '16 I im.-rs Gore '13, 
Freeborn '14 Touchdowns Hagar 2. 
Gods from touchdown- Kldridge 2. 
safety -Epstein. 



bonfire will be built in the center of 
the pit and members of the team and 
of the faculty will be ealled upon for 
Kpceches. The last football mass- 
meeting before the game and the last 
of the year will be on Friday evening. 

A special train has been chartered 
which will leave Amherst at 12 noon, 
Saturday. The run to Springfield 
will be made in approximately 50 
minutes. Three hundred students 
will go down on the spatial and Ml 
more have planned to go down ear- 
lier. Those who do go earlier will 
meet the train at the I'nion station 
in Springfield. 

Headed by the college baud, the 
student l»ody will march to l'ratt lield 
where a large section of the east 
stand is to be reserved for the "Ag- 
gie" cheering section. The singing 
and cheering thisyeai promises to be 
even better than last year. This 
part of the program has come to In- 
one of the features of the contest. 
Hirdsall '13 will lead the cheering 
and will be assisted by Brown '14 
ami l'ellett '14. The singing will be 
iiinler the direction of Griggs '18. 

After the game there will be 
the usual theatre parties and the 
"sophs" will hold their smoker. The 
special train will pull out on the re- 
turn trip at 11-30 reaching Amherst 
shortlv after midnight. 




How can you better 
express good-fellow- 
ship and free-handed, 
open-hearted wel- 
come than by bring- 
ing out pipes and 
papers and opening 
up a generous jcr or 





Tobacco of choicest 
growth — delightful in 
its fragrance— posses- 
sing a flavor of satis- 
fying smoothness— 
with not a hint of burn 
or bite to mar its 
natural richness. The 
most lavish liberality 
cannot go beyond this. 






4@flsXt*ytif+U, J%mm*> <Zi 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACKINAWS 




The Fall season is the Sweater time of the year. The Football 
Barnes call for Mackinaws and Sweaters. W't: are showing the 
hist styles of the best makers. No fancy prices in this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College pbotograpbm . 



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New York City equipment obtainable 



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In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

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Everything Electrical 



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American Fountain Pan Company 

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The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12, 191s. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College 

BOARD OF EDITOR9 

K. H,VANZW\1.I- Nr.lKG'n.Kditor in Chief 
CHKSTKR R.WIIKKI.KK i 1 . Manmina Editor 
OSCAKfi.ANDKK'ON'M. Assistant Editor 
FREDERICK D.GRIGGS »IJ. Athletic Kdit-.r 

s MILLER JORDAN 'ij, Athletic l".dit..i 

HARRY W. AM EN'13, Alumni Editor 

STUART I'. POSTER '14, C -minis Editor 

ERVINE E. PARKER *M, Alumni Editor 
HAROLD C. BLACK '14, I)«p;ntment Editor 

J.ALBRKT PRICK 'i,. Associate Editor 

GEOK(iE H DONN1 I.L'iv Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
GEORGE ZAHKISKIE 2d. '13. Hus. Man;mer 
ERNEST 5. CI.ARK.IR.'u Asst Hus Manager 
ERNEST P.UPTOK'14. Asst. Adv Mm 
MAURICE J. < I ( IGH '15. Circulation 

Subscription $1 50 r*r vear Slnele 
copies. 5 cents. MaWe all orders rayable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd 

Pnt«w»«1 ■* ieconH-r'»«« mattar ■« tha »Tiher»» 

Vol. XXIII. Tcksi>ay. Nov. 12. No 9 



Thk.ke is bo ttaataslty of pointing 

the why to M. A. ('. men when the 

annual Springfield game is at hand : 
tin- rbrm **S|>i-in«rtl«-lcr* is enough. 
Tin- college has beMad it ■ reeord <>f 
which an eoHaga might be pardon- 

ably proud. For the |»:ist three 
years the people <»f [\\n Ingilllll town 

have looked v\itli genuine inrpriai or 

the spirit shown by the RRpporten 

of a defeated team, and asked, "what 

would they do if they won?" This 
year's team is the best thai any pree* 
ent undergraduate has seeu hattle for 
the Maroon and White. The support 
to hind it must bt better thai ever lie- 
fore. Freshmen — everyone. I»e at 
all the mass meetings this week and 
eateh a little of the old-time enthus- 
iasm. It will Ik- in the air. lid 
that "pep" whieh has in years gone 
hy, sent teams with great odds against 
them and possessing less footliali 
anility than the present one, to vic- 
torv over our old rivals. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

(Notice* for this column should he dropped in 
the Signal Officeor h m led to Muart It. Eosler 
'14, on or before Satuid iv |.re> td inn each issue.] 

Nov. 19, B*tQ r. m. Schubert String 
(Quartet in Chapel. Admis- 
sion, RJ eents. 

Nov. II, Ml P. m.— M. A. C. 
Christian ■aaoristtoa in 
Chapel. 

Nov. 1<», •>-.•?(» p. R.— Football, In- 
ternational Y. It, C'. A. col- 
lege at Springfield. 

Nov. 17, 9-15 A. M. — Sunday Chapel. 
Knbbi Stephen S. Wise of 
New York. 

Nov. 19, 7-00 P. v.— Stoekltridge 
cluh. BOOOI G South college. 

Nov. 20, 1-30 i\ m. — Assembly. 
President Butterliehl, Mass 
meeting. 



In view of the result of Monday's 
game, the senior class has passed a 
rule that all freshmen shall at all 
times while on campus carry a full 
supply of the tl makin's." 



CAMPUS NOTES 

That New Hampshire trip did 
look good, hut the empty BOISei 
resulting from the Tufts game rather 
dimmed our sight. 

Indoor hockey practise started 
Thurday evening in the drill hall. 
A large sipiad included a number of 

freshmen reported. 

Would that there might he more 
asM'inblv speakers like .lames J. 
Storrow. It's safe to say that the 
usual sleepy heads postponed their 
naps. 

Work 011 the grounds about Flint 
laboratory has commenced with the 
removal of three spruce trees which 
hid the front of the building from 
the walk. 

••Are you going to Springfield?" 
is Foolish (Question, No. '.»'.»'.». Kvei v 
Aggie man will be there Saturday as 
alwavs, so save vour voice and 
energy for the big show. 

H. D. Ilrowu has been elected 
chairman of the junior prom com- 
mittee. The prom is to be held 
Feb. II, Valentine- day. a fact 
which will, no doiilit, be of assist- 
ance to the committee on decoration-. 

The speed with which the hash 
house is appioaching completion is 
alarming. At the present rate, we 
mav be able to desert the "bread 
line" by mid-years, but the chances 
seem to be in favor of Commence- 
ment. 

Owing to the disqualification of 
('apt. Whitney of the cross-country 
team a try out was held Friday morn- 
ing to determine who would till his 
place. Colev 'ID. Warner '1 I and 
Lucas 'I I were the starters and Colev 

c o v e r ed the course to North Ajnherst 

and back lirst and so made the trip 
to Providence with the team. 



bourn's lecturing was no less inter- 
esting than his experiments ; he 
kept up a continual stream of amus- 
ing explanatory statements that kept 
liis audience in continual good humor. 
\- a fitting climax for the evening 
he made a tower of blocks fall and 
exploded gunpowder by striking a 
tuning fork ten feet away from the 
object-. 



FRESHMEN PLANNING FOR 
DEC. 7. 

The committee on the freshmen 
show has accomplished very little 
during the past week. Several plans 
for the show have been talked over 
but nothing definite has been decided 
on as vet. A farce or short eomedv 
i- favored by some of the committee 
while others want to have a vaude- 
ville and minstrel show. The com- 
mittee is very anxious to make the 
show a success and while they ad- 
mit being a little slow in starting 
they intend to make the finish a 
strong one and to make the fust 
freshman night an event to be re- 
membered. 




ClK 

Pheasant 

Bntitt? St.. 
Bmbcret 

Telephone 470 



HKIAKI- AST 

I IMIieON 
AKT>KN(M>N TBA 

Pinner if arranged for. 



RIFLE PRACTICE BEGINS 

This week a schedule of the availa- 
ble hours of rifle practii 
posted. The indoor range will be 
Opefl much more than usual, in order 
to give new men a chance to prac- 
tice. The best of efforts are to be 
put forth, so that the reputation of 
Aggie's rifle teams may be upheld. 
Kveryoiie who has had any expe- 
rience in rifle shooting or any who 
EM interested are urged to join the 
rille club at once and come out for 
the team. Saturday the outdoor 
rille range was closed for the winter. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



SOCIAL UNION 

Fully three-fifths of the student 
body and a large number of faculty 
and guests were very well entertained 
in the chapel Saturday evening 
by the remarkable experiments of 

Bene B. Wllboorn, a Chaotanqaan 

lecturer, producing temperatures with 
certain chemical compounds high 
enough to burn nails, operating 
machinery from a distance by sound, 
ami using selenium to make light 
produce noise were some of the most 
remarkable operations. Mr. Wil- 



NORTH H1PTQN 2tZ 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER II 



Henrietta CniMinin s Greatest 3ucce*s 



• • 



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EVERY NIGHT 

Prices 25c, 50c and 75c 



MATINEE WED. AND SAT. 

Prices 2Sc and 50c 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— OK — 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODKRN KKPAIKING DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY TONIC 



Kid ridge '14 



Rendall *i6 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full tine of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



PROFESSOR WAIGH TALKS ON CAMERAS 



Interesting Facts Told Landscape Art Club 

of Similar Talks 



First of a Series 



The landscape art club met Tues- 
day night at Wilder hall and were 
addressed by Professor Waugh on 
• -Photography." This was the first 
,if several lectures to be given on the 
Mibject, and the speaker limited him- 
self to the mechanical Appliances of 
photography — the camera, lens, and 
diutter. Hy way of introduction 
Professor Waugh first Rotated out 
he fact that the best way to learn 
photography is to go through all the 
Steps of the work oneself rather than 
nierelv press the button and let 
■ORtaOM else finish the pictures. All 
.eras are essentially alike in that 
Ihev provide a dark chamber with a 
holder at one end for plates or films, 
and at the other an opening for a 
l.-ns. Modifications of these- essen- 
tiaU form the different types of cam- 
era, among which may be mentioned 
ilie Kodak, the view camera and the 
.aiueras of the reflecting type. 
Hi. ie are three types of lenses, the 
meniscus, the rapid rcctilingar, ant! 
the atiastigmatic The first is the 
rem cheapest and is sold in all eam- 
, costing less than $10. Its 
draw Lacks are its inability to 01- 
i.ctly reproduce s'raight lines (called 
ipRirtoll aberration), its inability to 
focus differently coloicd objects 
-harply at the same time (chromatic 
nation), and it* astigmatism (in- 
ability to focus all things in the 
-a me plane sharply) 

The tteeni. type of lens, s|M)ken of 
as the "K. H " lens is made up of 
two meniscus lenses, so built that 
ii correct* the faults of the other- 
Hv this construction, spherical ami 
chromatic aberration are eliminated. 
Saea lenses are used on cameras 
costing lietween $10 and $25. The 
third type, the anastigmatic, is made 

\.n ie the third fault of the 

lenses, astigmatism. Its construc- 
1 is very complex and ex|»en8ive, 
and it contains four or six separate 
elements Such lenses cost any- 
where from $25 to WOO. 

Professor Waugh next devoted 

• time to the consideration of the 

-peed of a lens. This brought up 

the discussion of aperture and mcth- 

of grading lenses. The final 

lesion of the talk was on shutters. 

two types of shutters, hetween- 

ii*. and focal-plane shutters 

were shown in different cameras, and 

their relative merits were made 

read 

v general discussion followed the 
and the cameras used to illus- 

1 the lecture were more closely 
land Then Vice-President Cul- 

1' , poke 011 the membership of the 
iad urged those of the audience 
H ere not members to join. The 

eh hopes to extend to usefulness 
ulaige its membership greatly 

i>. . coining year. The officers are 



II. II. Bursley, president; F. II. 
Culley, vice-president ; I). F. Baker, 
secretary and treasurer; and W. S. 
Little, chairman of the program 
committee. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Again the regular association meet- 
ing on Thursday evening will give 
place to a mass meeting and bonfire 
on the campus. This follows in line 
with the spirit and enthusiasm of the 
college on the eve of the big game. 
Last week a good many students 
attended the association meeting in 
spite of the heavy rain, foohall signal 
practise, and a hockey meeting. 
President I>a\ics gave a Ml report 
on the work which the V. M. C. A. 
is doing in many New Kngland col- 
leges. He emphasized the need of 
college men to help in assimilating 
the foreign element properly in the 
Halted States and also in the develop- 
ment of lM>ys' clubs near the college 
community. He pointed out that the 
immigrants encouraged to enter our 
country to help run the ever increas- 
ing number of manufacturing plants 
at a low wage, are often bitterly 
antagonistic- toward the American 
people and their government. The 
work of the college man lies in teach- 
ing tin-in the truth and in making 
them loyal American citizens 

The development of Ik»vs' clubs in 
this vicinity has lieen very successful. 
A few years ago Harold M. (Jorge 
and Paul Larsen started boys' clubs, 
holding meetings frequently, leading 
the 1k>vb in all kinds of athletic con- 
tests, ami also aiming to teach them 
right thinking and useful living. 
Track meets and other contests have 
been held, creating the right kind of 
rivalry lietween the clubs. 

Since Paul Larsen has not returned 
to college this year. Harold (iore will 
assume the entire responsibility at 
the close of the football season. 

I or the time and effort expended 
this work has its own reward, and a 
few students are ueeded to help in 
organizing more boys" clubs. Influ- 
ential men of past and present gen- 
erations testify to the benefit derived 
in associating with men or Itoys 
younger than themselves. 

One week from Thursday night 
"Dick" Powers will speak. The aim 
of the association is to have members 
of the student hotly take charge of 
informal meetings during the year, to 
make the meetings brief and interest^ 
ing. Every student has nt least one 
subject on which he is well informed 
perhaps a trifle better than his fellow 
students. Moreover a college man 
should be a thinking man, and should 
he willing to express his ideas in 
exchaneg for those of his fellows. The 
association meetings are planned for 
just this feature and the announcement 
concerning "Dick" Powers should 
insure a large gioup of listeners at 
the next meeting which will be held 
at the usual time G-4.'). 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 

Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, containing the right amounts ,,( 
avtiilttblf nitrogen, in both chemical anil organic fonns, with an tRCtM 
of soluble and reverted, phosphoric acid, both for fertilizing and cataly/ 
ing effects, and the proper amount and light foim of potash, all thor- 
oughly blended together and in forms that will not cake, but remain in 
a drillable condition, and which will act not only in the beginning, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the needs of the ciop and 
market requirements), are what the practical fanner should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops. Above all things, he should avoid nnbal 
anced and impropei mixtures that have the defect of one element U-ing 
insoluble and another element too soluble for successful plant growth. 



Stuth' the Plant hood Problem 
— There is something in it. — 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



F. A. SHERARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimcrs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 







That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C A K 

CAMPION, sole Aie^iit 



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OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 

VVe make them all and make them right at 




3N/I 





Colk'ife Stores. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12, 191a. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Hiass Pip*. Valves 
and Pitting* for Steam, Water an<l Ga*. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and I'liie Coverings. I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supi lies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating. 
Automat. c Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kngi'e 
Connections. Holyoke. Mass. 



theTlachers Exchange 

Of Boston 120 Boy/tton St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



M 



C&rptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and (artful atteniion. 
Fnlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and iVittails for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
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Nash BlocK, Amherst 



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Studio Phone 303-2. 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

1 *i f? 7 - 1 Standard of Excellence for over 50 Veara ) 1 O I t£ 

QUALITY ™ MEAWS ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study Fff iciency and Economy in the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer; hut It Does Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount of the Highi Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER to .... et tbc retirements 
of every crop on every kind of soil. Our eaoetta (•*» are 

practical farmers) will be glad to assist you in making your selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Value** than are 
the Host Expert Chemists. Let Your Crops Prove to Vou 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

Beware of those fertilizers whose only < on.n.endation is a "cut' in pi ice. 
This is an admission of one of two things— either ll.ey have been too 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials. 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station: — "The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends not so much upon what is paid for it, as upon the 
character of the materials used to make it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS BS* oeen proven during over fifty years' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be " just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will be 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



A. C. WINS APPLE PACK- 
ING CONTEST 

TK.VM Ml I HSJ TKOI'HY OOP, 

The M. A. 0. apple packing team 
won a sweeping first place in the 
intercollegiate apple packing con- 
test held in Boston, Friday. Nov. Nth. 
The contest was under the manage- 
ment of the New Kngland federation 
of agricultural students, in connec- 
tion with the Massachusetts fruit 
show. 

The M. A. C team was comi>osed 
of K. T. Neal, L. F. Drury, and J. 
W. Dayton. On the box packing 
contest they scored 191.1 points out 
of A possible :WM». followed by New 
Hampshire with 2.V.», ami Vermont 
with M l.o. On the barrel work M. 
A. C. scored 2H7..'». New Hampshire 
Mt.So, and Vermont MS. 

For high individual stores the fol- 
lowing were made : 

Hi x patkug, iJiury, M A C, 
Neal. M. A I . 

Braky, Vl - 
Barrel s*« ki.R. Datum, M. h. < 

Ne.il. II. A. C 
Drury, M A. I 

Hear, N. M. 

The team winning the contest waa 
nwarded a silver trophy cup. Neal. 
by making two close seconds, won the 
high iadivtdual score and was ptc- 
scntcd with a silver cup by the 
department of pomology. 

An apple judging contest was held 
under the same management BO Un- 
packing contest. New Hampsh in- 
won first by a narrow margin 
of five point! M. A. C. 

repieselited by H. S. Fay, B W. 
FH.s sad A F. F«lminster won 
second, with Vermont third. The 
high individual scores were Osgood. 
N. II. M7, Fdminster, M. A. ('. *•"», 
raj, M. A. ( v. 



97 

• rr> 

961 

94 



BIG TIME AHEAD FOR STOCK- 
BRIDGERS. 

The weekly meeting of the Stock- 
bridge club will be Mid Nov. li», in 
the social union room. Membersof the 
faculty will M present, also a keg of 
eider, so good feeling and a bettei 
acipiaintauce of club members new 
and old may Ik; looked for. Short 
talks will be given by membersof 
the faculty and of the dub. All clu! 
members and those interested in tin 
work of the organization are invited 
to attend. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The second Sunday chapel pf Ik. 
year w:is addressed by the Kt. Uev 
Thomas F. Davics of Springfield, tin 
Episcopal Bishop of Western Mass:. 
• liii>etts. In his talk he brought 
out the thought that the church i- 
an oiganization for the combatting 
of evil. All who honestly I 
the betterment of the world can b. 
appl\ their efforts through such 
fighting organization. 

The speaker next Sunday will b< 
Uabbi Stephen S. Wise of the fn- 
synagogue of New York city. 

COLLEGE PHOTOGRAPHrR 
CHOSEN 

I.. B. Howard '14, has been SO 
pointed by Professoi Waiigh as 
official college photographer \ 

competitive test was held inwhiili 
time candidates tis.k part. How 
has had considerable previous exp« - 
rienee and has been working f 
local photographer. 



ASSEMBLY 

Hon. James J. Storrow of Boston, 
formerly president of the Boston 
chamber of commerce, was the 
speaker at the Wednesday assembly. 
Mr. Storrow, who was a member of 
the varsity crew while at Harvard, 
gave an interesting account of his 
activities while in college and after- 
wards in business and public life, 
pointing out the constant danger of 
overemphasizing some one thing to 
the exclusion of other interests He 
said in part : 

"Both in college and out, don't 
allow yourself to exaggerate the 
importance of any one thing. Mak- 
ing a living is important ; but don't 
buy your success at such a price that 
vou stop culti\:.ting yotir friends. 
Fach one owes a duty to society. 
When you get out of college, do 
something for the community in 
which you live. Keep step with the 
younger men | and keep in touch with 
as many classes of people as possible 
to get a broader viewpoint. Many 
young men at the beginning of their 
business career become discouraged. 
Be useful— don't try to get something 
for nothing. You can succeed if you 
are willing to pay the price. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

At a recent meeting of the Stock- 
hiid»c club, the results of the 00B 
MM) at the New Fngland fruit sh"» 
were given. The packing ten 
which waa awarded first place. 1 
sisted of Neal, Dayton and Dr.n 
The judging team, consisting of FUN. 
Fay and FdmiiiHtcr, made second 
place in their contest. The in 
ridm] restdt showed Fdminster 1 
in second place, and Fay, third. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

I III -IIMW MAM III -I ' I.ASH SHOWI 

The competition for places on 
college weekly has been in progn 
since the first of the year, and up 
the present time the freshmen li 
made the best record. This is pan 
due to the fact that the frcsmen 
an early start in most hsftM 
Within the last few days Rus- 
(lay, and L F Smith have hand' 
their names for 1914, while 1>' 
has joined the sophomore delcga 
To avoid any mistakes, men oil 
to enter the competiion should 
in their names at the Signal i 
box. 

All competitors must hand it 
signments on time in order to n 
any credit. Although MMM 
material does not receive M 
credit, it will doubtless affect 
final standing of competitors aji 



sj 
■ 



111 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATORS 



Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

'PHERE are special advantages In using 
1 a good cream separator during the fall 
and winter months. 

The milk from cows long in lactation is 
hardest to cream.— and likewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
highest, so that the waste of gravity setting 
or a poor separator counts for most 

Then there's the sweet, warm skim-milk 
for stock feeding, alone worth the cost of a 
acparator in cold weather. 

There is surely no reason to delay the 
purchase of a separator or to continue the 
use of an inferior one. A De Laval machine 
will give its cost by spring, and may be 
In night on such liberal terms if desired as 
mally pay for itself meanwhile. 

See your local De Laval agent 



THE DE LAVAL 
_ SEPARATOR CO. 

«T . >0RK 

a CHiCA' 

SAN FRANC 

MTL.E 
MONTREAL 
** WINNIPEG 



eiably. Contestants are requested to 
use the regulation Fnglish composi- 
tion paper, and to write only on one 
side, and to hand in editorials, cam- 
pus notes and other news in addition 
toany assignments given them. 

Assignments will hereafter be given 
out on Wednesdays at the Sn;\\i 
office from 1 to 1-20 P. It. Those 
wishing to secure information con- 
cerning a newspaper may procure 
books by applying to the college 
librarian. 'The Making of a News 

paper'* by Gives is recommended. ami 

freshmen who have Professor Neal's 
composition book will find helpful 
information under the heading of 
journalism. A copy of the rules gov- 
erning the competition will be placed 
on the Signal bulletin near the east 
door of North college. 

The standing of the various com- 
petitors to Nov. 10th is as fo'lows : 
I'.Hl. 

Hogg <>.:» 

Basse!! 

(lay 

L, F. Smith 

P.M.V 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

\n l>eing baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Mavc you tried them? 

I><»ta*t Koriec-t 

That we are carrying a good line o( 

TTotMSOOO 



BIRDSALL '13 



FARRER 15 



■moi.i.iiiii imrj 

SlllMIKN I , \ N K. POLOBI 
NANDrACI 1 i«ino JKOTKI.KM 

ism HW«»AI»W AY. NKW M.HK 

< I.I II \M» < Ol.l.Kl.i; 
PfSJSJ AM) KINtJM .* 

o. tu.VRR «nh 1.H0V/.K MO****** 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



Basil 




(alia id 


3.06 


Me Lain 




Draper 




itlf. 




Cuitin 


ll.r.s 


Rogers 


B.tl 


Ha nocks 


ft. 11 


( 'hamherlain 


Lift 


Hulsizer 


1.22 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes 



lain St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



1 here are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

MM 1 I" 

The annual chrysanthemum exhibi- 
tion waa held in French Hall on Sat- 
urday. Oct. K, and waa the most 
successful ever given. 

The college exhibited specimen 
blooms of many of the new varicii. - 
which were cut, labeled ami staged 
by members of the senior class. 

She members of the junior class 
gave an exhibition of table decora- 
tions using chrysanthemums for de- 
flowers, and autumn foliage, ferns, 
smilax and asparagus as acccesories. 
There were sixteen tables entered in 
the competition and these were 
arranged with more taste and skill than 
has been previously shown. Three 
prizes were given : a copy of Scott's 
Manual valued at $5 as first prize. A 
cash prize of $3 for second and $2 
for third. The first prize was 
awarded to Miss L. F Bates, of 
Kingston; the second to H. W. 
Levine, of Roxbury and third to Miss 
S. J. Strange, of Mansfield. 

On Monday evening Professor 
White attended the Silver .Jubilee 
banquet of the New Knglaud Florist's 
and Gardeners' club. On Tuesday 
evening M gave a talk on "Fdueation 
for Florists" to the Holyoke Florists' 
and Gardener's club. 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



'10. — Frank L Thomas who has 
been engaged in state nursery inspec- 
tion during the summer and fall has 
returned to college to resume his 
graduate work in entomology. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
•71.— W. II. Howkeris still doing 
business at the old stand, 48 Chatham 
street, Koston, where he first put out 
his shingle in lHTt'.. He has recently 
renewed his lease for another period, 
which when completed will make 1 1 
years in the same olliee, over Faneuil 
Hall bank. 

'75. — Dr. Madison Hunker has re- 
tired from active veterinary practice 
and is now employed by the llowkcr 
fertilizer company in correspond- 
ence work. He is the same old 
"Tim," as enthusiastic as ever for 
•Aggie." 

•82.— President W. F. Stone of 
Purdue university is president of the 
American association of agricultural 
colleges and experiment stations 
which holds its twenty-sixth annual 
meeting at Atlanta, Oa., on N<>\. 
l.'lth, 1 t th and l'.th. 

'82. — John F. Wilder has received 
unanimous nomination as president 
of the national association of tan- 
ners for the ensuing year. This as- 
sociation which embraces all the tan- 
ners of the I 'idled States as mein- 
l»ers and all the tanners of Canada 
aa aasociate members, he helped to 
organize during tin- light for free hides 
ill I90il. It has become one of the 
strongest organizations of its kind in 
the country and its existence M 
much to the future of the tanning 
industry. Mr. Wilder has been gen- 
eral secrelarv of the association up 

to the present \eai. 

•M7. — F. H- Fowler, clerk of the 
industrial school foi boys at Shirley, 
visited college a few days ago. 

•or,. — W. C. Tuiiuntt. MW1 engi- 
neer of Fasthampton, has been en- 
gaged for some time in drawing a set 
Of plans for a sewerage system to 
cover the entire town. 

•Ofi.— II. M. Husscll who has until 
recently been at Kiverhead. N. Y., is 
now at Washington for the winter. 

•oh.— William F. Sawyer waa mar- 
ried to Miss Grace Fleanor HwtM 
of Sharon on Oct. 12th. 

•OH.— P. W. Farrar is at present 
on the Keokak-St. I/>uis transmission 
line, with the Stone and Webster 
engineering company. His perma- 
nent address is Springliield. 

'11.— Henry H. Morse, who has 
been head of the science department 
of Procter academy, Andover, N. H., 
since graduation, has recently come 
back to college to resume his work 
as a graduate student in entomology. 

'II.— Lomas O. Stevenson has 
accepted a position with the Wilcox 
fertilizer company of Mystic, Conn, 
as travelling salesman. 

1<I11 — Once again. — Second issue 
of the class letter will soon Iks out. 
The Ml men are scattered far and 
wide and every letter will be worth 
reading. Send in your little note at 

once. 

I,. M. Johnson, 
Claas Secretary. 



Tf*JtERS 
XI a x H|llS 



MILUtt 



(\\m Vaiis'^ 



MTAfiUE 



SOUTH 



LSUG4A 
1 LOU 



... \ 



DILttniLDt J? \ * KT. 

T /Liffcfc! ' 

V/l m \ ' i 



WMATU.Y1 



i9tIM1 



HAT 

laurel] 

MRJK 






Ar.MMSU 



H0RTHAMPT0M 



J 



NT. 



% w/ 



MASSACHUSETTS NORTHERN RAIiWAY 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 



CAR A GOWNS 



To the American Collrgesfrom the At- 
lantic to the Pacihc. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



»7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Ootid only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Toefil Mientka . 

Shoes SHined and Poiisnea 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open 8nn«l«y Mavlw St. 

On way to Post Office. 






n 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12,191a 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



rORTYSIXTH YEAR 

Opened September 11, 1912, with an enrollment 
of regular students exceeding 525. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lentes ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String 

AMIIKKVI, MASH. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone $o-, 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



DRUG STORE 



Jtaaralvoras*. frtrmmm. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 
Shins, - • - io 15c 

Collars, - • - • J i-ac 

Cuffs, - - - - iijc 

Plain wash, - - 48c per iloz. 

Same, rough dry, - • 30c per doz, 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, Si. 50 a Suit 

Kai.i-h J. Bohosn, Agent, 7 North Cottage 
Ki.wari. C. Ekwaiujs, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



For a catalog of complete information, address 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Liuhts, &c. 
t Clifton Ave.. AMHKRST. MAS 1 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Semite, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

SUK'k bridge Club, 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CI K RAN & DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. I>. (iriggs, 1'iesident 

J. W. Covill, Manager 

L. Edgar Smith, Manager 

K. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, Manager 

C. Hoke 1 11 nd. Manager 

J. W. T. Insure, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

J. 1). French. Manager 

O. (i. Anderson, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

L. (J. Davies, President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. McDougall, President 



WriUlit vV JDitssoii 

Catalogue* of 

Infill 6* Winter Qooda 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Co 
Students and Athletes who want the te«l. supeix r 
aittclesfor the various tpotts should insist spoa 
those hearing the Wright & Ditson Tr*de Mark 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




5kat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



WriRht 1 Ditson Good* ere the Mandar. 
all sports 
\v,<n;ui' 6m DITSOX 
U4 Wellington St., Boston, N 



If hen Fitting Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



for 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

om. U. «i Mrvlce, B*»t Work, Lowe»l t*. • •• 

All work carefully done. Work called 1st 
delivered. Grnts' overcoats, suits, pant* and 
coats. Ladies' fine linen suit* a specialty. 

Team* will call every day at M. A. C. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. J41 



CARS 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigar* Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock EVERY night 

Corner Amity and Pleaaant Mrwit 



If yon want to be 

MM.1U WITH THK OIKXH 

you muit have your clothe* pre*i>e<l and cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 

II Amity M. 



Maroon Store 



Preening an.l Cleaning a ap> clalty 

Most liberal ticket *y*leni In town 
Tel. mill 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOI.- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 11 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at ReaaenaMe Rate* 



AMHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowie- 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATE 

The Republican gives the best repo I of 
Agricultural College and Amhet 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Dmiiy, $8. Sunday, %». Week. \t- 



THE COLLEGE 




r.rpr 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XX11I. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 19, 19 » 2 - 



No. 



HOCKEY COACH SECURED 



R17PITAT tat nit""" 




NNER 



Enthusiasm 
ass Men. 

lid its ban- 
ill Boring- 
It *raa 
Ambers, ol 

ll ill I'Vl'IA 

u- evening 

k, 1). .1. 
.truclor K. 
,. S. Dra- 

l.ll.rll II 

class, was 
ittee < "ii 
1:111. KW. 
'lark, mill 
eontiibii- 
llatlicld, 

lag **Ag- 

M of Old 



s 

gue wa- 

\ --.111- 
his siib- 

aav<- < \ 
»»iii the 

1 -••! I t III \ 



■■r> 



UjIM "'" ,M 



t. hockey association schedule. 
r\ hen that is announced, dates will be 
settled upon with Vale, Dai tmoiith. 
If, 1. T. and Cornell, members of the 
riation. (.allies are also being 
1 ranged for with the fast llostoii A. 
\.. the ( milH A. A. of New York 
ind manager Little is trying for a 
une with the Pilgrim A. C. of lios- 
11. Holy Cross will probably be 
Mother new opponent ; while Tiin- 
will be dropped from the 
hi'dule. 



which was a penalty 00*1 in the 
MOOBd half. 

LADIES OF FACULTY TO EN 
TERTAIN. 

The ladies of the faculty will en- 
tertain the students in the drill hall 
Saturday ev.-ning November tSfd at 
7-:j(). This is an annual affair at 
whieh time the faculty ladies provide 
an evening's entertainment for the 
college men; it is informal and all 
students are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



us a mi 
iiorv 

iltcmpt 

liiiHiila. 

turned 

11 - with 

Vipo- 

«e - 

• insti- 
>tes, 
I in an 
.nit of 
be ae- 
d and 
1 four 
11 trv- 
r* -he 
•r for 
t lia- 

jland. 

<;.-.- 

•etlilv 
( .| | 
ill of 

. Bng- 

land possessing territory reef* ■ lively 
in Northern Africa . jKiiglsuid indihrsil- 
tar, KgVpt and India does not take 
the part of conquerors but rather that 
of peace makers. Finally we come b> 
the present time when the Balkan 
states, roused by a desire to gain 
their independence from tin domin- 
ating hand of the duel Sultan, have 
united to drive the Turks out of 
Europe and to seize any territory 
that may come into their hands, 
thereby intending to strengthen their 
diminutive dominions. 



SPRINGFIELD'S GAME 

Outplay and Outweigh their Opponents 
and Win 41-0. 



|',,r the f tli time in as many 

VCSttaV, pftMSnhlatfrttl went down 
before the superior play of her old 
rivals from the Springfield Yowflaf 

Hen'l (liristiana-^oriation college ill 
a rather one-sided game on l'ratt 
field. Springfield, Saturday afternoon 
|, v | wore of II to 0. It was the 
deciding game of the series and when 

it syae «U over, Springfield had broken 

the tie and chalked up nine victoi 
for themselves against etgfcl lot at* 
•■ iggiee." 

The game Ml hard fought through- 
out. Springfield presented a much 

heavier beefcJeW ami ■ line that 

|„. ( | litth-less. The loss of Cup- 

tain BtJM 'he "Aggie" leader 

made a vacancy in the line that was 
hard to fill. Samson was able to 
play less than a minute because of 
the injury to his shoulder received in 
the New Hampshire gMM the week 

before. Cwrea, n*» took his ak 

»t Ihe start of the game, put up I 
pluck v fight but he syea handicapped 
by his lack of v* eight in facing a MM* 
heavier opponent. 

l.alan- e,l team that worked more like 
a ma. him- than anything else. The 
interference given I he runner by the 
,,,,,,.„„. „l- was nearly perfc. t 

fbere i k>ea ■ time when the 

^pHofAeki man who w m-: the 

ball did not ha\e three or four men 
ti:.\clling on in front of him, and 
,,,,..i.tly many long gains w 

made. 

( In the otlni hand tl M issachll- 

I MM la.ked the team play and 

Meed that had heretofore chai M -t< I 

i/ed then playing. I'ln team showed 

power on the 0fT.11>. at the start but 

M.mn and K el ley started 



mining back punts the weakness of 
1 1|,- defense became evident. Tm 
"Aggies" ta.kled hard but not sm. 

Dm heavy tratateg seisool backs 

tdi.x.k them Of npt^atedly. m vend 
times going through practi.ally the 
«hole team before OOTS <lio\e the 
runners to the sidelines. 

The ball was generally in Massa- 

eta»e4te territory ead the team eotv 

tinuallyon thedefen- . Mann easily 
outilistanced Smith and KMridge in 
the ki.king and this advantage had 
its effect. Only in the first period 
,lid the "Aggiee* show their real 
Htretigth. Then the Springfield men 
unloaded several brilliant forwai-l 
Ml with more than the usual MO* 
and a touchdown resulted. 
From then on Massachusetts fought 
,|. -perately to prevent further gam- 
but the opposing runners were too 









T.TTVRA KV ->f t' 






The College Signal, Tuesday, November 12, 19" 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIOr" 

At Half-pri 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



E. E. MILLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jbwklky 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String 

\MHKKnT, ma»». 
Next to Post Office. 



rORTYSIXTM YEAR 



•4 



DRUG STC 



A.ant-»«»r*t, Mm 



AM HERS 

Co-op Laui 

High-Grade College 
LAUNDRY 

Shirts, 

(oil. IIS. • 

Cuff*, - 
Flam wash, 
Same, rough dry, 

DRY CLEANING AND P 

Steam Pressing, 50c a 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, 



Kw.ru J. ItoHtiRN, Agtnt, 7 No 
KhWAKii C Ei>wari 

Put full name and address < 



AMHERST BOOK 5 



Loose • Leaf Note B< 
Fountain Pen 

Before buying elsewhere, se« 
ment of pennants and I 

CURRAN & DYEK, Props 



FLORICULTU 
DEPARTMEI 



Buy your flowers of 
tural department. The 
houses are now producinj 
material and we have exc 
carnations.violets and chy. 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



one jo— 4 



Co. 



5. 



MAS' 



tasoii 
oocIm 

1. ColU^e 
<l, aupeiii r 
insist up. n 
rude Mark. 

fgShoes 
•aters 
«y» 
Forms 
sll sports 

tandard Im 

-i« >V 

iston, M 



OR 



RING. 

went film 

llrd It 

, pants and 

:ialty. 

I. A.C. 

Prop. 

rti n«. >« 



for HOI 



HIE COL- 
past each 

RatM 



T. R CO 



INFLUENCE 



1 Bowle« 



Ul > ili-urx/ , 'v 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. TJ>e un| - 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Springfield Republican 



of 



A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCAT1 

The Republican gives the best repor 
Agricultural College and Amhers 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 



Dmiiy, $*. Sunday, %». Wtekl) V- 



THE COLLEGE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 




Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 19, 19' 2 - 



No. io 



HOCKEY COACH SECURED 

Fred H. Broder of Ontario to Work 
with Team After Christmas. 



RECITAL IN CHAPEL 



SOPHOMORE DINNER 



Through the efforts of Profeeaor 
licLeiee, Mr. Red EL P rode r, of 

Morrisburg, Ontario, haH beta 
secured as coach. Mr. Broder will 
be here for two weeks immediately 
following the ( In istmas vacation, ami 
will spend much of his time in 
developing the second team. More 
attention will be devoted to the second 
team this year than ever before, a 
complete schedule of games being 
expWlei. The »tyle of playing will 
be somewhat Modified this year. 
The American method, heretofore 
I exclusively will be combined 
with the Canadian style, to increase 
team work efficiency. 

With the football season over, the 
attention of the college will now be 
eeattnd for several months upon the 
work of the hookey team. A squad 
of 40 men, mostly freshmen. has 
re p o rte d to Manager Little, who has 
In en developing their wind by means 
of 1 pi act ice. During the last 

,i, days, indoor work has bee. car- 
i on, consisting largely of ike fit 
ing, breaking in goal leaden, and 
obtaining impressions of the new men. 
I- our memliers of last years' fast tram 
have reported for work: Little" lo and 
• ipt Hutchinson,.Ion«-sand Needham 
M I , but the presence of such a large 
nad working out means that but 
v «an be sure of their positions. 
. most vital place to be filled is 
.t of goal-tender, and tin- team is to 
tt the assistance of Ackerman '12, 
m k varsity goal-tender for the last 
re vears, in coaching the ten or 
.he mm now out for that position. 
The skating rink will be in< 
in size this year to 160 long by N 
i i.le. The plans of the Lighting 
apparatus for the rink are already in 
the hinds of the electric light men at 
the College station, and it may go up 
at any time now. A new style uni- 
form is being provided, entirely of 

n, no letters or stripes l>eing 

shown. The 'toque, however, re- 
us the same as last year. 
The sehedeule is still being held up 
pending the outcome of the intercol- 
-giate hockey association schedule 



Schubert String Qu.rtet Gives Well Held st Springfield. Much Enthusiasm 
Balanced Program. Displayed by the Odd Class Men. 
The lirst musical concert of the; The sophomore class held its ban- 
ner took plare last Wednesday qt.ct in OooUy'i Hotel, in Sprmg- 
cvening in the chapel, when the Held. Saturday evening. It 
Schubert string quartet of Boston attended hy sixty-four membra -.1 
n Tfl a most enjoyable Ita ri f ft the class and was successful ... ev c,> 
entertainment. The work of this way. The speakers of the evening 



rombinatiou has been excellent for 
the last few vears and they have 



were l'rofessoi Ilasbroiiek. D. J. 
Lewis S. .1. Tike. Jr., Instructor 1.. 



earned a reputation which arouses L. IJuaife. II. G Little. K. S. I>ra 

1 If i I L. .,li>,.f I I . . i' I ,, - r 1 I 



interest wherever they are see... 
Frederick Blair, cellist and manager, 
is known N many in this s eetton 



psj and II. C Darling. Herbert II. 
lubald. [uesident of thecla — . BJ*f 
toastmaster. and the committee con- 



Mner he was.for a few years, tearl.er sistedof .1. A I'inrr. chairman. I- .\\ 



— 

5 



X / 



of violimello at Smith eollege 

The program, the one usually ren- 
dered at collegiate recitals, W:is 

Quartet -1$ flat major, 

Ueelhovcn Op. 18, No. 6 

Violin Solo Kapsodiapiemontrse. 

Siningagna 

a Interludium from Quatuor Slave, 

Gleaoeoo* 

b Spinning Song. Hollander 

Violincello SetO— Etegle, Arrnsky 1 

iei K major, Haydn Op. 77- N " ■ 

The personnel of the quartet wa« 

Davol banders, first violin ; Martin 

( ounrll. srrol.d VUmll j Clarence 

.|,„dan. viola: ami Frederick Blair, 
violim-ll. The first ami last named 

rmdered ic4oi which wen- rery dell- 
. and their themes suggested 
brightness and charm. The whole 
program was of a light nature rather \ was at 
than profound, and "as daeatj 
appreciated by the amlieuce. 



Knell. D. II. Cauda, 8. D. Clerk, and 

M V< IwUl. Music was contribu- 
ted by Draper, Tear* and Hatfield, 

and the class joined it. singing ■ 
gh r, My Aggie" and "S<.ns of < M.l 
-'.■hi. setts " 



ASSEMBLY ADDRESS 

1'lofrssoi Bobr.t .1 . Sp.a^llr VM 

thespeakei at the Wednesday Assem- 

biy. Dr. Bpragae took for his sub 

jeet " The conditions which h:i\- 

l in Beaten Barope ftwa tin' 

brizinning of the sixteenth crtitui\ 
Up to 0M presr.it dav." 

Russia iron, l.er beginni.iji as a na- 
tion, sought to extend bet territory 
khm meoiet lb. li.st Bttampi 

indinaviai. peninsula. 



SOCCER GAME 

Saturday morning the soccer foot- 
ball team went to Springfield and 
was beaten by the training •oho©! 
n.l team, .'» to 0. The M. A. C 
team was really the freshman team 
with the exreptioti of Draper. The 
training school scrubs showed better 
■paed and form, and had everything 
their own way. Twice, however. M. 
A. C almost got thioiigl. their goal. 
ami mad.- them hustle to prevent a 

score. 

The training school won the toss 
up and had a gnat advantage in the 
lirst half, scoring one goal within 
three minutes and two others before 
changing sides. Three penalty kicks 
were given to Springfield one of 
which was a penalty goal in the 



SPRINGFIELD'S GAME 

Outplay and Outweigh their Opponents 
and Win 41-0. 



I'oi the fourth time in us many 

veara, llaeeaehaeetti weal down 
before the superior play of her old 
rivals fro... the Springfield Young 
Men's Christian association college in 
I rather one-sided game 011 I'ratt 
ticld, Spiin-ticld. Saturday afternoon 
by a eaofeof II to " I' W! '* *■ 
deciding game of the series and when 
it was all over. Spi iugtield had broken 
the tic and chalked up nine v.cto; 
|,„ themselves against eight for the 

■'iieS." 
The game was hard r.uiglit through- 
out. Springlield pr.-ntrd a much 
heavier ba.klield and a line that 
bed little less. The loss of Cap- 
tain Samson, the -Aggie" lead., 
,„ade a xacancv in the line that I 
h:lI ,| ,,, Bll Samson was able to 
!,la\ leaf than a minutr because of 
the injury b. his shoulder rec.-ived in 
the New llamp-dii.e |aJM the W* 
( .11. an, who took his plar. 

it the start of the geast, pal •* ■ 

plucks light but be aee he rwrlnep ped 

by his lark of Wright il, faring ■ UlUch 

heavier opponent. 

TheSprini ' ■ w,n 

balan. rd tram that VOrfced more like 
a ma<hine than anything else. Th' 

interie.cn. .• ghrea the raaae* '-y «•"■ 
oppoaeati tree eeertj |..rfct. 
There eae seldom i ti ahea the 

>pi iugtield man who « ing the 

ball did not have three or four men 



but being repulsed here, she turned 

tonew fields of eoaaaeat WTerewlth 

Turkev and <.....<•. and tin- rtepQ 

leouic invasion followed in close sir 

, .1 • ,• tr'tvclliuil on in tioiit oi nun. mm 
ceesiou. In 1x74, through the insti- |t.n%ciin*^ ^^ ^ mmtmmmmmm 



A ban that is announce.l, dates will be | ■ ect 



rod half. 



tiled upon with Yale, Da. tmouth, , LA dies OF FACULTY TO EN- 

M. I. T. and Cornell, members of the 

.iation. (iames are also being 

iiged for with the fast Boston A. 

\.. the Crescent A. A. of New York 

n.l manager Little is trying for a ?; 



gation of Russia, the Balkan wUtMi 
controlled b\ Turkey, united in an 
endeavor to drhe the Turks out of 
Kurope. Before this could hi 
complishcd, Kngland interfered and 
the war came to an end. r'o. four 
hundred years. Russia has been try- 
ing to acquire territory whereby eht 
might ha\e access to the water for 
I,,,, , <( |„meice and navy, but has 
b. en constantly repulse.l by Kngland. 
During all this time, Austria. Oer- 
many and Italy have been greedily 
watching, as a cat watches for a 
mouse, to swallow up any or all of 
the Balkan stato. I ranee and Kng- 
land possessing territory respectively 
in Northern Africa ;Kngland intiibral- 
tar. BgTpt ami India doCB not take 
the part of conquerors but rather that 
of peace makers. Kiually we come to 

the present ti when the Balkan 

states, roused by a desire to gain 
their independence from the dotnin- 



itne with the Pilgrim A.C of Bos 
il Holy Cross will probably be 



TERTAIN. 

The ladies of the faculty will eli- 
te, tain the students in the drill hall 

Saturday evening November fM •Jl^^ &&<* *• cmel Sultan, have 
i, an annual affair at ^.^ ^ ^ ^ Tmk8 ()(lt of 
which time the faculty lad.es provide ^^ ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ten . itorv 
an evening's entertainment for the ^J intr> |krff hall(ls< 



come into their han«ls. 



OOeeeqaeOtly many long gains wen 

made. 

On the othei hand the Massaehu- 
Mtb] men lacked the team play and 

i that bad heretofore cha.a.te, 
,/edth.i, pla.Ml.g. 11" t'-am showed 
. , M ,| H . offense at the start but 
.,„,nas Mann and Kdley started 
nin „ing back punts the weak... - 
|hj defense became evident. Tfc 
"Aggies" tackled hard but not sine 

The heavy iraiaiag lehool haeha 

thooh th.H. oi repeatedly, aeearal 

tfeiei goiag through practically the 

sfhote tra... befon i|l " N '' ,l "' 

runners to the ^ideli.i. 

The ball was generally in Massa- 
chusett- b i.ilo.N and the team con- 
tinually on the defense. Mann easily 
ollf( |istanced Smith and Kldridge in 
the kicking and this advantage had 

its effect. Only in the bet period 

oMd the --Aggies" show their real 
strength. The., the Springfield men 
BOloeded several brilliant forward 
aaaaM atta arore than the usual suc- 
cess and a touchdown resulted. 
From then on Massachusetts fought 



'"• " W J ~' — r . .. * . an evenings c.«^.^ ~»- . . f , H , , nlo t Ue ir nanus, -— . 

nother new opponent; while Trm- ; men . |t is illfonnil l and all ^ » ^ th „ ir desperately to prevent furU.c ,., , 

will be dropped from the * ^ cordially invited to at- { »» ' > "\, * but the oppoeiag runners we.c too 



rill 
hedole 



diminutive dominions. 



I 









The College Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 191 2. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 191a. 






well protectt:<l. 

Springfield gained 189 yards in 
line-rushing :m<l 125 yards by tot- 
irard jcihsi-h. Mann's kicks totalled 
.IT."* yards while ; '>-"> yards were lost OS 
atteaptad rash** ami 70 yards <>n 

penalties. If. A. C. made l'»0 yards 
on line-inshing and In'.i yards resulted 
from kicking. Three forward ps 

added ^9 yards. Springfield ■seared 
11 first downs to six for Massachu- 
setts* 

The attendants was the largest 
SaSS on Pratt Held this season, about 

500U beings conservative estimate, 
jfasssnhneotti men Inclndlng faculty 

ineinliers, alumni and the nnilergrad- 

uate body occupied the east stands 
and cheered the team throughout the 

OOnfeSSt* Ki\e hundred Of the stu- 
dents oeBM down from Amherst on a 

special train Saturday noon and, 

headed l>\ theS.-eond Regiment band 

of Springfield, mar c h ed to th. Held. 

Between the quarters, college songs 
were BSSg and after the game the 
students remained in the -Kinds and 

sang the college soon; and ohearad the 

team as it h-t'l the field. 

In Uki- manner the return to the 
city was made ami. marching to the 
( ....lev SOtd when- the team wus 

quarter* L, each member of the agaad 

was cheered ami once more the col- 
lege song «as snug. The special 

train left Springfield at 11-80 after 
tic- theatres and arrived in Ami. 
shortly after midnight. 

The game in detail : 

dipt. kellc\ won the toss for 
Springfield and ohose todsfsndths 

neith goal with the wind blowing 

strongly from that direction. Smith 

kicked off but attei ihiee tries at the 
line .Mann WM forced to punt. The 
•• Sfgftss ttied the kicking gattM and 
.Smith bOOtsd a short OSM to Horne. 
Two line plays failed to gain and 

then Lorans went through for fifteen 

yards but diopped the ball. Baker 
recovering foi .M. A. ' . Brewer ami 
Smith each made short gains and 
(.rases want through for fust down. 
After two tries at the line. Smith 
posted to Kelley who ran the ball 
k 23 yard- Let',. re being brought 

down. The fits! forward pans of the 

game was then worked, Mann to 
Briggs, bringing the ball to the SSVCn 
yard line. The -Aggie" line threw 
back their opponents three times but 
on the last down (apt. Kelhy skirted 
right end foi the fust score. Maun 
kicked the goal. 

Smith kicked off to Mann who ran 
I t yards before being Stopped by 

Gore. A steady march to the goal 

followed but Massachusetts held on 
her own eight yard line. Brewer, 
Graves and Smith each took a turn at 
carrying the ball netting 1 "_' yards but 
time was called. 

The first play in the second period 
failed to gain so Smith prated and 
Maun ran the ball back to the '■>■> yard 
line. Here a penalty and a forward 
pass cancelled each other bat Ueghold 
went around left end for 27 yards. 
With the ball on the eight yard line 



the "Aggie" again held and Mann 
tried a place kick. It fell short and 
Smith immediately punted out <>f 
danger. Mann, however, ran the 
kick back to the 1 5 yard line before 
he was brought down. Home was 
thrown for a loss by O'Brien and 
Springfield was penalised for holding. 
Mann tried another place kick. The 
ball bounded along the ground and 
Gore fumbled it. Briggs picked it 
up and went over the line for the 
second touchdown. Mann kicked the 
goal. 

Smith kicked off again and by con- 
sistent rttShCS the ball WSS again 
brought to the 88 yard line before 
the "Aggie" defense braced. ( )ncc 
more Mann attempted a place kick, 
thi* time the ball going outside. 
Smith posted to Mann, who, shied 
by perfect interference ran 50 yards 
through the entire Massachusetts 
team for another score. Home 
kicked the goal. Mann kicked off 
but time was -<>on called. 

Two mote scores w.re made by 
Springfield in the third period. Briggs 
kicked off and O'Brien ran the ball 
back to midlield. There was no gain 
in two rushes s.. Smith attempted a 
forward pass which Briggs inter- 
cepted. The -Aggie" line held so 
Mann sent a forward pass to Briggs 
Who was downed on Mas-aehu-.tts 
It-yard line. Kelley bucked the line 
(Of two yards and then Mann circled 
the end for a touchdown. He kicked 
the goal. 

Briggs kicked to fiorc nnd a min- 
ute later intercepted another forward 
Massachusetts held SSd Mann 
waS forced to pSSt, Smith returned 
the kick after an unsuccessful at- 
tempt to gain through tackle. The 
home team once more begun a march 
to the goal line.Beghold carrying the 
ball over after a plunge through 
tackle. Mann again kicked the goal. 
The ball was in possession of tha 
••Aggies" when the quarter ended on 
their own 12-yard line. 

After a two minute interval play 
was resumed. GotS and Nis-.n 
made 12 yards in two rushes but there 
was holding and M. A. C. was pen- 
alized Ifi yards. Kldridge punted to 
Mann who was downed in his tracks 
by Huntington. A forward pass, 
Kelley to Briggs. brought the ball to 
Massachusetts' 20 yard line. Bhotl 
gains by Home finally put the ball 
OVaf. He failed to kick the goal. 

This ended the scoring. Both 
teams had substituted freely and the 
remainder of the game was closely 
contested. Loreiiz was barred from 
the game for roughing the fullback 
when he landed hard against Kld- 
ridge after the latter had got off a 
punt, his team being penalized half 
the distance to the goal line of 40 
raids. When time was called the 
the ball was in the possession of the 
of the "Aggies" on the 50 yard 
line. 

The line-up : 

*, M. C. A. COLLEGE. " AfiOIK ". 

Hell, Coffin, le re, Melican, Huntington 
I.orenz, Shea, It 

it, baker, Samson, Wood 



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Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.'. 



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House Next to Laundry. 



Fall & winter Soils 4 Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order & Ready to Wear Suits 

Latest Styles 
inMackmaws 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DBNTAL ROOM* 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Own Hours: 
BtolBA.M. LHOtonP.M. 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mass. 

H. B. WHITE 'If, Agent 

10 Allen Street 



STYLISH 
STATIONERY 



Style as well as Quality are Marked 
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Handsome writing papers in different tint and fabric effects. 

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LUNCHiON 
AFTERNOON TEA 

Dinner if arranged for. 



Hoardman, lg rg, Griftn 

liriggs, c c - Do,e 

McLean, Mall, rg lg, Elsenhaure 

Friedland, rt It, Curran, l'laisted 

l)ickens,t<- le, Kdgei ton.lMaisted.O'Brien 
Mann, Kelly, qb <|t>, <,ore, Melican 

Kelly, Fountain, lh!> ihb. Smith, Eldridge 
Horne, rhb Ihb, Hrewer, Huntington 

Beghold, C.ibson, lb fb, Graves, Nissen 
Score- V. M. C. A. College 41, "Aggie" 
Touchdowns— Kelley, Briggs. Mann 
2, Beghold, Home. Coals from touch 
downs— Manns. Umpire— Jones of Hav- 
erford. Linesman— Chapman of M. A.C. 
Time— 15-minute periods. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction fiuaianteed 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
w.th a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 

E WELL'S 



ST0CKBRIDGE CLUB. 

The regular meeting <>f the Stork- 
bridge elub was held in French hall 
last Monday evening, «ktS 1 large 
gathering turned out tola ar I Itsftop 
ticon lecture given by A.T.I.utgie ivj- 

■tattvt of slsffeesU eessfssy. 

Ha g*Tf ■ history of salt from the 
time when it was first known, and then 
:in account of its present manufac- 
ture. Be had with him varioun sam- 
ples of salt showing the .lilT.r.i.t 

|i like, and ttnaHtiei that nets riassm 

explained in detail the methods em- 
ployed by the plant of his company. 

DRESSING THE ROISTER 
DOISTERS 

The Hoister DoaStftTC SSfS meas- 
ured for their costumes Wednesday 
evening by a costume maker of 
Haverhill. The costumes will to 
all indications be well made and true 
|0 the part. 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACK1NAWS 








1 / 




The Fall leasoti is the Sweater tfmeol the sear The Football 
garnet call for Mackinaw tad Sweaters. We wn showing the 

best stvl«-s of tfl€ Inst makrrs. No lancy prices in this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50. $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 




We are all straining 
our eyes to see what 
the coming years have 
in store for us. 

Alright! But in 
looking forward let 
us not forget the 
blessings that are 
ours today. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

Tiie REXAIyL, Store o«m tt*€» oower 





Past, Present and 
Future are rose-hued 
when you view them 
through fragrant Vel- 
vet smoke. Its flavor 
never ceases to please; 
its smoothness always 
satisfies. 



Kfasxttfa^fo 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Scbool ana College Photographers . . • 




/n c4//y. c a Center St. Northampton Mass., 
L.OCAL.L-T. 5 and South Had i eyi Mass. 

I The*e Studios offer the 1*»t skilled 
Ma.n Osncss 4rmts ,„„, ,„,.!,,* 

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In so far as nur benefit mutual. 

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Everything Electrical 



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I sl 









• 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 1911- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

K . 1 1 . V A N / . \V A I . K N It V B (i ' i J, Kditor I n-Chief 
CHESTER B.WHRBLBR 'itMaaactocEdftor 
OSCAR O. ANDERSON 'n. AMiatent BdHoi 
FRF.DKKK'K D. GRIGGS 'ij. Athletic Bdltoi 
s. MILLER JOKMAN'ij. Athletic Editor 
HARRY W. \l I IN' '13. Alumni Bdltoi 

STUART B. POSTER 'u. ' "»i'» s Editor 

IKVINK K. PARKER '14 
HAROLD C SLACK *u, 
J. ALBEKT PRICE 'if, 
GEORGK B. DOHNEI I 'i?. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

OEOROE ZABRISKIB J<i.'i3. Bus. Manager 
F K N F.ST S, CLARK. IB .'u. Asst Hus Manager 
ERNEST P.UPTON'M, Asst. Adv .Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH *l|, Circulation 



Alumni Kiiitor 
Department Editor 

Associate Editor 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
theSi<;NAL Office or handed to Stuart B. Foster 
14, on or before Saturday preceedinj; each issue. 1 

Nov . II , C-4. r ) P. m— M. A. C. Chris- 
tian association in chapel. 
Nov. _M. '.Mo a. M. — Sunday chapel. 

Rev. Pad Van Dyke of 

Princeton. N. J. 

Nov. •-'*'>. 7-oo i>. m . Bt o ck brtdgo 

club, Room G, South College. 



Subscription $1 50 per vear Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd 

Entered is •econd-c'isi miner it tha Amhrrw 
Pwt Office 

Vol. XXIII. TRKSBAV, Nov. 19. No. 10 



TnF. football ■eaaoa is past. In 
spite of tin- result of Saturday the 
college can still say that this ycai'- 
team is the strongest of the last four 
BBBBons. In meeting Springfield it 
came up against the greatest BJ oring 
machitie that the training school has 
ever turned out. 

In no way has Coach ltrides' first 
season here been a failure. Not 
winning the "big" game was a keen 
disappointment hut it is not | meas- 
ure of the team's work during the 
past season. The fcf. A. C. team 
this year, except in a few games, has 
shown more real foothall than it has 
shown for some years. Football 
cannot he learned in one season ; the 
team has taken its first work in the 

nee of the game ami next 
with many veteran- <-u hand it can 
take up its gridiron lessons where it 
dropped them this year, gaining in 
experience :i nd ability and, wc hope, 
making I record which will he more 
to the liking of the team'!* supporters. 
The roach has made an excellent 
start for the first season and deserves 
considerably more credit than the 
bald records would show. 

There is no virtue in crying over 
what can BO lOBflOf be helped, bnt if 
next year the same disgraceful show- 
ing is made by the students on the 
practice field, the undergraduates, at 
least, will deserve a losing team. 
At the beginning of the lOOBOH the 
coach made a plea for practice 
material which was only temporarily 
and half-heartedly heeded. The 
team must have scrubs to practice 
against and if there is no other way 
to get out I second and even third 
eleven, practice with the varsity 
should be made compulsory for 
underclassmen who would win their 
numerals on the gridiron. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Nothing short of two hockey and 
two baseball victories will soothe our 

feelings now. 

Special trains may have their 
advantages, but speed is nearly a 
minus quantity. 

The athletic council met in the 
Cooley after the game and awarded 
the coveted letters. 

Without casting any reflections on 
our own band, let it be said that 
their absence was not noticed. 

The hockey squad does not believe 
in procrastination. A scrimmage was 
held in the Drill hall Saturday morn- 
ing. 

Hash-house once more to our sur- 
prise and delight. Woo for the good 
old data of soup showers and bread 



these sweaters will be 



and to 

awarded. 

Even though Jupiter Pluvius 
swelled the pond to the utmost 
capacity, the sophomores decided 
last Thursday that it woidd probably 
stand a little higher level ami so ten 
of the newly-smokers provided an 
aquatic entertainment for a few mo- 
ments at the upper end of the pond. 

It is not often that we receive edi- 
torial bouquets, but the Sunday 
l',,ion commented very favorably. 
To quote : "It needed just a glance 
at this splendid body of young men 
to impress one with the fact that the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
is attracting as fine a grade of boys 
as any of the strictly cultural insti- 
tutions." 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— OF- 



fights. 

I'.Ul evidently established a custom 
with its sophomore smoker last year. 
It's a good thing both for the class 
and the college. 

ljuitc a number of the younger 
alumni were at the game Twelve 
ami eleven had good sized detflfB- 
tions. The faculty, too, were \erv 
much in evidence. 

Beaten we were but not in spirit. 
That sample of college spirit dis- 
played last Saturday was of the kind 
that make- college life worth while. 

The freshman class held a meeting 
Wednesday and decided to give every 
man his numerals who played in the 
Sophomore game. In addition a 
committee was appointed to pick 0S)t 
the most deserving men on the team 



•07. _C. B. Thompson arrived in 
BOSBBB Nov. 1th. thus completing a 
tour around the world which began in 
1!»07 when he left to take up teaching 
in Hawaii. He will return in March 
to the Federated Malay States where 
he is in charge of a large rubber plant- 
ation. He spent a few days aliout 
college last week. 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MOUKRN REPAIRING DEFT, 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Academy 
Music. 



NORTH [UPTON 2 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER II 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY TONIC 



Eldridge '14 



Kendall '16 



Henrietta Croaaman * tircateat Succasa 



«* 



SHAM " 



EVERY NIGHT 

Prices 25c, 50c and 75c 



MATINEE WED. AND SAT. 

Prices 25c and 50c 



Reserved for 



HOTEL COOLEY 



Springfield. 



*zar & c 



NOTICE 

There will be I meeting of the 
Suivw. board in the Sk.nai. ollice 
Thursday evening at t5-lf>. 




10 



7? — io 2? j5 if +0 i? fi «? #° *? 3« *r %* TF~ 10 

mMCMSHK BALL KlCk~~~- FqRWARP PAX 



o s 

• Y'H.c'h. "causae ball 



"RUSH 

PENALTY XKtXtXMKX* 

CHART OF SPRINGFIELD GAME 



FUHBi.tr mmunpnimnMIIMH 



FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

Erratic is perhaps the best charac- 
terization that can be applied to 
I Hi 2 football season at M. A. C. 
lirilliant playing such as that in the 
I'nion and Holy (rows games has 
alternated with ragged wink that lias 
indicated a complete reveisal of 
11. Perhaps the best answer to 
the puzzle lies in the playing of many 
of the college teams. e\cn at the 
larger institutions where there has 
B material in abundance ; without 
ilivnie Of reason apparent to the 
dopestera," they have showed the 
-ime reversals of form. 

There in one reason at M. A. < '.. 
however, that has had something to 
do with the results. Despite the 
urging of Coach lb ides there lia- 
11 a shortage of men all season 
for use on the scrub* and I he varsity 
ban suffered consequently. 

Tl "ii opened with the fast 

Rhode Island state team on the 
mipiis and Cobb's men took the 
£:ime by a score of 7-o. The 
need of much hauler practise 
evident in the playing of the 
Aggie team. A week later at 
JlImiOOtBdjr to the surprise of all, 
the men played Innm to | standstill 
in an exciting <».o rontest and were 
onrjf prevented from scoring several 
time- bv fumbles at critical moments. 
Here was evidence of speed and 
■.rMiessivciiess that raised the hopes 
M. A. 0. followers to a dangerous 
pitch. The fall came in the next 
at Hanover. Confident that a 
tit or a low score would ensue, the 
Maroon and White team was defeated 
Announced in the sporting 
. -Minimis its shattered by injuries and 
weakened by lack of material, the 
l.ig Gicii team, one of the bB*4 in 
it vear*. smothered their light 
opponents from the Hay state by 
'.heer weight ami despite the grittiest 
brand of playing, smashed through 
then offense and defense in a way 
that upset the team for almost the 
whole season. Men put on the crip- 
pled list after the Daitmoiitii game 
-till feeling the effects of it. 
lioston college was the next oppo- 
nent and there was little difliciilty in 
bBJ Ihciii bv a CJ-0 score that 
..I very plainly the relative 
ngth of the teams. The less 
about the Vermont game the 
bettor. Resuming football relations 
aftei 1 break of four years, the | 
was given such treatment that it is 
• louhtful if the university of Vermont 
will appear on next year's football 
Bait. A game that by all the 
nil. - should have gone to M. A. C. 
b ■ 7-0 score was handed to \ Yr- 
• bv I !>-7 score. The game was 
protested without result. 

\i Worcester, the team played 

Kintlv and Holv Cross wasbarelv 

to hold to I score of <'.-»',. Roth 

01 the offense and defense Aggie out- 

I the Purple and again the crit- 

<>ked forward hopefully. Refore 

iwd of some 3.*.0 students and 

alumni who followed the team to 



Medford. Tufts by taking advantage 
of uncertain and ragged playing on 
the part of their opponents rolled up 
13 points to nothing for Aggie. 
There was, in this game, hardly a 
trace of the brilliant playing of a 
week before. 

There was little trouble in defeat- 
ing BlOB Hampshire state at Man- 
. hester The (iranite state boys 
ployed f00d football but should not 
have been allowed BVOB the field goal 
put down to their credit. It was 
evident that Massachusetts out- 
classed them throughout the BJBBBt 

The score of the Springfield en- 
counter was 41-n, the largest score 
Over rolled up against Aggie by her 
ancient rival. Tin* puzzle is hard to 
explain, for the students and the 
men <>n the team were confident that 
the battle would result favorably for 
M. A. C. Springfield has a wonder- 
ful team but tl. ie football 
aggregation despite the work of in- 
dividual stars was not the same 0B4 
that fought against 1 nion. Hot) 
Cross or Dartmouth. 

The season shows a total of two 
victories, five defeats anil two ties, 
and judging by this paper record the 
■casou could be called only moder- 
ately successful. Rut there i* some 
thing more to BO said With the 
advent of coach Brides, it would 
00001 that Aggie at last is coming out 
of her recent football slump. The 
1 •■-nits have shown that the team 
spirit is gaining; in place of an 
aggregation of individual players, a 
machine is in BTOOOOO of construction. 
With coach Brides back next 
with material that has already 
received insf ruct ion from him the 
outlook is much brighter than it BOO 
I wen in years past. 



COMMUNICATION 

Eihtoks or The College Siokai. :— 

//.»/• Sir* : 

A few days ago a numlKi of fresh- 
men were publicly disgraced for not 
saluting seniors, — and that was all 
well and proper ; rules must l>« 
enforced. But what punishment is 
meted out to the large number of 
s. niors who do not return the fresh- 
men's salutes? "None, of course," 
you say, "that would be absurd." 
And vet. why deny the freshmen 
the ethical satisfaction of a return 
salute? It takes but little time, and 
not only makes the freshman feel 
better, but increases his respect for 
the senior who thus honors him. 
"i Miirs truly, 

A JuNloi:. 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 

Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, containing the rieju amounts n( 
available nitrogen, in both chemical and OTgOJik bums, with BO ex 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric acid, both for fertilizing and 1 Btolyfr 
ing effects, and the proper amount and light fotm of potash, all thor 
oughly blended together and in forms that will not Cftfco, but remain in 
a drillable condition, and which will act not only in the boglMibg, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based BBOB the needs of ihc nop and 
market requirements), are what the practical fanner should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops. Above all things, he should avoid Bflbol 
anced and improper mixtures that have the deft* t of one element being 
insoluble and another element BM soluble for BUCCeSS»ol plant gTOVth. 



Study tin Plant Food Problem 
— There is some thing in it. — 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



Kuppenhcimers 

Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 





F. A. SHERARD 

MEN'S STORE 





That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a O A K. 

CAMPION, «olo3 A K ent. 






PROFESSOR EVANS IN CHAPEL 

Prof. A. II. Kvans addressed BM 
student t»odv Bl Sunday chapel in 
pluce of Rsibbi Stephen S. Wise of 
New York. Bo emphasized the won- 
derful work that has been done bv a 
small number of men in whom the 
spark of a great principle has been 
kept alive. 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 

-We make them all and make them right at 






ML 

College Store 








The College Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 191a. 






The Folyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jolibers of Wrought Iron and Bras* Pip*, VahWi 

and Pitting* f'" stt-am, Water an«l (Jav Asbestos 
and MaCMSta I! '!«'' :""l I'M'* - Covi-riiiKS, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill £upi'll»». Engirecri and 

Contractors for St>-,in- ,md Hot Wtti lli.itinn 



^ Teachers Exchange 



Of Boston 



120 Boy Itt on St. 



con,"; ; p,^""" kVr * y *V m ' "'moVo'^mm.* Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C&rp^rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Antheist, Mass, 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
( .mis. Kodak work given prompt ami < -.ireful attention. 
Fnlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits Tor the veiy 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



NasH BIocK, Amherst 
H. M ktx.Kks, 1 ;. Agent 

87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 30^-2. 



E. FRANK COE FERTIl IZERS 



1 xrs 



Standard of Excellence for over 50 Years > 



lt»IL> 



QUALITY fssnss ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study Efficiency and Economy in the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quant i 
titles of fertilizer; hut It Does Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount of the Right Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There .s an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER '" meet the requirementi 
of every crop ( >» every kind of soil. < »»r experts (who sre 

practical farmers) will be glad to assist you in making \our selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Yalues than are 
the Host Expert Chemists. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS I his Year 

BewafC Ol those fertilizers whose only commendation is a "cut" in price. 
This is an admission of one of two things — either tiny haw been too 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials. 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station :- " The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends »ot so mm h upon what is paid for it, as upon the 
character of the materials used to make it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty v ears' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be " just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will he 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 



'•QUALITY,, MOTTO OF GLEE 
CLUB 



fruit is of high color ami line texture. 
This all helps to build up the evidence 



, , , that Massachusetts can grow apples 

I hough onlv the second rehearsal . , ; , . 

.,...,'. . , , , not onlv as fine in uualitv, hut also 11. 

with Mr. lSlaml, the rehearsal of the ■ ' , * m , 

• , I appearance, as niav be found an\ 

showed , . . 

when- in the country. 



glee club Wednesday evening 

a marked improvement as the result 

of his training. Mr. island, in his 

heart to heart talks with the glee 
club, made it perfectly plain that the 
Club will have to live up to the col- 
lege motto, "quality," <>r his name 
will not appear in connection with it 
The glee club intends to show this 
quality, and by training, willingness 
to work, and voice, to put this feature 
of the college on a par with the glee 
clubs of the country. 



INDEX NEWS. 

The final proof of the Imb.r has 
been returned to tin- printer this 
wci k. and wink on the printing 
and binding will begin immediate- 
ly. The work of the editors is 
practically linishcd, and the ls>ok 

should appear on the campus before 

many WMfcS have passed. While 
tins rear*S volume must necessarily 

hi somewhat along the lines estab- 
lished by its predoeeeeors, there will 

be, nevertheless, many innovations in 
I great many of its departments. 
Much new ••dope" has been Used to 

till op spaces naased bj the cutting 

out of certain obsolete features of 
other //i'/> m 

Watch OUt for the unparalleled eot- 
lection of photos of all the frolics 
and campus scries of the past 
college year. Here is the golden op- 
portunity foi ever? man to obtain 
tbOSS pbotOS which he would have 
taken if he had possessed a i -an • 
or if he had remembered to bring it 
011 this or. that occasion. 

Again a word to the freshmen ! 
Don't fail to buy a copy of the //«/.. r 
just as soon as it comes out. You 
will regret it more and more as the 
days go by. if you do not have one 
of those ••classy" histories of your 
••fust yew niioii |)o not de- 

lav ! Save the two dollars! 



The junior class in pomology ha 
taken up its outside class work in 
pruning. At present the nieinlui 
are working on renovation of oltl 
apple trees. The class will renovate 
the orchards of Miss Tripp ami Mr 
Nash, east of AxthSTSt. 

KXTKVsloN si i.\ n 1 . 

That the extension schools of agri- 
culture held in various parts of tl 
state last year were I great BU CO S W 
being very thoroughly shown attic 
present time by the increasing num- 
ber of calls coining to the extension 
set sice, for the holding of tin- 
schools this year. Most of the i 

inanities where these schools m 

held daring 1911—1912 are in- 
thai the schools be repeated, ami 
many other communities are putt 
in application for si — ions. Tin 
courses have been strengthened and 
valuable demonstration mat 
added to the equipment of the depi 
meiit, so that the extension SChOoil 



WANTED ! 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

1'iiMol oo\ . 

The department of pomology 
made two very creditable ■llflWWgi :<t 
the Massachusetts fruit show recently 
held in Boston. One was the exhibit 
of twenty-eight boxes and six barrels 
of apples to show proper methods of 
packing. The otlrer was :i large dis- 
play covering the various types of 
retail packages for use in apple 
markets. ISoth displays were of 
decided educational value and staged 
in an attractive manner. They proved 
to be leading features of the show. 
The college was awarded a handsome 
silver medal in recognition of the aX- 
hil.it. 

Apple picking has just been com- 
pleted at the Graves orchard in Sootfc 

Amherst, under lease to the experi- 
ment station. The crop amounted to 

826 barrels which is very good con- 
sidering the number of trees. The 



\n\one vt ho has ever sold Hooks, 
Typewriters, Insurance. Collier > 
Mining Stocks 01 anything else, to 
write me and learn how he can make 
$100 a month without making any 
investment but his time to write 

JOHN W. TALBOT, 

South Rend, Ind. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATORS 



Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

'IM1KRE are special advantages in using; 
1 a good cream separator during th«- fill 
and winter months. 

The milk from cows long in lactation is 
hardest in i-rram.-and likewise li.irdi-st to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
highest, so that the WSSti ■( gravity setting 
or a poor separator counts for most. 

Then there's the sweet, warm skim-milk 
(or stock feedintr, alone worth the cost of a 
separator in cold weather. 

There is surely no reason to delay the 
purchase of a separator or to continue the 
: an inferior one. A He Laval machine 
will save its cost by spring, and may be 
hought on such liberal terms if desired as 
to actually pay for itself meanwhile. 

See your local De Laval agent 



ft THE DE LAVAL 
-L SEPARATOR CO. 

NEW YORK 
-s« CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 
SEATTLE 
MONTREAL 
^* WINNIPEG 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

\r. being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Havt you tried them ) 

DoitH Koricet 

i hat we are carrying a good line of 
Tolmoeti 



|of 1912-1918 should prove more sat- '94.— Frederick I., GrOSfl is located 
I isftutory than ever. One or two new at Modesto, Cul.. lU-1 1 1th St. lie 

optional courses have been added, is engaged in teaching. 
: but the courses in fi -nit-growing and Rx-*94. — J. B. Oreen, formerly 

poultry management for the men's manager of the country department 

department **d the home makers' of Baldwin A Howell of Baa Praa- 

cisco. has resigned his position to 
take charge of the San Francis ind 



coins,- for the women's department 

seem to be the star attractions as 
always. 

The schools an- of live days' dura- 
tion, the session generally beginning 
on Monday morning and closing Fri- 
day afternoon. The instructors are 
furnished by the extension serviet of 
the college and the local expenses ale 
paid by the community . The follow- 
ing schools have b e en definitely 
arranged for: Ashtield. Dec. I 
Brimtiel.l. .Ian. 13 17 j North high- 
ton. .Ian. M M : Littleton. Feb. 10 
II. Other schools are iieingarranged 
for, the dates of which have not yet 
bean settled definitely enough |0 be 
announced 

una inn 

The library has turned over to the 
ial union room subscriptions to 

/ , /'ml, ami Lij>/>in<i,tts MatJU' 

zim . 

The Isthmian Canal commission 
has - nt to the library Volume V of 
the (anal Record, a book relating to 
all the recent news of the (anal /one. 
It is published by the government 
and tells of the life. sports and people 
in the Canal Zone besides giving a 
complete history of the progress of the 
canal. It is one of the most 
interesting liooks received and 

completes the get of live Volume* ill 
the possession of the library 



A. C. 



BIRDSUL 13 



FARRER 15 



TA»I.1«M«. I 

B I I I' II I. N |,\NK I '«>!.«; I K 

MAftrrACliKIMI •!»•« I I ' I 

I ho MUOAIiWAY, NKW VOBBS 

« I. I'll AND COl.MAiK 
IMNs AND RllfCHS .*» 

HUM", nurrn and aaiowaa *t*si»Ai>» 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

specialty of College Classes 



i Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O O A 



L 



BULLETINS BY M 
ALUMNI 

Alumni have written either alone 
in assisted in writing the following 
.\peiimeiit station bulletins duiing 
the past \ear. 

'h:|. — •• Field experiments <»n indi- 
vidual farms"- Kxperimeuts with 
grafts, potatoes, cantaloupes, aspar- 
agilH, soybeans, cow peas, turnips and 
- conducted by II. J, Wheeler of 
the Rhode Island experiment station 

'H'J. — "The gain in nitrogen during 
a five-year ml experiment with differ- 
ent legumes." bs Hurt L. Ilartwell of 
the Rhodl Island experiment station. 

'02.— •'l'l-elimiiiiiry frost fighting 
studies, in the Rogue River valley," 
by C. I. Lewis of the Oregon experi- 
ment station. 

'or. Influence of MCH si ng in in- 
creasing the yield of the tomato," also 
•An expeiimcnt in breeding apples." 
by Richard Wellington of the New 
N oik agricultural experiment station 

at Geneve. 

•Oil. — ••Seed tests made at the 

station during I'.tll" by T.C. French 
also of the Gotten station. 



the Graham agency forces of the 

Graham farm lauds oompaaj of 

(irahain. Fr»-siio county, Cal. This 
company is about to put on the 
market in M and 1<> acre tracts. 
72.(MKI eereS of irrigated alfalfa land, 
located in Fiesno county. 

';,h. —Charles N. Baxter, after 10 
years of service in the library of the 
Boston Athenaeum was appointed 
in April. I '.'1 2, librarian of the .lames 
Rlaekstoiie memorial library at 
Riaiifonl. ( i. 

'. i>. A. Beaxsaa if safaged in 
gr owi n g pineapples at Rio Pled 
Porto Ric<>. 

'.•:i.-W. F. Chapiu, l'ortland. 

Maine, director of eommeremi depart- 
ment of high school and principal of 
ning high school. 
i \ .'•.<:•. \ \ Brnttotts i- snpei 

iutemhnt of Wellington farm, Wel- 

lesiev Farms. 

•(Mi \ \\ Morrill and I. \ 
Rack oj are the authors of Rulletiu 
No. lOii of the I B. bureau of 
entomology, entitled ••The natural 
control of white Hies in Florida. 
The\ hate f«»r a long time been al 
work on this problem as special field 
:i-enis of the government and the 
n suits of their invesiigations is sum- 
marized in a IB-page bulletin illus- 
trated by nine plates. The Sttbjt Ct 
is one of great importance to the 
Southern citrus grower, to whom tins 
insect is a \ lottS p'st. 

'OJ.-tleoige i; O'llearn of Fitts- 
tield, whs one of the speakers at a 
student mass meeting at College on 
Thursday evening. He has been 
-ting coach Brides with the team 
during the past week. 

'u7. .1. T. Caruthers is the head 
of the agricultural department of the 
Agricultural and Industrial slat-- 
normal s.Imm.I at Nashville. Telin. 
II. is also engaged in the raising of 
ho-s on an extensive scale on a farm 
of his own at Columbia. 

tW. ChsrlsS I'- Allen, care of 
Siininoiis Hardware ( o., Sioux City. 
Iowa. 

'OH. — lames A. Hyslop is the 
author of bulletin '.»•"». part VII of the 
Rill, of Fnt. entitled. '-The alfalfa 
loopel."' which is all IH-page. well 
illustrated repoit of investigations 
conducted in the state of Washington. 




MASSACHUSETTS NORTHERN RARWAY 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 



CAP A GOWNS 

I othe Am* oUagasfroai (he At- 

lantic to the Pacific Cla.is ContracU a 
Specialty 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



a; Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'91.— .Tohn R. Hull Jr. of Oreat 
Harrington, has been ele<ted repre- 
sentative 
district. 



from the *th Berkshire 



'|0.— Fred P. Nickles-s has been 
tiansferied from the horticulture t«. 
the fibre division of the Philippine 
islands bureau of agriculture and is 
conducting experiments in the pro- 
duction Of tropical librc-producing 
crops He finds the work very inter- 
esting. He will slay three years in 
the islands. 



Clostd only from I A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Toefll Mientka 

Shoes sinned and Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open SiiiuUy M»ln SI. 

On way to Post office. 



1 









The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, November 19, 191 a. 



' 1 



EMBOSSED 
FRATERNITY 
AND COLLEGE 
STATIONERY 

At Half-price 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 

Ainlierat, Ma«a« 

AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10- 15c 
2 I iC 
2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Strain Creasing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



K vlimi J. Doiuen, Agent, 7 North Cottage 

Kl>WAKI> C. BUlWARM, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose 



Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 



Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



The Massachusetts AericulturalColta 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Hbrticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



E. E. MILLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jewblmy 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String 
AMHKKST, MAss. 

Next n> P ost < iftice. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone 50-, 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. Dance 85 Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
t Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association. 

Baaeball Association. 

Track Association, 

Hotkey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Kifle club. 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen In<l< x. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Sto.kbridge Club, 



MM H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. D. <>iiggs, Piosident 

J. W. Covill, Manager 

L. Edgar Smith, Manager 

E. II. Coopei. Manager 

W. S. Little, Manager 

( Bokclund, Manager 

J. W. T. Insure, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

.1. I). French, Manager 

o. O, Anderson. Manager 

E. S. Clark, dr., Manager 

L. G. Davies. President 

,1. L. Mayer. President 

\V. V Little. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 



IP hen Fitting Oat Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wriulil vV Dltaon 

Catalogues of 

l^ciii «v Winter QOOCla 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Ci 
Students and Athletes who want the resl. sui • 
artitles (or the various s|>orts should insist 
those liearinK the Wright & Ditson Trade M 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShots 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



Wright & Ditson Goods are the standard 1 
all sports 

wttiomr at nrrisox 

|aj A olmigton M . Boston, M 



JACKSON & CUTLEX 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock KVERY night 

Corni-r Amity and I'leaaant Strreta 



If you want to be 

MILIII WITH THK GIKI.N 

yon sunt have your clothe* pre* *-l ami cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



Preaalng in<l Cleaning a specialty 

Mont liberal ticket system In town 

Tel. ana- 1 1 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

(Jnlrkoat Service, Heat Work, Lowest Pt laa 

All wolk carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, suits, tiant . I 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suits a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. 



Tel. N 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKi: on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rates 



AMHERST k SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1814 by Samuel Bowie- 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 1 I s 

The Republican gives the best rer< 
Agricultural College and Amber it 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Daily, $g. Sunday, p. Wttki), %i> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

_ — . . _- . . ._ _ ~ ^» — ,^ a ,- _._ .—_*-. ^*^^m ■ ■— .»—. sr— 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 26, 1912. 



No. 



1 1 



SENIOR SMOKER 



1913 Men Gather in Social Union Room. 
Members of Faculty Speak. 

The class of 1918 revived its plan 
of class smokers when it held the 
first senior smoker of the year in the 
socia l union room. The list of fac- 
ulty speakers secured for the evening 
and an abundant supply of refresh- 
ments, proved a strong drawing card, 
and practically the entire class was 
oa hand when the evening opened. 

It. S. Fay introduced the speakers 
and called first on J. \V. Murray. 
His characteristic speech was fol- 
lowed by short talks from Prof. Has- 
brotiek, Instructor Gheiiowcth and 
Prof. Sprague. S. M. Jordan, I). F. 
I laker and G. A. Post also spoke. 
Music was a feature during the course 
<il tin- eveiiingand besides the singing 
of the class, selections were given by 

inartet" composed of Cobb, / 
briskie, French, Klls and Horden. 
.Ionian, French and Uorden per- 
formed on their mandolins with con- 
siderable vigor and succ< The 
'Meeting about the great log-fire was 
luiled at a late hour by singing 

>onsof Old Mass'ehusetta." 



LARGE HOCKEY SQUAD ANNUAL RECEPTION 



oorpiacticc 
Little, Kllis. Mob, 



PROFESSOR VAN DYKE IN 

CHAPEL 

SondftTi Professor Paul Van Dvke, 

professor of history at Princeton 

university, delivered the sermon in 

< haixl taking for his text --What do 

ye x ban others?* lie said that 

y heap up great wealth are 

_,isg more than others in this 

sei -5 .-, It is not the amount nor 

res •§ c ut the nature of the deed 

>.^jf tines its worth. He brought 

->ut £ a undatneiital Christian truths 

in i^i I trisou with a rising modern 

•lot "Law is greater than 

Is, and life is greater than law." 
In applying the lesson of his sermon 
vei y.lay life he said : "There arc 
attitudes commonly found among 
"Hep- men toward college life ami 
1 fellow students. Some work 
for what they can get out of 
men. looking for influence ami 
r and shunning those below 
a. Their entire actions are gov- 
I by what they want. The other 
of men are the opposite, in one 
••d are yet just as selfish. 
<•> care too little for the opinions 
"tliers, and spend all their time 
lying and getting all they can out 
heir courses without doing a tu- 
tor the common good. They 
'•w themselves till they become 
ing machines on legs." 



At Work. Good Showing from Fresh- 
man Class. 

Every afternoon the drill hall is 
the scene of a fierce hockey scrim- 
mage, ami pucks are flying in every 
direction. The following men are 
working out at iiidoorjnaetice 

19 13— Manager 
Uullard, Greenleaf, Pillsbury, Griggs 
and Brewer.** 

1914 — Captain Hutchinson, .loties. 
Needham and Heffroii. 

1916 — .Johnson, Archibald, Draper, 
White, Patterson and Hartley. 

1916— MacI>onald, Ferttald, Pal- 
mer, Curtin. Chisholm, Sanderson. 
Met 'ulloek, Blanpcid, Rogers, Swan, 
Scheiinvan. Bradley, Hathaway, 
Payne, Hunt, Huntington, Choatc. 
Fisher, Doggett. Deering and 
Wildon. 

The freshmen seem to have an 
abundance of good material, which, 
when properly developed, will be of 
great value to the Hew hockey coach 
in rounding out a star aggregation. 

The sophomore candidates for 
assistant manager are as follows : — 
Weed. Draper. Pike, Fuller, Fanai 
nnd Wrigh* y ' 

been built on the west bank of the col- 
lege pond foi the use of the plavis 
in putting on their skates. 

Manager Little deoifwfl all who in- 
tend purchasing hotkey skates to see 
him before doing so. 



1 Phi Kpsilon held their initia- 
•anqoti Saturday evening at the 
ect House. 



SENATE REORGANIZATION 

At a mass meeting after assembly 
the plan suggested last year of chang- 
ing the representation in the senate 
was <lis« -us.sed. It was moved and 
carried that the senate should bring 
the matter up more fully at some 
mass meeting in the coOTM of five 

Weeks. 

For the benefit of those unac- 
quainted with the proposed plan it is 
stated as it was drawn up early in the 
vear by a senate member of the class 
of 1912. By this plan the senate 
would consist of two men from earls 
fraternily. live non-fraternity im -n. 
men elected from the senior ai 1 
junior classes at large nnd the heads 
of each recognized student activity. 

The senate does OOf feel entirely 
satisfied with this scheme. however. 
and is at work, with the assistance of 
President Btitt.-ilield. trying to draft 
a more practical plan of reorganiza- 
tion. President Butterfield has made 
it pbtin that the senate has not been 
dilatory in regard to the matter, 
through choice. The President's 
time has been too much taken by col- 
lege affairs to permit him to consult 
with the senate in regard to the mat- 
ter, up to this time. 



By Ladies of Faculty at Drill Hall. 
Many Novel Features. 

A pleasant surprise was awaiting 
those of the facility MO* students who 
attended the annual reception in the 
drill hall, Saturday night, in honor 
of the football men. The semi- 
folinal receiving line of former years 
was missing and a novel sulislitulc 
took its place. 

Each student, freshman or senior 
appeared with I tag on his coat lapel 
hearing his name and without any ado 
was invited to participate in the 
games provided. The archery range 
was crowded throughout the evening 
by (hose whose h«>|»es of finally hitting 
the target never waned. At one 
table embryo artiotw wort beguiled 
into giving expression to their ideas 
in clay, while at another fortune* 
were freely di-peiised. 

It could easily be seen by the poor 
showing of some of our leading 
faculty members that I COOTM in 
animal husbandry would have helped 
some in the placing of the iloiik 
tail. Other of our scholastic mentors 
failed laincntaMv when it came to 
sketnbiug the outline of a fin 
pOfkOff when they wen- blindfolded. 

Finally Hie tables were pushed 
lajde and with the shicoptiean spot- 
light upon the little cabinet upon tin- 
raised platform those plesellt wit- 

ied a rerj interesting series •-) 

tableaux. Professor Lewis read let- 
purpoitiug to give the experi- 
ences of an American \oiith travel- 
ling around the world. The various 
types Of national beauty were repre- 
sented by ladies of the faculty and 
the success of the impersonations tfj 
evidenced by the hearty applause 
greeting each tableau. 

At the conclusion of this entertain- 
ment, refreshments weie served and 
dancing continued foi sonic time. 

BjJ those preeenf it was unanimously 
voted that the new type of '"reception" 
could not be sPOOned ill point of 
enjoyment l»v the old si \ le. 



BREWER ELECTED 



Halfback to Captain Next Year's Eleven. 
Fourteen Men Get Letters. 

Harold w. Brewer 1914, of Mt. 

Vernon. K. Y., was elected captain 
and Stanley P. l-'r.eboin 1911, of 

Marlborough, waa elected manager of 

next year's footl.all team at a recent 
meeting of tin- men who made their 
letters this past season. Biewer is 
the heaviest back on the team weigh- 
ing about 169 pounds. He made the 
team his freshman yeai and did wry 
creditable work at fullback. Last 
year he was shifted to left halfback 
which position he has also played tin- 
past season. 

"Mike" is a consistent ground 
gainer and until he received an injury 
to his foot during the baseball season, 
he did good work in the punting 
department. Willi his long experi- 
ence on the team he should OfOvw to 
be a capable leader. 

The athletic board awarded letteis 
to the following men : Captain Sam- 
son 'l:l, (. 1.1, O'Brien 18, 
i iihaure '1.1, Brewer '11, Baker 
'I I, (iiillii.'U, Smith'M. Nle» nil, 
Kdgertoii Ml, Dole '16, Melican 'I... 
Mt'i ami Manager ( ovill. 



NOTICE. 

The annual reunion and informal 
banquet of the Western Alumni as- 
sociation will be held at Chicago, at 
the Onion League club, N W. .Jack- 
son Boulevard, on l-'ridav evening, i 
Dec f-th. ;it 7 o'clock. Every 
alumnus or ox-man who is in Of near 
Chicago a( the time is cordially re- 
quested to attend. Please notify I 
the secretary at once that it is your 
intention to be present and "Boost 

Old Aggie." 

Chas. A. Tikuki.i.. 

Haiold J. Morse M4 of Townsend 
has pledged Theta Chi. 





w' 




1 


w w 


1 


**•» 


sf J 


■ 

r m 




f 


1 






t0 \C 



Captain H. W . BRSWU 

The tOM- will lose four excellent 
men in June by graduation. Samson 
and Kisenhaure will leave a hole in 
the line, Gore will be missed from tin- 
quarterback position and O'Brien 



M 













The College Signal, Tuesday, November 26, 19 12 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 26, 1912. 



goes after four years of service at 
right (ixl. Coach Bridd has Wen 
looking forward continually in 
developing the team tliis IfllMM ami 
already has several strong men in 
lino for these positions. 

With Dr. Hrides in charge again 
next year ami the large number of 
veterans who will he available, pros- 
pects are brighter than ever before 
for a strong el« v*n next fall. Cap- 
tain Brewer and Manager Freeborn 
have already found some promising 
prep material which promises to build 
up another strong freshman eleven 
and perhaps till some of the vacancies 
ou the vanity • 



parents ; his second to himself and 
his third to lii> institution. 

\\V all should envy young men 
like these and not condemn them as 

ualoyal to their ooUege, becaaas they 

( | u M1)t g»( out for athhtio. and pnb- 

li,.lv denounce than, by calling than 
tit candidates for the pond. Pint 

investigate the conditions with which 
than freshmen are existing in col- 
lege, before passing judgment. 
IfalM the penalty lit the crime, but 
take off your hat to the fellow that 
gOM home to do the chores to earn 
the money required to obtain a col- 
lege education 

Sincerely yours, 

An Instructor. 



TEACHERS WANTED FOR 
CLASSES 

At FirkUj morning chapel Mr. F. 
H. Kindle who is one of the most 
active workers of the V. M. C. A. 
mad.- an appeal to Aggie men to help 
along the industrial set viee plan. 

Mr. Kindge .said that in his talk 
with big business men, the j»oint that 
college graduates were too theoretical 
and could not handle men was always 
emphasized. In this industrial ser- 
vice work a man BM an excellent 
Opportunity to acquire this much- 
neede.l le.piiMte. by teaching Kuglish 
t<> classes made up of foreigners. 

During tin- <ouise of the<lay a num- 
ber of students eoalerrad with Mr. 

Kindge relathc to the work that may 
be done about Amherst along this 
line. 

Further information as to this 
year's plans can bt secured from 

p,,st 18 and Darin 'i I. a »w> 

erable numUr of men from this col- 
lege taught foreigners last year. 



KiuToKs ok Tiik College Signal:— 

/;..//• sirs: 

-The Springfield Y. M. C A. col- 
lege put up the pluckiest light of any 
team which the Indians have faced 
this year. The contest was even 
superior to that with Pennsylvania." 
This was the opinion of Coach Cleiin 
WarneroftheCarisleteam, expr. 
after Saturday's exhibition. One 
thing is certain, the statement in last 
week's editorial column of the Si..\ \i. 
was fully proved, Springfield's team 
this year was the greatest scoring 
machine ever turned Ml by the insti- 
tution. The data disappointment at 
_:gie" as a result of the game with 
its old rival can now be viewed in a 
little different light. Credit is due 
the Spiingtield college and Coach 
M. Curdy for a plucky and finished 

eleven. 

Very truly yours, 
L \V. Davis '11. 



WHILE THEY LAST 

UP-TO - DATE TAN SHOES 

ONLY $3.00 

We carry the largest stock of COLLEGE 

FOOTWEAR east of New York. 

'« Going Some" 

EXPERT REPAIRING 




Pheasant 

HmttE St., 
Bmbcrst 

Telephone 470 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
AFTERNOON TEA 

Dinner if arranged for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at ij Pleasant St. 



Pages Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Meuautifilile W«»te»« 



MHS. ALDBN 

House Next to Laundry. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communications to the SifiSML concerning 
matter", of general interest are welcomed. The 
Sh.NAI, 1* not to bt held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

Editors or Tiik Com. MM Sioual : — 
Jj> < : 

Public' < litiiisin of a person ruts 
a gash that Utftt :• scar, bt it for 
good or be it for harm. Many stu- 
il.nts (Html colleges, everywhere, 
to seek an education, whereby they 
may be able to better serve the peo- 
ple, to pay I debt to themselves and 
to be the pride of their parens. 
M. A. C. students are types of tl. 
A large percentage of them are pay- 
ing their way through college. 
These are the real loyal students of 
the college, because the education, 
which M. A. C gives them, will be 
looked back upon with pride, in after 
life. A book education is not com- 
plete J they must mix with the social 
world. Athletics is a pastime, 
which every student may enjoy, and 
should if at all possible. If parents 
object to a certain class of athletics, 
he should persuade them to grant 
him permission to play, or not partic- 
ipate ; if he is physically disabled, he 
should not play ; if his time is occu- 
pied bv college work he should not 
play, for his first duties are to his 



INDEX NEWS 

Following the custom of the years, 
the lit 14 Inthx will appear on the 
( ampus during the week preceding 
the Christmas recess, just in time to 
take one to show the home people, 
or to give as a present to that girl, 
.lust save up I little on your candy 
and "smokes," a half dollar a week, 
from now until the volume is offered 
for sale, and bv "passing over" the 
accumulated savings to the board 
you will reeeivc the "best ever." 
You will never regret it. 



E. B DICKINSON D. D S. 

DENTAL **002H» 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Orncs Hours: 
etolBA.M. |,»otoflP.M, 



Fill & Winter Suits & Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order & Ready to Wear Suit* 

Latest Styles 
in Mackinaws 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOY TONIC 



Kid ridge '14 



Kendall '16 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mass. 

H. B. WHITE 'IS. Agrnt 
10 Allen Street 



ft 



When the Ii\<Ux arrives, take as 
your motto -Do it now," and buy 
without delay. The book is being 
given away at two "bones," it's 
easily worth five. 



STYLISH 
STATIONERY 



The printing of the book this year 
is superb, the arrangement is unique 
and the material is of the best. An 
interesting system of cuts of certain 
"heads" creates an unflagging Inter- 
H( which is never lessened until the 
volume is examined from cover to 
cover. Even then a frequent re- 
reading is the rule. Buy it! Show 
it to your friends, and "Boost Old 
Aggie.*" 



Style as well as Quality are Narked 
Features of our Stationery. -:- -:- 



Freshmen! If you don't know 
what the IfMMMi is, ask an upper class- 
man. If you haven't seen one, ask 
an upper classman. Start your col- 
lege career right, by obtaining the 
first volume of your college life 
records. Don't be afraid to ask 



Handsome writing papers in different tint and fabric effects, 

Use high quality stylish stationery and be in 

good form all the time. 

l»r»o «.«xl 50o ep*?t» box. 



Henry Adams & Co 

Ttl«3 KBXAIyL Store on ttie Corner 




questions of the board. They are 
in existence to answer qucstious about 
their product. Show your college 
spirit by supporting one of its most 
permanent activities. 



For the benefit of the freshmen it 
may be well to give again the board 
of editors : 

Editor-in-Chief, s. it. Foster. 

Assistant editor, U. S. Bragg. 

Associate editors, S. B. Freeborn. 
C. K. Wheeler. 
L. II. Taylor. 
M. I). Lincoln. 

W. Nicolet. 
Bokelund. 
L Coe. 
Photograph editor, T. \Y. Nicolet. 

Business manager, K. S. Clark, Jr. 
Assitant business manager, T. A. 

Nicolet. 
Advertising manager,!,. Finest Smith. 



Art editors, T. 
C. 
A. 



Don't go home without an Imler! 

CAMPUS NOTES 
The ladies of the faculty daetrya 
much credit for the reception Satur- 
day evening. The entertainment 

was decidedly original and pleasing. 

Freshmen — There is a cement walk 
leading up to the dining hall which 
is supposed to be used. The path 
leading to the east door was aband- 
oned last spring and newly seeded. 

The manager of the freshman track 
team is planning a dual meet for his 
charegs with the Amherst freshmen. 
With the board track ready for u-e 
and with the wealth of material which 
the freshmen class appears to possess. 
there is little doubt hut that a good 
team can be formed. 



Ambition 



Whether your am- 
bition rides an ox or 
an aeroplane — don't 
drive too hard. 

Learn the joy and 
renewed zest that 
comes from relaxation 
in a pipe of good to- 
bacco. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



Many of ou r aspira- 
tions turn to bitterness 
in the moment of their 
realization. 

But, up or down the 
hdder. Velvet is a con- 
stant delight — always 
temptingly rich— ever 
smooth and satisfying. 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACKINAWS 




The Fall lesson is the Sweater timenf the year. The Football 
garnet call for Mackinaws and Sweater*. We are knowing the 

best styles of the l>cst makers. No fancy prices in tin-, store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 „ 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St.. Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



M \i\ Ohm 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists nd mo.M complete 

equipment obtainable 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST (AS COMPANY 

Everything Elleotrioal 



l,'M.'B^I.!:fTTn HZZ 



FOUNTAIN PEN « p 



Minimize your fountain pen 

troubles by owning a Moore's. C. It Is the 
safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
«/ Its strength lies in Its very simplicity. Nothing 
finlky to get out of order, ft You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. 
For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adam*. <:u*h!nft & Fouler, .Selllnft Aftenta j~ * 

168 DEVONNIIIRK STREE I :: :: BOSTON. MASS. <^rr 




h 



jxJj- 













The College Signal, Tneeday, November 26, 191a. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College 



BOABD OF EDITORS 

R. Il.VANZWAI.KNIlVK'i'U.IMit.ir in Chief 
ClfKSTKR K.WIIKKI.KK i4.Mi''au'"« f,:rfitor 
OSCAR O. ANDERSON 'M. Aaaiataai i:dit..r 
FREDERICK D. GRIGGS »ij, Athletic Kditor 
8 MILLER JORDAN '13. Atiitetk Editor 
1IAKRY W. AM IN 'IJ. Alumni Editoi 

STUART B. POSTER 'u, CaiapM Editor 
R I V I N I I- . PA K K E H '14. Alumni Kditor 

HAROLD C BLACK '14. Department Editor 
J. ALBERT PRICE 'i*. Associate Editor 

GEORGE H I)(iNNEI.L'i5. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZAHKISKIE 2d, '13. •*•. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLARK. IR.'u.AsHt.Hus.Manager 
ERNEST P.UPTON'14, Asst. Ad* Manager 
MAI'RICE J. CL01 OH '15. Circulation 



Subscription $1 50 per vear Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders rayable to 
George Zabfiskie 2nd 

Bnt«r*4 u — ad r'nn matter at th« Amherr 
Port Orfle*. 



Vol. XXIII. TVRSDAT, Nov. a6. No. n 



would he an official recognition by 
the College, of the fraternity an a 
political element. The province of 
the fraternity in a purely social one, 
and the best interests of tin* College 
demand that it should be kept so. 
The student governing body is not a 
political organization ; why therefore, 
should fraternities and non-fraternity 
men demand political representation 
upon it? Such a step would mean 
the degeneration of the senate into a 
fnit'-niity hoard of arbitration into 
whose hands the settlement of r,,lh-ij»- 
questions would he put. 

The very men who drafted the pro- 
posed plan of reorganization have 
since seen its disadvantages, and 
doubt the wisdom of adopting it. 
The entire questiou comes down to 
this: The senate is doing its work 
honestly and well, why meddle with 
it? The reorganization of the senate 
appears to he an absolutely unnec- 
essary proeeeding. 



Several freshmen wanted to know 
if the newhockey shelter was a dress- 
ing room for "pea-greens" who are 
about to take an enforced bath. 

Mr. Rindge, Field Secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. was at chapel Friday 
morning and talked about the oppor- 
tunities in social service for college 
men. 

At the regular meeting of the land- 
scape art club, Mr. Harrison exhib- 
ited his herbarium of many plant 
species collected in verious sections 
of the country. 



We Carry the Largest Line 



— OF — 



The next issue of the Signal will 
be that of Dec. io. 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEPT. 



Theuk has been < i.nsiderable ques- 
tion on the part of some, as to why 
the senate bed not carried out the 
wishes of the student body, speaking 
glibly in explanation, of a motion 
passed by a mass meeting last 
spring, providing for the reorganiza- 
tion of the student governing body. 
No such motion ever came before the 
students; the suggestion of reorgan- 
ization <aine from within the samite 
itaclf, and in dealing with the matter 
slowly it is in no way proving 
"traitor" to the student body. P 
ident Hutterfield is much interested 
in the matter and asked the sen- 
ate to wait until such time as bt 
could give some thought to it. 

The plan whi<h the senate has con- 
sidered and thai for which some of 
the students are now clamoring, pro- 
vides for a membership of some M 
men. The pefSOKfttl <>f the proposed 
senate would be : live non-fraternity 
men elected by the senior and junior 
classes, a representative from each 
fraternity, three more men elected 
from the two upper classes at large, 
and the heads of such student activi- 
ties as athletics, the Christian asso- 
ciation, the Sionm.. the musical 
clubs, and the like. 

DoeS die senate really need organ- 
ization? The work that the senate 
Radi to dO affects ttW student lwdy 
as a whole, and atTects it in only a 
\crv general way. This work has 
been done impartially and well. 

There is little ■ 1 of the beadd of 

the various student activities holding 
senate positions. Whenever it has 
to deal with matters pertaining to 
athletics or some other activity, the 
senate does not hesitate to call into 
consultation the leaders of those in- 
terests, both undergraduates and 
faculty. 

The election of fraternity men to 
the senate (M fraternity representa- 
tives would be most unwise. It 



Tiik correspondent in the last issue 
of the Sionai. evidently has the 
impression that there is a rule on the 
statutes which requires a senior to 
return the salute given him by a 
fn-diman Such is not the case : the 
rule applies only to the freshman. 
It rests with each senior merely as a 
OMdlthT <>t courtesy whether or not 
he return the salute. The rule is 
far from popular with the upper class 
concerned, but the sentiment is, 
"as long as then is a rule, let fresh- 
men live up to it." The rule of 
com toy. as well as the law of 
gravity, has not yet been repealed. 



HORTH IT1PT0H - 



Academy 
Music. 



WEEK OF NOVEMBER 25 



«• 



• • 



E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



EVERY NIGHT 

Prices 25c, 50c and 75c 



MATINEE WED. AND SAT. 

Prices 25c and 50c 



Coolep's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

(Notice* for this column vlimild I* dropped in 
,1,- -i..\\i. Offie*orh;ii>d."lt.. Had ft. ftaM t 
14, on or before Saturday rrw'diri: each i«ue. 1 

N..N. 17-Dee.l — Thanksgiving 
Recess. 

|, (T . i_].,10r. M. Assembly. !':•- 
ident F. S. Luther, Trinity 
college, Hartford, Conn. 

Do,- :>_ f,-4.'» r. m. M. A. C. C. A. 
chapel. 

I) ei . 7 — r.-HO a. v. Social I'nion 
entertainment. Dean Lewis. 

1),.,.. h— ft-16 a. M. Sunday chapel. 
Rev. Henry W. Foote of 
Boston. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

It's about time that 1911 pr.Mluced 
that band. Shell out, sophomores. 

"Doc" Fay is looking for a pair of 
gum-shoes, the miscreant who stole 
that cider must be found. 

Don't forget to tell the girl when 
you go home that her presence in 
Amherst is desired Feb. 1 tth. 

The hockey squad has had a small 
house erected on one side of the 
pond for its use during the season. 

The Kennel club shines like a new- 
penny. Fresh paint and a little 
energy on the part of proprietors did 
the job. 

Doesn't it seem good to set down 
to a tablecloth once more, and to be 
able to shout when some luckless 
waiter drops a soup? 




-TTrXTT CAN WRITE PHOTO PLAYS AND 
iUU EARN $25.00 OR MORE WEEKLY 

We Will Show You How ! 

If you have ideas— if you can think— we will show you the secrets 
of this fascinating new profession. Positively no experience or literary 
excellence necessary. No « flowery language " is wanted. 

The demand for photo plays is practically unlimited. The big film 
manufacturers are " moving heaven and earth " in their attempts to get 
enough good plots to supply the ever increasing demand. They are 
offering $ioo and more, for single scenarios, or written ideas. 

We have received many letters ftom the film manufacturers, such as 
VITAGRAPH, EDISON, ESSANAY, LUBIN, SOLAX. IMP, REX, 
REI IANCE, CHAMPION, COMET, MELIES, ETC., urging us to 
send photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets of success. 

We are selling photo plays written by people who "never 
before wrote a line for publication." 

Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
good idea every week, and will write it out as directed by us, and it 
sells for only $25. a low figure. 

You Will Earn $100 Monthly For Spare Time Worh. 

-i-m-rvGi SEND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AT ONCE FOR FREE COPY OF 
FREE OUR ILLUSTRATED BOOK, " MOVING PICTURE PIAYWRITIN8 " 

Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what thi> 
new profession may mean for you and your future. 



NATIONAL AUTHORS 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 26, 191s. 



CHIEF AIMS OF MILITARY DEPARTMENT 



To Train Students in Military Manoeuvers, Experience and 

Discipline. 

Captain QaOflOR C. Maktin 



The main object of the military 
instruction given at civil educational 
institutions having army olllcers ns 
professors of military science and 
tactics is to qualify students who 
enter the military departments of 
Mich institutions to be company 
oflBoan of infantry, volunteers or 
militia. 

Infantry drill and training is to be 
considered paramount, and now 
instruction in artillery is usually pro- 
hibited because it is thought best to 
devote all the time granted by the 
colleges to one branch only. 

The War department requires that 
two-thirds of the work at least shall 
be practical and about one-third bt 
ddfOted to theory. Piactical work 
must be had in the infantry drill 
regulations, small arms tiring manual. 
I service regulations and manual 
i.f guard duty. 

The foregoing subjects are taken 
up at this institution in the order 
named, and the work prosecuted as 
i.ipidly as is consistent with thorough 
work and acceptable results. In 
addition to the above, practical work 
b done in Butt's manual of phyical 
drills, and time is devoted to guard 
mounting and to other military cere- 
monies. The al»ove subjects are 

• studied in class-room one hour 
I week being given for recitations 
both the sophomore and junior 

- 
Other theoretical instruction is 
given from time to time consisting of 
talks ami lectures, and keeping in view 

aye the main object of the military 
instruction — to qualify educated 
young men to be company officers of 
infantry. All auxiliary subjects and 
"ulijects pertaining to the larger mil- 

> questions, such as campaigns, 

• icgy, etc., are aa a rule omitted. 
The professor of military wcience 

tactics endeavors to impart a 

full knowledge of the beuefits to the 

<>n, state institution and student 

of the military training. To this 

a talk or lecture is given to the 

hi entering explaining the main 

• t of the military instruction 

to make clear to the student the 

I" iiefits to be conferred by the mili- 

t raining, not only in fitting him 

the full duties of citizenship but 

in giving him the the normal 

1 ival development necessary to 

1 intinued well-being throughout 

1 < •graduation a lecture is plan- 

* each class that each member 

may have a knowledge of the 

purpose, and necessity for an 

•'' A brief resume of the military 

hi y, the military system, ami the 

" iv policy of the United States. 

department uow has an exc el- 



lent outdoor range and a good indoor 
range. Rifle practice is earned on 
to a much greater extent than for- 
merly and each student must com- 
plete a certain prescribed course 

before gradastiou. That this part of 

a soldiei's education is well looked 
after, or at least is with a large num- 
ber of students, is readily seen by 
the fact that the rifle team at this col- 
lege holds at present both the indoor 
and outdoor intercollegiate champion- 
ships and hopes soon to add a third 
championship. 

So much for the present. Much 
has been done for the department 
daring the past five years. It is felt 
that it is improving each year. The 
trustees believe in its work and help 
in every way poooMft. But d<>« > it 
really tit young men to be olllcers of 
infantry? Yes, but only partially. 
Much is still to Ik* desired. It is 
hoped and believed that improve- 
ments will be constantly made. The 
War department advises an annual 
encampment That will come in 
time. Then it is hoped that the 
battalion will be made a part of the 
state militia ; that the state will pay 
the officera and the student IkmIv when 
in stale encampment. This should 
be done and when it is done then the 
department will really begin to edu- 
cate the young men here to be valu- 
able, or more valuable, as otUcers of 
infantry for the volunteers or militia. 

I hope to see the day when the 
cadet corps hen- will be 1 part of the 
•tatd militia and all uniforms, text- 
books, room rent, light, etc., to be 
paid for by the state in return for 
the duty rendered by the young men. 
It ought to l>e a prize battalion for 
some near-by regiment. 

In 1862 Dated States Senator 
Morrill noted how much better OfeV 
cored the Confederate army was than 
the Union army. Due to this fact 
he included in his bill for the estab- 
lishment of the land grant colleges 
the requirement that among other in 
strnction should be military drill 
because a great many of the officers 
of the Confederacy had had their 
training at the military schools. For 
many years the colleges cared for the 
military feature only because of the 
by-products. Only in the last few 
years has the value from a military 
standpoint been appreciated. 

It has been said that our system of 
military training in schools and col- 
leges has already saved us from one 
war. A few years ago, during the 
controversy between the United 
States and Great Britain over Venez- 
uela, Great Britain sent three of her 
most trusted army olllcers to Amer- 
ica incognito to report upon our pre- 
paredness or unpreparedness for a 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 

Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, containing the right amounts of 
available nitrogen, in both chemical and organic forms, with an SRCeSt 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric acid, both for fertilizing and catalyz- 
ing effects, and the proper amount and right form of potash, all thor- 
oughly blended together and in forms that will not cake, but remain in 
a drillable condition, and which will act not only in the beginning, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the needs of the crop and 
market requirements), are what the practical farmer should rely upon in 
. growing commercial crops. Ahove all things, he should avoid unbal 
anced and improper mixtures that have the defect of one element l>eing 
insoluble and another element too soluble for successful plant growth. 



Study the Plant Food I'roblem 
— There is something in it. — 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



P. A. SHERARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 




TEIST TO 03STE 

That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a O & K. 

CAMPION. »ol«- A-vni. 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 

— We make them all and make them right at 



1 ■ 





Collojic* Stores, 






The College Signal, Tuesday, November 26, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 26, 191a. 



The Folyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Ura^s I'lpc Valves 
and Pitting! fof Steam, Water ami (ia-«. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Belter ;m<l l'ipe Coverings, 1'ipe 
Cut to sketch. Mill Snpflies. Engineeri and 
Contractors foi SteaaxanVI Hot Watei Heating, 
Automatic sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kn^ite 
Connections. - Holyoke, Masa. 



theTeachers Exchange 

Of Boston 120 Boylslon St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



fight. Thev traveled throughout our j "grafter" and the cheat to feel dis- 
count, v separately, visiting every ' graced, even though no one finds him 
■action Of it. and their reports were out; and makes it uncomfortable fof 
practically the same. All reported a man guilty rjf such deeds to live 
that we had a well-disciplined stand- with his own soul. 



C&rpfivtcr & Morehoust, 



PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Fnlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash BlocK, Amherst 



II \| Ktx.ERS, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St.. 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

iN -5 7 standard of Excellence for over 50 Years ) 1 f > 1 12 

QUALITY that means ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study Efficiency and Economy In the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer ; but It Does Mean the u*e of the Corn ct 
Amount of the Right Kind of I ertlllzerfor Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER to meet the monuments 

of every crop <"< every Kind of soil. Osm experts (who are 

practical farmers) will be glad feo assist you in Making your selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Values than are 
the nost Expert Chemist*. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

p.-ware of those fertilizers whose only commendation is a "cut 1 in price. 
This is an admission of one of two things- either tiny have been too 
high priced in ilu past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station:- "The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends »ot so mw h upon what is paid for it, u upon the 
character of the materials used to make it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty years' use by the 
best fanners and vegetable growers. 

insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be "just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will he 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 

51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



ing army of about twenty-live thous 
and men, that need not be taken into 
serious account; that our national 
guard was. thev said, in most places 
a very nice little club, but totally 
and absolutely inellicient as a ftght- 
in" machine— neither oflieers or men 
being really trained in military mat- 
ters; that our material for a volun- 
teer army was found plentiful unto 
million!, but these would be without 
proper leadership, olliri-ring ami train- 
ing, and would be a mere mob so far 
as discipline was eoneerned and mere 
food for disease and deaths in camp. 
Hut each of them traveled through I 
part of our eoiintrv where a great 
many small military academies exist, 
so thev reported further that "on 
every se\enth hill-top" was to be 
found a military academy which had 
probably for years been turning out 
graduates fully capable of stepping 
right in and training, disciplining, 
earing for and leading the hordes of 
volunteers for our use. And becau-e 
of this one factor they advised peace 
if possible. We know how they 
erred. U it not up to us to make 
good what thev thought these schools 
to be? 

If we have available a sullicient 
number of men. citizens, trained and 
ready to ellieientlv otli.er our volun- 
teer forces and to train Ihem from 
the instant thev are enrolled for 
ilutv. that is all that is necessary and 
a large standing army will never be 
Beaded. Their health, their food. 
their camping sites, their water, and 
their drill and discipline wotdd be 
properis looked after from the very 
first moment ; and instead of having 
thousands ill with fever, dysentery, 
etc., necessitating other thousands 
to guard and nurse them, and finally 
m -tilting after mativ months in a 
fores of half or less than half as 
many effectives as we started with 
and they not yet well-drilled ami dis- 
ciplined — instead of these we should 
have the most effective care, drill 
and discipline administered from the 

first. 

Such would be the result from I 
milita.iy point of view if properly 
tarried on. In addition there are 
many resulting by-products of great 
value to I student. His education 
would be of greater value to him 
The untidy is taught to be neat, the 
dilatory to be prompt, the idler to be 
industrious, the awkward tob.-graee- 
fill, the reserved and bashful to be 
self-confident ami to have poise, and 
the forward and dominating to learn 
due modesty and a proper apprecia- 
tion of the rights of others Also a 
more thorough and comprehensive 
understanding of the duties and priv- 
ileges of citizenship, and I more defin- 
ite appreciation of law and Order. 
Military instruction imparts a code 
of honor and honesty that forces the 



FIRST PLACE FOR CORN 
JUDGERS 

The team representing this College 
won first place and a trophy in tin 
corn judging contest held at the New 
England corn exposition in Boston 
Saturday. Ik-sides Massachusetts 
the state colleges of New Hampshire. 
Maine and Connecticut were entered 

in the tensest. Qeatill of M. A. C 

won fust place, and McDougall ai, 
BrOWfl of M. A. C. tied for second 
so all the highest honors went to th- 
team from this College. In addition 
to the permanent silver tropin 
awaidtd the team, (laskill w 
awarded an individual trophy. 

This judging contest marks tin 
(lose of the season for the agricul- 
tural judging teams. 

THE VALUE OF PAGEANTRY 

The speaket at Wednesday's 
semblv was William C. l.angdon, of 
New York, who spoke of the cllici.-n- 
cv of the pageant in interesting 
people in the history of their town, 
and especially in its tendency to dt 
away with the isolation of count) \ 
life bt producing a common bond of 
interest. He said in part: 

One of the strong characteristic- 
of country life, when we establish it. 
will be the expression of outdoor lift- 
in pageants. The pageant is tin- 
"old-home week'* of all the gen 
tions. In the pageant the tlai 
the hero, and the development of tin- 
place is the plot. What value lias it 
01 will it have? This: The psopk 
unite in a drama of their town's hi-- 
tory, and it brings civic pride. The 
pageant makes new friendships, tad 
all that feeling of isolation rcc< 
severe set-back in the year long good 
time preceding the pageant. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 
Professor F. C. Sears judged *• 
applet ill the box and barrel classes 
at the apple show in Portland during 
the past week. The show was held 
in connection with the annual B 
ing of the Maine pomological - 

Dr. J. K. Shaw gave a lectin. 01 
fundamentals of apple grown 
Asl.fichl, Friday the 14th. 

Professor F. C. Sears ha- 
appointed to act on the advisory 

inith f Smith's agricultural I 

at Northampton. The cominir 
composed of five men. repre- 
tht- divisions of modern agrii it 
"It is their duty to consult fil 
advise the. local authorities in 
agement ami supervision of H 
cational work." 

The good government club ol 
liains college is taking an ad 
terett in the apple industry, 
are just completing an appl>- rvlf 



lin- 
ing 

ajd 

i.-in- 



.Vil- 
in- 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



is as much superior to other sepa- 
rators as other separators are to 
gravity setting methods. Why ^o 
hut "half-way" when buying a 
separator? Why not insure satis- 
faction by getting a DE LAVAL? 










l 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



Itroa-lwav, 
n. w r«rk. 



29 R. Ma-IUon St., 

llilcaft-o. 



THE KEfWL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

beiag baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

l>ori*t Forget 
Taat we are carrying a good line of 

Tolniooo 



BIRDSAU '13 



FARRER 15 



K.T.ai.iaam IHM 

St i ; i * i i k n Ij a n 1 ; F < n . < j k u 

M\jriTA<TIK|M. JK.VVI I KM 



Iho uuoa DWATi 



NKW VOKK 



OIATB ami ror,I,i:n i 
Pllfl A>-|> MIMiH * 

•-•Hi,, sll.VKH AND IIHDNZR MRIIAIJt 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A specialty of College Classes 



1 lis St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. Ft. ELDER 



of Williamstown which will be pub- 
lished in the spring. On invitation 
of the club, Professor F. C Seats 
and Mr. It. W. Kees spent last Tues- 
day in Williaiiistown. During the 
forenoon they visited some of the 
apple orchards in that vicinity. In 
the afternoon, IVofessor Sears 
gave a lecture on "Orchard pests and 
their control." Mr. Kees gave a 
demonstration of apple packing and 
I short talk on that subject. Mine 
than 100 men were preseut at the af- 
ternoon session. 

As in former years, the department 
of pomologv is exchanging collections 
of apples with 15 agricultural col- 
leges in various parts of the 1'nited 
States. During the past week, the 
localdcpartim-nt sent out its I .*> collec- 
tions, each containing a plate of each 
of the eight leading varieties grown 
in Massachusetts. Apples received 
in return for these collections will In- 
used by the class in systematic po- 
mology. This gives the class an op- 
portunity to study a larger number 
of varieties and to become familiar 
with types grow 11 in the various apple 
producing sections of the country. 

I \ll SSKM -1 .ICV II K. 

The extension tSfl ice announces 
the regular ten week;* course again 
this year. The dates are from .Ian. 
»'» to Mar. 14. The course is essen- 
tial!; the same as last year's. In- 
struction will Ire given by the regular 
faculty of the college assisted 
from time to time by non-resident 
lecturers on special subjects. Stu- 
dents will be required to elect tOOTSeS 
to make not more than M in.r less 
than 12 exercises each week. The 
arrangement of courses is such that 
students must follow certain lines of 
work. 

Professor Hind «md I'roisf 
Waide attended the association of 
American agricultural colleges ami 
experiment stations held in Atlanta, 
( •»., last week. 

UNI'"' Xl'E. 

The department is now carrying on 
weekly picture shows in the reading 
rooin in Wilder hall. The past week 
the exhibition has eOBtSStttd of \iews 
in Colorado ami New Hampshire 
comparing tin- natural scenery of the 
Fast ami West. 

lion in 1 1. 1 1 1:1 . 

Prof. White gave a lecture Tues- 
day night before the BottOfl garden- 
ers and florists club. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'HH. — Fred S. Cooley. Kdwin II. 
Dickinson and Frank F. Noses had 
:i reunion at Atlanta. Ga . on the 
12th. 

HH. — Fred S. Cooley. supers isor 
of farmers institutes in Montana, 
visited college Tuesday. 

"07.— C harles M. Parker of Ilrook- 
field had several exhibits of apples at 
the Massachusetts fruit show held at 
BotlOBi Nov. 7-10. 

'09. — The class of 11>09 was repre- 
sented at the Springfield game by the 



following men: W. F. Get*, C 8. 

Putnam, M. F. (Jeer, Arthur W. 
Hubbard, and M..T. Smulyan. 

'()!». — Henjaiiian F. Haines has sold 
his farm in Haverhill, and has taken a 
position as manager of Pinecrest 
farm, llolliston. 

'1(1. — The call for the class letters 
has just been issued. Special im- 
portance is attached as a large re- 
union is looked for in the spring. 

'10. — .Instils ('. Bailey was mar- 
ried to Miss Lvdia Lincoln Fllis on 
Sept. 27, P.M2. He is now head of 
the science department in Hust uni- 
versity in Alabama. 

'10.— Otto V. T. l"rban and ktfcl 
Annie Louise Dix were married 
Tuesday at West Newton. Mr. 
Urban will soon return with his bride 
to Savannah, Ga., where he is em- 
ployed by the American agricultural 
chemical company. 

'10. — Loajfl Itramlt who resigned 
his position as instructor in lamlsc ape 
gardening at the I'niversit) of Illi- 
nois net f0M abroad to study. Ib- 
is now located in the school of Cixii- 
h'-ign. Liverpool tttivcrsily, which 
1-. he states, the only school ju ,\. 
istem e gtYiltg a diploma in city and 
town planning. After getting famil- 
iar with the English conditions ami 

practise-he intemls to \ i-»it Oettuaiis. 
Preset and Itallv. 

Ml. — I. Nagai is now studying in 
the Lnivelsity of Heidelberg, under 
Prof. Dr. Kleb. 

Ml.— A. H. Sharps has a lot of 
big jobs along the line of landscape 
pardealatj on hand in various parts 
of Canada. 

M 2. -Albeit W. DodfSJ It spend- 
ing a few days at college. ••< berry*' 
i- now in business for himself, as 
tree expert and is located at South 
Hamilton. 

M2. — W. C. Sanctuary has beta 
spending a few days at his home in 
Amherst, during which time he \ is- 
ited friends at college. -'Hill" has 
resigned his position as superintend- 
ent of a poultry farm in Connecticut 
to take up other work. 

Fx-'LJ— N. Paul Larsen is a stu- 
dent at the Cornell medical school. 
His address is 24M, r»7th street. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Larsen writes with 
great enthusiasm of his medical 
studies. 



WANTED ! 



Anyone who has ever sold Books, 
T y p e writers, Insurance, Collier's 
Mining Stocks or anything else, to 
write me and learn how he can make 
$100 a month without making any 
investment but his time to write 

JOHN W. TALBOT, 

South Bend, Ind. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line o( College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 

STUDENT" 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Fn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR FXI'KNSFS Fnable us 
to offer an absolute lower priie 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N. Y. 




Makers 
if 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Collegia from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 



LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic Hldg., 
Northampton, Mast, 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



O0W only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes Sinned and Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
Open Nnnilay Main Si. 

On way to Pest Office. 






> ill 












DEC 1 :> 1012 





8 



The Collc«e Signal, Tuesday, November 26, 19". 






PLAYING 
CARDS 




The Massachusetts AgriculturalCollege 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

* 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER *nd OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground white you wait 

College Jhwhlky 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MA>> 
Next to Post Office. 



DRUG STORE 



Atnherat, *!«*••. 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone $9-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
a i-ac 

2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Ralph J. Bokokn. Agent. 7 North Cottage 
Howard C. Kuwabds, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Athletic Hoard, 
The College Senate, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis* Association, 

Rille club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

ML A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



WrlKlit vV Dltaaoi. 

Catalogue* of 
Infill ,v Winter Ooocls 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Col 
students anti Athletes whowant the real, sui 
articles fur U.e various sports should insist u|-n 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson I rad* Mark. 



George II . Chapman, Secretary 
F. D. Uriggs, Piesident 
S. B. Freeborn, Manager 
L. Edgar Smith, Manager 
E. H. Cooper, Manager 
W. S. Little, Manager 
C. Uokelund, Manager 
J. W. T. Lesure, Seeretai v 
Harohl F. .lones, Manager 
.1. I). French, Manager 
O. Ci. Anderson. Manager 
E. S. Clark, .Jr., Manager 
L. G. Davies. President 
.1. L. Mayer. President 
W. S. Little, President 
A. F. McDougall, President 



Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

Wright IHtson Goods are the standai 
all sport* 
WMIOMT se »lT«OX 

m Washington St.. Botfoa, M 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

Quickest Service. Itest Work, Low«i I 

All woik carafully done. Work called for an<j 
delivered. <ientV overcoat*, suits pants and 
coat*. Ladies' fine linen suits a specialty. 
Team* will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Na*h Bl'k, Amher»t. 



Tel. No- M'-* 



CARS 



Leave AQCilE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 1 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock EVERY night 

earner Amity and t»leaa»ol street* 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE CM* 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 



If jrou want to be 

HHHI WITH THK. OIR1.S 

you must have your clothe* pre*ie.l an.l cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 

11 Amity >t. H * rooa 8lore 

Pressing *nd Cleaning a specialty . 

1 1 ^ Mob1 liberal ticket system In town 

Tel. 303-11 



Special Cars at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. ' 

1424-1416 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFlUrNCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel I'. 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 

The Republican gives the best r 
Agricultural College and Ami 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %». W* 1 *'' 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 10, 1912. 



No. 12 



FRESHMAN NIGHT 



Proves Mildly Amusing to Upperclass- 
men. Vaudeville the Order. 



WESTERNERS BANQUET 

Alumni Association Dinner Held at Chi- 
cago on Friday. Twenty Si« Present. 



RIFLE MATCHES 



Although the principal sketch iu 
the freshman effort Saturday night 
had to be omitted on account of the 
siekneBs of one of the players, the 
excellent work of Fiske. Sherinyan 
and .Jenna helped to turn out a pas- 
sably creditable perfoi malice. 

The first number was entitled -hot 
air merchant," in which Nestle, by 
rBal of much walking up and down, 
managed to produce a fair number 
of jokes and more would-be witty 
remarks. 

The good work of the next per- 
formance, "The awkward squad," 
was considerably marred by the very 
poaf lighting of the stage. The 
various and raauifold trouble* of 
Lieutenant Mustard and Sergeant 
Drill in enlisting the awkward squad 
were shown by (lould and .Jerome; 
while dishing portrayed ( vrus 
(.teen, a raw country bumpkin; 
Mieriuyati represented a touchy Gar- 
man; Rich was the recently-aum -I 
Irishman who wants to fight ; and 
Bradley impersonate.! the ••effeminate 
,1, ,,f a wealthy house;" Car- 
was Bolter, a valet who is 
brought along to do all his master's 
hard and disagreeable work. 

While the lights were being fixed. 
Jenna amused the audience with 
some very (lever whistling, playing 
his own accompaniment. 

T v iske, who is a special stu- 
dei. reared as the "mystic lad." 

Fisk< rtainly proved the star 

attrac i of the whole entertain- 
ment. His palming stunts, ability 
to pro we innumerable objects from 
upl t.-nsils and wonderful caid 
tricki- nailed in quality those of 
man 'essionals. 

T» A act consisted of a repi . - 
MOjfoJloO of Darwin's theory of (di- 
lution with Hulsizer as the "missing 
link." At the conclusion of the 
>how chairs were pushed back and 
laming was enjoyed for au hour Of 
more. 



To Commence in January. Team to be 
Up to Standard of Past Seasons. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

In opposing an extended Prom 
program so as to include five days, 
President Butterfield said Wednesday 
that in his opinion it would lirst 
'lecrease the democratic spirit of M. 
\. C. by giving a few men a cham M 
-pend more money than others 
"iild afford, second, it would place 
too much emphasis on social activi- 
ties to the disapproval of most tax- 
«rs, and last from the viewpoint 
lie faculty it would iuterfere seri- 
- i-ly with "a week's work. Presi- 
nt Butterfield also disapproved of 
idea of regulating affairs at this 
allege by the rules of other colleges 
here conditions are different. 



The M. A. C Western Alumni 
association held its annual dinner at 
the Union League club, Chicago, 
Friday evening, Dec. <i. Karly in 
the evening the members and guests 
assembled in the parlors of the club 
and enjoyed a social hour together. 

The banquet was served at seven 
o'clock. Twenty-six were present, 
this being the largest attendance at 
any such meeting since the western 
association was organized. 

Myron II. West '08, president of 
the association, presided, and intro- 
.Ime.l as the first speaker of the 
evening, Ralph d. Watts '07, who 
was the official representative of the 
(..liege; iu his talk he reviewed the 
progress of the institution during the 
past few y.ars. explained some of 
the more recent features of its devel- 
opment, and outlined some of the 
more important problems now con 
fronting it. 

Dr. James B. Paige '«2 and Pro- 
faaaor Hicks of th<- College, who 
were in the West on other business, 
attended the biuui'iet and were called 
upon for brief addresses. Professor 
Hicks in his remarks explained the 
present policy of the athletic board 
with respect to the employment of 
athletic coaches for a term of years; 
he outlined his plan for the future 
development of the work in physical 
education at Aggie, and told of the 
pressing need of an athletic field. 

Thanihm .1. Hutu 11 followed 

Professor Hicks with an earnest 
appeal to the alumni for funds for 

the preparation of the athletic field. 

Others who s|»okc were John K. 
Wilder '81, Pies. Winthrop K. Stone 
'H->, of Purdue university, and L. A. 
Nichols '71. The festivities of the 
.veiling were brought to a close with 
college songs and cheers. 

The members of the Western 
alumni tioii are very loyal to 

their alma mater, and their genuine 
elithiiMasm can !"• counted upon at 
any time to "Boost old Aggie." 

Following is a complete list of 
those attending the banquet , : L. A. 
Nichols '71. Kverett B. Bragg '7. r », 
Fred N. Abercrombie ex-'*2, Dr. 
.lames B. Paige *8J, Pres. Winthrop 
K. Stone '81, Joho K. Wilder '*2. 
Royal P. Davidson ex-'!»-', Arthur B. 
Smith '95, Herbert .1. Armstrong 17, 
l'.rcival C. Brooks '02. Myron II 
West "08, Charles A. Tirrell '«><;, 
Ralph J. Watts 07, Robert. Brydon 
ex-'07. B. W. Bailev '0*, W. A. 
Cummings "08, Albert L. Whiting 
'08, Lambert S. Corbett '0i», Harold 
G. Noble *0'.». K. N. Boland '12, 
Frank B. Hills '12. Theodore J. 

tforean 'It, W. K. Philbrick '12, 
Samuel White ex-' 1 4, Prof. Curry S. 
, Hicks. 



"THE NEW BOY 



The first cut iu the uric squad 
reduces the number of men trying out 
for places on the indoor team from 
.'.<> to 2.5. These men include the 
members of last year's team, Kdinin- 
ster, Mcl)ougal,(iriggs'i:i, Forbush. 
Clark '14, Hyde '15, W hi tte more and 
the following new men : II. A.Brown 
18, M. Headle, Neal. Dunbar, Nute, 
Oertel, Donnell, Lane, Macy, R. M. 
Ipton '18, Huntington, Laird, Mout- 
gomery-Peter, Rowe, Tabor and 
Wetherbee 18. The freshman class 
contains fairly go.nl material and all 
the new candidates are showing 
up so well that it is practically ci 
tain that an even better team than 
last year will start the season of 
indoor shooting. The other college 
rille teams, however, will also show 
great improvement. 

I'pwards of ."><> men have joined 
the rille club and competition is 
strong among them for the team 
places. Of the new men. Headle 
18, Oertel, Ipton, Lane and Wether- 
bee, are showing exceptionally good 
form. After Christmas, a further 
cut in the squad will be node, reduc- 
ing the number to 12 men who will 
hi ied through the " The 

older men are l»eing pt: n bard for 
tli. place*. The indoor range is 
open to all above mentioned men 
.\.rv afternoon from the hours of 
1 -JO or 3-30 to 5-30 in charge of the 
sergeant and one of the members of 
last year's team. 

The intercollegiate ritle schedule 
is expeeted from Washington within 
the next few weeks. All rille 
matches commence the first week in 
January. A match is to he arranged 
with Springfield technical high school 
for 10 of the new men, as an incen- 
tive for the development of BOH 
material and in order to see what tin- 
new men can do in a regular match. 
None of the old men will be allowed 
t.. . ompete in this match. 



To Make Initial Bow at Montague on 
Thursday in Preparation for Trip. 

Rehearsals of "The New Boy" are 
befog hold every evening, under 
the direction of James K. Mills '77 
in preparation for the lirst perform- 
ance of the year, to be given at Mon- 
tagu*', Thursday, Dec. 12 Several 
member* of the orchestra will accom- 
pany the east, t«> play for the recep- 
tion and dance that will follow the 
show. Fver since the Roister Dois- 
ters have been in existence, it has 
been the custom to put on the first 
show at Montague, and if past expe- 
rience be any criterion, a large 
and enthusiastic audience may be 

expected. 

The costumes have arrived, and 
the til st dress rehearsal was held on 
Saturday evening. Sunday morning 
pictures of the cast were taken in the 
Academy of Music, Northampton, 
by White's Studio. These pictures, 
together with press reports of tin- 
play as perforincl elsewhere, will lie 
used in the preparation of a prosp 
UM that will bo eent ahead U> the 
various towns that will be visited on 
the Christmas I 

.•aofe in the play has been 
made recently. H. D Brown '14 
has found it n irv to drop out 

hii.I GfcMrer Howe '18 hOfl taken his 
part. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Christian association meeting 
on Thursday was addressed by 
Griggs 18 on "A new system of 
playing athletics." Origgs attended 
the Silver Bay Y. M. C. A confer- 
ence last year and brought back 
many new ideas in the ha ml ling of 
boys' work. Perhaps the most im- 
portant was a scheme through which 
all boys are encouraged to take part 
in sports — not merely those athletes 
who are sure of a place on the 
4 team," but the hoy of average or 
less than average development, who 
at present has little to incite him to 
go into athletics. 



PRESIDENT AT CONFERENCE. 

An important agricultural confer- 
ence was held Saturday aftcrnoou at 
the Prince (ieorge hotel. New York 
city, to discuss plans for the organ- 
ization of a movement for rural l>et- 
terment. Three of the members of 
Col. Roosevelt's country life com- 
mission were present, including Pres. 
Kenvon L. Butterlield, Dean L. II 
Bailey of the school of agriculture. 
Cornell, and C B. Barrett of the na- 
tional farmer-' union. Others pi 
00f were Prof. T N. Carver of Har- 
vard. DOOM BOOJOM Davenport of 
the university of Illinois, and Dr. 
Clarence J. Owens managing director 
of the Southern commercial congrOOO. 



';i7. — The Hth annual report of 
the Massachusetts experiment station 
contains two articles, in all 'id pages, 
in which Philip II. Smith is joint 
author with .1. B. Lindsey 'H3. One 
00 "Types of Corn Suited to Massa- 
chusetts Conditions" is based on the 
results of experiments which have 
been enrried on at the station sin< •<■ 
1808. The other article, "Th<- 
Digestibility of Cattle Foods," con- 
tains a report of the digestion of 
various stock feeds and forages. 















The College Signal, Tuesday, December io* 191 2. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

The new standing in tin- Si<;nai. 
competition gives the largest bJM! 
increase in points to the sophomore 
competitors. The largest individual 
increase of credits has been made by 
Draper, L K. Smith ranking second, 
and Clay third. The individual work 
of best quality has been done by a 
member of the junior class. The 
sophomore class has submitted the 
greatest amount of carefully pre- 
pared work. The freshmen hnve 
made the poorest comparative show- 
ing since the last tabulation of 
points. In a number of cases, com- 
petitors have the greater part of their 
eligibility work to do between the 
present issue and the middle of 
March. 

Total Ponm, lb. . 10, Itlt. 
1014, 
I,. B. Smith, 10..0 

Clav , 



Russell, 
Hogg, 

Huell, 

Draper, 

McLain, 

Callaid. 

I'endletou, 



lyio. 



u»n; 



( urtin. 

Rogers, 

Harnxk^, 

Chamberlain, 

Hulsizer, 



9.4 
3.8 
.5 

li.0 

11. 'J 
8.52 
M.16 
8.9 

1K.1M 

1 l.ftl 

3.45 
3.22 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communication* to the SMHMl concerning, 
matters of fteneral interest aie welcomed. The 
Sii.nai. is not to ba held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

■BOOM Of The Collboe Sigxal: — 

Dear Sir* 1 

May 1 be permitted to use a bit of 
your rateable space with a word rela- 
tive to the reorganization of the 
Senate? Since this scheme was 
first hatched between President Hut- 
terfield and myself, I am much inter- 
ested in its adoption, though it is to 
be expected that lengthy considei a- 
tion and broader inspection will have 
changed its details, from those tirst 
formulated, for the better. 

In your editorial column of the last 
issue, you advocate no change, stating 
that the existing student government 
at M. A. C. is O. K. I would 
doubt this. It was far from sufficient 
in my day and I doubt if beneficial 
changes have been made to render it 
so today. 

What is the purpose of the Senate ? 
Is it only to act as an interclass 
judiciary? It should be the instiga- 
tor and ''backer" of every movement 
for the betterment of student condi- 
tions, social, fraternal, political, 
religious and athletic at M. A. C, 
and in all these be in harmony with 
the faculty. 

Are the student activities today 
run in harmony with each other and 
democratically for all the students? 
Where do the non-fraternity men 



"fit" in the management of the 
informals, the healthiest social insti- 
tution we have? Only in helping to 
pay the bills if debt is incurred 

In interclass discussions of the 
Senate where the two lower classes 
are concerned, how are these repre- 
sented? Only by partisan feeling of 
their foster-father members, which 
feeling frequently renders the Senate 
helpless and useless. 

The Senate should be the go- 
between in questions arising between 
all the students and student organiza- 
tions, and the faculty. To under- 
standing^ perform this duty, would 
it not be well to have all the students 
and all the organizations represented 
thereon? 

The fraternity political question is 
always a perilous one to discuss, yet 
is there not a definite relation between 
all the students collectively and all 
the fraternities? Should not both be 
working in unison for a better M. A. 
C. ? A fraternity conference can, at 
best, make only a gentlemen's agree- 
ment, and if violated, can enforce no 
action against the offender. Since 
the "rushing" rules do concern nil 
the students, particularly aU the 
freshmen, they should be made by I 
student governiug Inxly and could 
thereby be enforced. 

Fraternities, being politically- 
powerful groups of students, will 
always have their members elected to 
student offices. The non-fraternity 
men, being unorganized, will not be 
so fortunate. Yet does not the 
Senate represent ail rj£ Why not then 
. »sure the non-frat man representa- 
tion : 

I like to think of the Senate of the 
future as a live body, ever formulat- 
ing new ideas, ever striving to create 
better fellowship between students, 
and a more etHcieut student organiza- 
tion. I dislike to think that the Sen- 
ate is a council whose only duty lies in 
disposing of the business it "finds to 
do." If one used only the money he 
Jinds, he would spend his days in the 
poorhouse. One must be ever creat- 
ing, watching to do things better and 
more elHciently. It is such a Senate 
what I believe is needed at M. A. C 
One that shall understanding^ handle 
all the business of student govern- 
ment and develop every phase of 
student life. To do this it should be 
sufficiently representative. It is not 
#0 now. 

While the proposed plan may not 
be perfect, I hope it will be adopted 
in a judiciously, amended form. 

For the best interests of our Alma 
Mater, I remain 

Sincerely yours, 
Herbert W. Blaney 'It. 



WHILE THEY LAST 

IP-TO - DATE TAN SHOES 

ONLY $3.00 

We carry the largest stock of COLLEGE 

FOOTWEAR east of New York. 

'♦ Going Some" 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.'. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Retieonable Hntea 



•XI IV«. AI.IHCX 
House Next to Laundry. 



Fill I Winter Soils 4 Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order & Ready to Wear Suits 

Latest Styles 
inMackinaws 



E. B DICKINSON D. D S. 

DBNT AL, ROOM® 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 

IMolU A.M. l.UOtoSP.M. 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Bostoi, Mm. 

H. B. WHITE 'IS. Agent 

10 Allen S treat 



The sophomore class at a recent 
meeting decided to lery a tax for the 
support of a basketball team. Prac- 
tice will begin soon, and as good a 
team will be turned out as last year. 
Several games with outside teams will 
probably be played, some of these 
being played in the drill hall. 



Candy for Christmas ! ! 



Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without candy. Of course you 
want the best and you want to buy it at the right price. We have 
just received a fresh shipment of daintily boxed delicious candy. 
Our assortment of Christmas candies is so varied in style and price 
that it must appeal to the discriminating taste and satisfy the most 
limited purse. You will find just the candy you want at our store. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

The RGXAI.1V Store on **»•> o o»w«- 



The College Signal, Toesday, December 10, 191a. 



REV. DR. FOOTE IN CHAPEL 

Rev. Henry W. Foote of the 
department of education of the 
American Unitarian association ad- 
dressed the student body Sunday 
morning on "The aims of higher 
education." 

He said in part: "Our system of 
higher education in this country occu- 
pies a unique position in the world's 
social history and is only duplicated 
in one or two foreign countries. For 
many centimes, education in England 
has been considered as a birthright of 
the aristocracy and little effort has 
been made to reach the lower classes. 
In the United States, higher education 
is open to all who will avail them- 
x-lves of the opportunity. What is 
the purpose of this liberal system ? 
The aim of our educatiors is not only 
to train young people for greater suc- 
cess in life, Increase fortunes or 
greater ease and happiness. The 
purpose is of an idealistic nature and 
tends to promote a broader vision of 
life and a greater seuse of service. 
"Men of the broader vision are not 
only enabled to observe carefully the 
greet things of life but are capable of 
interpreting their observations in 
t.rms of every day life- Herein lies 
the success of the renowned men of 
the professions and of the sciences. 
While we may not all be able to bring 
a great gift to the world or to gain a 
wide reputation, we can all, at least fos- 
ter the spirit of the broader vision and 



try to serve our country and our fel- 
low men and make the world a better 
place for man to inhabit." 




Cbc 
Pheasant 

Bmm> St.. 
Bmbcrat 

Telephone 470 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHION 
AFTERNOON TEA 

Dinner if arranged for. 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACKINAWS 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C STOR E 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANDY TONIC 



Eld ridge '14 



Rendall '16 








Many of the world's 
greatest scholars say 
tnat good tobacco 
helps the mind to 
focus its faculties. If 
that is true, where 
could you find a more 
delightful aid to con- 
centration than 





Made of tender mid- 
dle leaves, to which 
long aging has given 
a temptingly satisfy- 
ing flavor and a vel- 
vety mellowness that 
wooes you r senses and 
smoothes out the 
wrinklesof your brain. 



J^^^^^Oc 



The Fall season is the Sweater time of the year. The Football 
games call for Mackinaws and Sweaters. \V«- are showing the 
best styles of the best makers. No fancy prices in this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50. $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

School and Colkge Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5> C.n.er S... »°'*™Z™»™ H ^ eyt M 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the l>est skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 






WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



l.'l.l.'QI # J 1 9' n,n» 



FOUNTAIN PEN 
Minimize your fountain pen 

+- troubles by owninft a Moore s. C It Is the 

^^eat,7oundeHtand most *^£^fi££k 

f[ Its strength lies In Its very simplicity. Nothing 

finikytoftet "out of order. C You can ft ve your- ^ 

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For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adam., Mint & Fo.«er. ^"»"* **■';, ASS &« 
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*W~aX)- 






The Collage Signal, Tuesday, December 10, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 10, 191s. 



T HE COL LEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. H.VANZWALF.NBURG '^Editor in Chief 
CH ESTER E.WIIKKLF.R'u.ManstKinjrEditor 
OSCAR O. ANDERSON *i% Assistant Editor 
FREDERICK D. GRIf.fJS '13. Athletic Editor 



8. MILLER JORDAN '13, 
HARRY \V. ALLEN '13. 
STUART B.FOSTER '14. 
F.RVINE F. PARKER '14 
HAROLD C. BLACK '14. 
J. ALBERT PRICE'iS 



Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

(/impus Editor 

Alumni Kditor 

Department Editor 

Associate Kditor 



GEORGE B. DONNEI.L '15. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

GEORGE ZA BRISK IE. *d. '13. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLARK. |R.'i4.Asst.Bus.Manager 
ERNEST F. l'PTON'14. Asst. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH *t%. Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per vear. Single 
copies. S cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 



a* matter at the Amherst 



Vol. XXIII. Tuesday, Df.c. io. No. m 



Real answers to President Butter- 
field's arguments against extend- 
ing the Prom season have nut yet 
been brought to light in spite of con- 
siderable heated diseussion and im- 
passioned junior oratory. 



With the season of holiday-giving 
so near at hand the appearance of the 
Nineteeu-fourteen Index during the 
coming week will seem like a neat 
coincidence. Hut that is where we 
figure without the wily manager of 
the publication. No recent class 
year-l>ook here has been published 
without a deficit or at least terrific 
effort on the part of the liook's man- 
agers, and any seasonal advantage 
that may offer itself to a manager is 
greedily snapped up. The ludrx is 
a volume that will lie worth the price, 
it is a hook that you will one day 
wish you had in your tiookcsse. 
Will it lessen your satisfaction in the 
slightest when you have purchased 
the book, to realize that you have 
■BffOrtsd a campus activity which is 
doing, in its way, as much to advance 
the College as are athletics? 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Signal Office or handed to Stuart B Foster 
14, on or before Saturday preceeding each issue. 1 

Dec. 1 1 — 1 -:*►<> v. m., Asseuihlv. 
l*rof. George B. Churchill, 
Amherst college. 

Dec. 12—6-45 v. m., M. A. C. C. A. 

chapel. 
l,,. c . 14— 1NFOHMAL, Drill hall. 
Dec. tl — •"■la" a. M., Chapel, Hev. 

Allen Q. Stockdale of Boston. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Theta Chi held its initiation ban- 
quet at the Prospect house, Friday 
night. 

A large number of track candi- 
dates reported to Manager Cooper 
last week. 

Carl Raymond Frye '14 of South 
Hartley Falls, has plertgert Kappa 
Gamma Phi. 



Kappa Gamma Phi helrt its initia- 
tion banquet at the Amherst house 
Saturday night. 

The freshmen have qualified as 
entertainers. We would have some 
more of the same. 

Klvin L Quaife of the faculty has 
pledged an honorary member of the 
Beta Kappa Phi fraternity. 

Inhabitants of the "dorms" slaked 
thi'ir thirst with sophomore cider 
after the show Saturday night. 

The annual initiation banquet of 
Phi Sigma Kappa was held at the 
Draper in "Hamp" on Friday night. 

The C. S. C. fraternity held its 
initiation banquet at the Rose Tree 
Inn in Northampton Saturday night. 

Judging from the artistic surround- 
ings of the hockey shelter, those 
•• landscapes" must learn something 
after all. 

Professor Waugh gave the second 
of his talks on photography to the 
Landscape club on Tuesday evening 
at their meeting. 

Have you got the price of an Index 
listed away in your jeans? Hang 
on to it, those greenbacks will be 
useful in a few days. 

After the football season closes it 
seems an easy matter to gather two 
or three teams of men who will play 
football for hours at a time. 

I'nder the auspices of the Chris- 
tian association three boys' clubs 
were organized Friday evening. The 
evening was given up to games in the 
drill hall. 

Last Tuesday night at the meeting 
of the Stockbridge club the represen- 
tatives of the apple and corn judging 
teams spoke to the club, on their trip 
to Boston. 

During the Thanksgiving recess, 
the wires for the lights on the hockey 
rink were strung up and everyone is 
now patiently waiting for cold weather 
and good ice. 

Instruction in the art of juggling 
a tray without spilling the contents 
should be given the waiters. Hoard 
might lie cheaper if the crockery were 
not so fragile. 

Track practice started Friday 
under Captain Whitney and will be 
of a light nature until after the Chi st- 
ums vacation. Few reported the 
first night but another week will 
probably see more candidates out. 

The Technical high rifle team of 
Springfield has received a reply from 
the college rifle club, to the effect 
that the second team is willing to 
shoot a match with the "tech" boys 
on the 1Mb. It will be the first 
match for both clubs. 

The first Mettewampe trek of the 
winter season took place Saturday 
nnder the leadership of Mr. Harrison. 
The route taken was from the end of 
the Pelham car line following Orient 
Springs brook for a distance and 
then a return to the car line by road. 

A number of those men interested 
in snow-shoeing got together after 



diapel Friday morning and laid the 
foundations for a sort of winter 
sports organization. Active work 
will begin after the Christmas recess, 
and it is hoped that enough interest 
will be taken in the project to incor- 
porate it among the regular student 
activities. 



We Carry the Largest Line 



OF — 



»10. — S. W. Menduin is working 
for a master's degree in farm man- 
agement at the university of Wis- 
consin, address, 312 N. Mills St., 
Madison, Wis. 



Academy 
of Music. 



WEEK OF DECEMBER 9 




The Nonnampion Players 



IN 



"The White Sister" 

By Marion Crawford 

EVERY EVENING »T 8:00 

Price* 25c. 50c and 71c 



Wed. and Saf. Mats, at 2:15 

Prices 2*c and SOc 



College Shoes 

Of any store in the state outside of 
Boston 



MODERN REPAIRING DEFT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Cookp's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



Write Ideas for Moving Picture Plays ! 



"XTfWT CAN WRITE PHOTO PLAYS AND 
IUU EARN $25.00 OR MORE WEEKLY 

We Will Show You How ! 

If you have ideas — if you can think — we will show you the secrets 
of this fascinating new profession. Positively no experience or literary 
excellence necessary. No " flowery language " is wanted. 

The demand for photo plays is practically unlimited. The big film 
manufacturers are " moving heaven and earth " in their attempts to get 
enough good plots to supply the ever increasing demand. They are 
offering jiioo and more, for single scenarios, or written ideas. 

We have received many letters ftom the film manufacturers, such as 
VITAGRAPH, EDISON, ESSANAY, LUBIN, SOLAX. IMP, REX, 
RELIANCE, CHAMPION, COMET, MELIES, ETC., urging us to 
send photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets of success. 

We are selling photo plays written by people who " never 
before wrote a line for publication." 

Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
good idea every week, and will write it out as directed by us, and it 
sells for only $25, a low figure, 

Yon Will Earn $100 Monthly For Spare Time Work. 

TTi-DTjiTp SEND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AT ONCE FOR FREE COPY OF 
JS XliliHj OUR ILLUSTRATED BOOK, " MOVING PICTURE PLAYNRITIN8 " 

Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what this 
new profession may mean for you and your future. 



NATIONAL AUTHORS' 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



INDEX NEWS. 

Now that the Index is so neur at 
hand, be sure to hang on to that 
•two-spot." It will be worth many 
times the price, for it will have a 
record of all the things which you 
remenbtr, (in a way.) but can't re- 
call. It will contain line photos, and 
lots of them. You will pay one 
"boat" ft* ■ little calendar, contain- 
ing only a few pictures which in a few 
months or years will mean absolutely 
nothing because there is no word of 
explanation accompanying them, 
while for twice that amount you can 
get an Imlr.r containing many times 
the number of picture*, while at the 
-;inie time you get histories, knocks, 
-tatistics, and many other interesting 
things. 



Bi economical for a week and In- 
ready to hand the money over next 
week in exchange for a volume which 
vou will be proud to show to all your 
friends in other institutions as a pro- 
duct of your college. 



luting a national policy with respect 
to agriculture. 

E. L. Hsieh, who mm graduated 

froniM. A.C. in I909aad subsecpient- 
ly pursued graduate study at Cornell 
university, is chief of the bureau of 
interpretation in the same depart- 
ment with Liang; his work is chietly 
that of translating into the native 
language the experiment -tation bul- 
letins and other literature pertaining 
to agriculture, which comes to him 
from foreign countries. Ilsieh repre- 
sented the Chinese republic at the 
international dry fanning congress 
which was held in Alberta. Canada, 
in October. 1912. 

H. Jen. also a graduate of the 
class of 1909, is director of the ag- 
ricultural experiment station of the 
province of Mukden, Manchuria. 

These men represent one of the 
types of leadership for which the 
M:is>:ichusetts agricultural College 
endeavors to train its students. 



HOCKEY NOTES 

The last Dean's Saturday renders 
only two men of the large hockey 
-juad ineligible. All of l«st year's 
men both regulars and substitutes 
11. qualified to play. This is a bet- 
ter start than was made last year 
when so many of the regular men 
were ineligible. 

The first game, after the Christmas 
tiip, will be with Holy Cross, Jan. 
1 1 . The remainder of the schedule 
is in doubt as yet, owing to the delay 
in making out the New England in- 
tercollegiate league schedule. 

The hockey house has received the 
finishing touches to render it accept- 
able to the landscape department, in 
the shape of newly planted Scotch 



nines. 



CHINESE GRADUATES FROM 

THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRI 

CULTURAL COLLEGE. 

During the past few years four 
( hinese students have been graduated 
from the Massachusetl- agricultural 
College, One of them, 1). Y. Lin 
was graduated in Itlt, is now a 
-tin lent at Yale Forestry School 
where he is preparing himself for 
ice as an expert forester in 
lii> own eountrv ; Lin is a brilliant 
slu. lent of large ability and he is 
sure to occupy an important position 
in the new republic of China when 
he completes his academic education 
in America. 

The other three have already re- 
turned to their home land and are em- 
ployed in high offices of trust an.l 
responsibility in the department of 
■ ulture which, under the now 
form of government, will receive 
attention than formerly. L. K- 
L _r, a graduate of the Massachu- 
agricultural College in 1909, 
- •> 11 appointed vice-minister of 
agr, ulture and forestry, and together 
with his chief is engaged in formu- 



POSTPONED JOY AWAITS THE 
STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

The Stockbridge club's night of 
festivity postponed from last month 
will be celebrated with due ceremony 
Tuesday, Dec. 17. in the social 
union room. The committee indig- 
nantly denies that refreshments will 
be on tap but state* that there will bi 
something to eat. The speakers will 
try to cause as little trouble as |»osai- 
l.le. Everyone is invited ; bring 
vour familv. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

EXTKN-K'N. 

Mr. Story has been in Chicago the 
p-ist week attending the International 
live stock association held in that 
city. 

The first extension school of tin- 
year was held the past week in Ash- 
lield. It was the most successful of 
its kind ever held in this state. 

The extension service through the 
department of pomology will offer a 
one week's school of apple packing 
from Jan. 18 to Jan. .Tl. 1919. 

The packing school will be under 
the personal direction of I'rof. K. C. 
Scars. The instruction in packing 
will be given by Mr. H. W. K. . >. < \ 
tension instructor in pomology, who 
an had large experience in box junk- 
ing in Oregon. 

The work will consist in grading 
apples for the various kinds of mar- 
ket, packing in boxes, fancy pack- 
| and barrels. 

Special lectures and demonstrations 
will be arranged for those who at- 
tend, on such subjects as: selecting 
orchard sites, planting, fertilizing, 
pruning, spraying, markets and mar- 
keting. 

I.ANUM APK. 

The landscape department is en- 
gaged in I work of general civic im- 
provement at Ilardwick, (ulley '18 
and Hartley '18 have made surveys 
and are now engaged in re-planning 
aud working over the town common. 



Potatoes That "Ate Good" 



A FRIEND WROTE US "Many potatoes yield Urge, 

look fine, but eat poor.'' In Ottl Potato Contest just 
completed, there were many crops which yielded large, looked 
fine and "ate good, (Of the pri/es were .iwaidrd on .1 SOsJc 
of points which considered quality SS well as quantity, and 
some who had quantity fell below these who had quality. 
There were 

18 Crops over 300 bushels per acre ; 
11 of them were over 400 bushels per acre, and 
3 of them yielded over 500 bushels per acre. 

The Census gives 148 bushels as the average yield for New I aglaod 
and 94 bushels for the whole country. The average yirld in this 
. osteal <3l seres) is 3347" bushels per acre. 

\\V shall publish a tabulated statement of r»-sult* with the methods employed; 
AIM .. i..|.\ ot the KOta cards showing the so. ring and the method "I KOfia*. 
\ study "• tSeaa tabUl ami thuds i fc a w td prove tnteiestinK and institutive. 

VV« -I. ..II lx" happy to mail a iop> t 






BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimefs 
Fine Clothes 




FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 







That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C & K. 

CAMPION, Sole Auont. 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked hit. 

DRESS SUITS 

We make them all and make them right at 




3VL 



Collcm' Storei 













The College Signal, Tuesday, December 10, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 10, 1912. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Urass I'ine, Valves 
and FittiiiKs l<" >team, Water and CJaV Asbestos 
and Magnesia BoiIm and Hi,* Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Sup-lies. Engireeis and 
Contractors for Steam and Mot Water Heating, 
Automatic sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kngue 
Connections. • Holyoke. M«»». 



theTeachers Exchange 

Of Boston lao Boy lit on St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



A new walk is being laved out from the agricultural service bureau of the 
MM ravine to the poultry department American agricultural chemical com- 
pany of New York and Boston. His 
home address 111 Grand Avenue, 



"arptrvter & Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1. Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash BlocK, Amherst 

H. M. Rogers, '15. 

Studio Phone 303-2 



Kokers, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

, ^ — — ___ standard ol Excellence for over 50 Years | 1 *> I li 

QUALITY that means ECONOMY 

Every Farmer should study Efficiency and Economy in the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer ; but it Does Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount of the Kight Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER 10 ""<t the requirements 
of every crop on every hind Of SOil. Our experts (who are 
practical farmers) will be glad to assist you in making your selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Values than are 
the Host Expert Chemists. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FRANK COE BRANDS This Year 

Beware of those fertilizers whose only commendation is a "cut" in price. 
This is an admission of one of I WO things— either they have been tOO 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, .nfenor 
materials. 

said the late Prof. Voorhees, when Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station :-" The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends sot so Braes upon what is paid for it, as upon the 
character of the materiab used to maKe it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty years' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be ■ just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will be 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 

51 CHAMBERS STREET NEW YORK CITY 



hv the department. 

Mr. Harrison tad the junior class 
in landscape gardening are making 
special surveys of the ravine with 
view to an out-of-door amphitheater. 

The last issue of flat* and Ceme- 
t, n/ published in Chicago and recog- 
nized as the leading magazine of 
lasjdseapa gardening in America has 
a long and elaborate illustrated 
report on the new plans for the 
Massachusetts agricultural College 
grounds. 

MIUTAKY UKPAKTMKNT. 

A small pamphlet, "Rifle practice 
in institutions of learning" has 
reeently been issued by the national 
Loan! foi the promotion of rifle 
practice of the War department and 
hat betfl Stai to high schools and 
eolleges of the country. The poliey 
of the board is set forth and statistics 
ETC cited to prove the undoubted ben- 
Hits to the country of rifle practice in 
secondary schools. Special attention 
is called to the fact that the move- 
ment is not part of any scheme to 
promote militarism and the promo- 
tion of patriotism is emphasized. 
Educators throughout the country are 
called upon to investigate the pro- 
paganda and give it their support. 

PAIKVIV.. 

The dairy building is progressing 
now and Hearing completion. 
Professor Lock wood hopes to have 
the building in full operation Jan. 1. 

I.IHK.Vin . 

Among the new l>ooks received at 
thr library are:— Agar's "Garden 
Design". Bryan's "Poems of Coun- 
try Life", ibirke's "Origin of Life", 
(omstock's "The spider Book", 
Klliott's " Important Timber Trees of 
the I. S", Fowler's "How to Save 
Money", Kirkham's "Outdoor Philos- 
ophy", Low's "Tin- A meriean People", 
O' Kane's "Injurious Insects", Perry's 
"Wider I'se of the Sehool Plant". 
Powell's '-Chrysanthemums", Rogers' 
••(iarden Planning", ResenanVMilk 
(Question", Smith's "Profitable Cul- 
ture of Vegetables" Tennyson's "A 
Memoir of Ix>rd Tennyson". Valen- 
tine's "Beginners in Poultry" 
Ychlen's Theory of the leisure 
(lass". Wheeler's "Profitable Breeds 
of Poultry" and Wilson's "Working 
One's Way Through College." 



Newton Centre and his business 
office is at M State Street, room 52. 
Boston. 

'97. ^-C. F. Palmer, supervisor of 
the gardening department of the Los 
Angeles schools, has recently been 
elected president of the Southwest 
order of the American association 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 




MASSACHUSETTS NORTHERN ST. RY. CO. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'*2. — George D. Howe has changed 
his permanent address from 18 Win- 
ter street, Bangor, Maine to :*8 
Whittier avenue, Springfield. Mr. 
Howe is a special representative for 
Libhv. McNeill & Libby of Chicago 
for Connecticut and Western Massa- Mining Stocks or anyth.ng else, 

shusetts with headquarters at Hart- write me and learn how he can nvdee 
ford, Conn. $100 a month without making tny 

•«:!._ Dr. II. J. Wheeler for over | investment but his time to write 
20 vears connected with the Rhode 



WANTED ! 



Anyone who has ever sold Books, 
Typewriters, Insurance, Collier's 



Island State college and experiment 
station, for ten years as director of 
the station, has become manager of 



JOHN W. TALBOT, 

South Bend, Ind. 



D E L AVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



is as much superior to other sepa- 
rators as other separators are to 
gravity setting methods. Why go 
but "half-way" when buying a 
separator? Why not insure satis- 
faction by getting a DE LAVAL? 




THE DE LVMl SEPARATOR CO. 



Its 167 BriMKlwar. 
New York. 



tu K. MaiiUon St., 
Chicago. 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

Don*t I^orjcct 

That we are carrying a good line of 
— Tobaooo 



for advancement of agricultural 
teaching. This association is com- 
posed of teachers of agriculture of 
the states of California and Nevada. 

'00. — F. Howard Brown is secre- 
tary of the Massachusetts fruit grow- 
ers' association which recently held a 
fruit show at Boston. He states that 
most of the first class in apple pack- 
ing to represeut the College attended 
the fruit show and many were exhib- 
itors and prize winners. 

'05.— F. A. Bartlett of Stamford, 
Conn., is in Roswell,New Mexico on 
business. 

'05. — H. F. Tompson has gone to 
New Brunswick. New Jersey to teach 
during the winter short courses. 

»07. — Arthur W. Higgins is selling 
fertilizers this winter. 

'OH. — F. A. Johnston, recently 
published a bulletin on insects affect- 
ing vegetables. It is listed as Bui. 
109 Pt. V, Bur. of Eut. 

*08. — A son, Charles Douglas 
ID slop, was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
James A. Hvslop ou Nov. in. 

'10.— II. T. Cowles, who was last 
year principal of the AfSSttM high 
school is now superintendent of 
schools for the Kio (J rand district. 
with his headquarters at Rio Orande, 
Porto Rico. There are 4* schools in 
the two municipalities, scattered over 
the mountains and along the sea- 
shore. 



•II. — A. P. Burnley has completed 
one job of landscape work at To- 
ronto and is now with W. II. Man- 
ning's force at Akron, Ohio. 

'11.— E. L. Winn of Elizabeth, 

N. J. was I Sliest at the Amherst 
house for Thanksgiving day and the 
remainder of the week. 

ninkiki:n-twki.\ i - 
The class letter will be out 
in January. Contributions are in 
order. Send same to Francis S. 
Madison, class secretary. East 
Ore onwich. R.I. Don't fail to write. 
Rai.imi R. Pakkkk. Pies. 

'12. — Ray E. Torrev is professor 
of biology at GrTOTC City college. 
QfOTC ( ity. Pa. 

'12. — Thomas llemenway's addres 
is now. The Cables, West Palm 
Beach, Fla. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



Wantkk: A j_ r I serviceable Am- 

hcrstonian run for the Hockey BoSSS, 
Donor will receive the thanks of 
the entile hockey squad. (Juick 
action necessary. Specifications as 
regards the rug have just been re- 
ceived from the landscape deparment : 
Rug Uiiental: size txlf, color, 
dark green, flaked with maroon to 
harmonize with the exterior of the 
House; must be dainty, but sturdy 
and serviceable. Pei order I.iind- 
SSSB4 department. 



BIRDSALl 13 



FARRER 15 



k.tabi. ia.Bi> intra 

Stjjphbn Lane Folokh 

MAMKAITirHIMI JKWKI.KH 

1HO BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

OL.UI» AMI COFil.KliK 

PINS AND RINUH •* 

<..>!.!>. tlLVRK AMD BHONZR MWOAlJo 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



1 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 




Vanity Show Rehearsal 

He's glad to shake that lady 
"business" and get back to his 
Fatima. 

60 FmUmo emmtont trill memn a uhl* tatln 
pllioit top. 24 In. HHiii decorated with hand- 
tommh polnttit (low*— 12 d—ignt to tekcl/rom. 



jfyjOtV^sUtJUmmmCU 



"Distinctively 
Individual" 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR KXPENSKS Kn.ble us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 

COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Mikirt 

if 



CAP A GOWNS 



To the American College* from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



>7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Ctos$d only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Toefll Mientka 

Shoes Sinned and PolisHed 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open Band*) Main Nt. 

On way to P«»t Office. 









'I 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 10, 19*'- 



PLAYING 



CARDS 




The Massachusetts AralturalColta 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLBGK JEWM.KY 

V.olin. Banjo. Mandolin and (iuitar String, 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



DRUG STORE 



Ainlierat, MWMN 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Economic Entomology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST, MASS. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone W-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

p. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, • 
Lead Lights, &c. 
ft Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



<WrlftZl*t «S8 Dlt-»on 

Catalogues of 

Ktill «e Winter Gootl- 

Are out Copy mailed to any address. Collar 
student's and Athletes who want Jhe real, superior 
Trucks for the various sports should insist upon 
?ho«be«i..R the Wright& Ditson 1 rade Mark. 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



1015c 

2 1-2C 
2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Stiam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

Ralph I. ■••MM, A*ent, 7 North Cottage 
Ki>wari. C. EnwAHlis, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see our assort 
ment of pennants and banners 

CI KR AN & DYER, Props. 



Athletic Hoard, 
The College Senate, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 

Hoc-key Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Bitle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Niueteeu Hundred Fourteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

BUM kbridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 
F. 1). Griggs, Piesideut 
S. B. Freeborn, Manager 
L. Edgar Smith, Manager 
E. H. Cooper, Manager 
W. S. Little, Manager 
C. Bokelund, Manager 
J. W. T. i.esure. Secretary 
Harold F. .lones, Manager 
J. I). French, Manager 
O. «.. Anderson, Manager 
E. S. Clark, dr.. Manager 
L. (i. Davies, President 
J. L. Mayer, President 
W. S. Little, President 
A. F. McDougall, President 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

Wright & Ditson Goods are the Mandard for 

all sports 

WMIGHT .v DITMON 

*4 Washington st.. Boston, Mass. 

~ Hit TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

yulrke.t Mrvlce. H*.t Work. Low.H Vriv, 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivwed Oents' overcoats, tents, pants and 
coats Ladies' hne linen suitt a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Ttl. No. 34i-« 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



CARS 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
camations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Oentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock EVEKV night 
Corner Amity and Ple»»»nt Street* 



If you want to be 

IOUI WITH THK GIRLS 

you must have jour clothe, pressed and cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 

11 Amity St. M * roon Store 

Pren»tnir and Cleaning a specialty 

preening ami w^ gji^ Ucket gy#tem , n tomti 

Tel. 303-II 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 «n<l 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

SpecUl Car* at ReaaonaW* Rata* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. If. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit Th « un ' e 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 

Makers of •* Gold Medal Uniforms. ' 

1404-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLOENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowle> 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATE 

The Republican gives the best r»porti« 
Agricultural College and Amherst 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %* WmUy *'• 



THE COLLEGE 



I MRAT. V 



y 1912 




\a\t\ 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 17, 1912. 



No. 13 



TRACK HEN WORK OUT [ OVER EIGHTY COUPLES LONG DRAMATIC TRIP HOCKEY SCHEDULE OUT 



Preliminary Announcement of Schedule At Second Informal. Many Visiting 



Includes Meet with Amherst. 

Although the track season is less 
than two weeks old, over M men 
have already come out for the team 
:md prospects IN bright for a stic- 
kful season. Captain Whitney is 
the only varsity man left, but last 
r's subs are showing up well and 
there seems to be good material in 
the freshman class. 




Cap 1. F. W. Whiinkv 



£ "a 






1 



The practice thus far has been 
light, and has aimed chiefly at get- 
ting the men accustomed to running 
on Ixmrds. After Christmas, how- 
ever, Coach Lawrence Dickinson '10, 
will bi on hand to take charge, and 
hard work will be in order. Especial 
attention will be paid to turning c< li- 
ners and running the regulation 190 
yards, in preparation for the B.A.A. 
. which comes on Feb. 6. 
While the schedule is tentative as 
it can be said that much more 
will be attempted than ever before. 
I hie mt'i -ts will l»e attended, the 
B. A. A., Columbia and probably 
Providence instead of Hartford, as 
year. Manager Cooper has not 
MM to terms with SB* ..liege 
in indoor dual meet, but he hopes 
arrange a date shortly for a dual 
t at home. An outdoor meet has 
1 scheduled with Amherst college 
\pril M, 
Among those out for the team 



Quests Present. 

The second Informal of the year 
held Saturday at the Drill hall was . 
largely attended and was a great 
success. The hall was tastefully 
decorated with the maroon streamers 
and pennants while an increased 
number of palms and fernn put M 
the finishing touches. Music was 
furnished by the college orchestra 
and was voted a great success not 
only for the quality of the music but 
I also for the fact that their time was 
'excellent. The patronesses were 
Mrs. Carmen of Smith, Mrs. Khode- 
house of Ml. Ilolyoke and Mis. 
Oman sad Mrs. Duncan of M. A.C. 
Over HO couples were present among 
whom were : 

11113— Klls. Murray, Huntington, 
1). F. Baker, Harris, Hnsey, Ander- 
son, Howe. Drury, .Ionian, Baird. 
Samson. Forhush, Adams, Cooper. 
Mallet, Edminster, Uoehrs, L»wry. 
i. Ilvland. A. .1. Kellev, Walker. 
Mayer. Cole, < hristmaii. Bursley. 
l'.M I IVtc-rs. C. M Allen. NIs- 
T W. Vi-olet. I lien*. lo«ter 

aks, I- . . Davlea, Jones, Ed- 
it, Brown, Kdgert4»n. 

1 '. »!.-»— Archibald, Griggs, Baird. 
.1. K Harper, Bogers, Hotis, llil- 
dreth, Perry. 

HO 6— Taylor, Blanpicd, W. L 
Harris, Dunbar, Rogers, Tarbell. 
Reed, Pratt, Choate, Palmer, Burt, 
Fernald, Wheeler, McCulloch, Bishop. 
Rendall. 

Socials, post graduates and others 
—Dillon, 1L .1. Baker, H. N. Wil- 
lard, Ruprecht, Professors Quaife 
and Wattles, (I. C. Hurley, Iniver- 
sity of Vermont, R. H. (iale. New 
Hampshire State, J. E. Pearce, Har- 
iard. W. K. Clark, C. H. Westott 
of University of Maine, Hay* 
of Cornell, Wales '12, Tower '12, 
Parker '12, Goodiiough ex-' 13. 



JUNIOR 



TO 






I'M .".—Captain Whitney, Baker, 
IhrdsaU, Clark, Hutchings and 
awrj. 

1914— Lucas, Shirley, L. Ernest 
nth, W r arner and Wheeler. 
1015— Rhoades, Strauss, Patten 
1 Parker. 

l'.»l<;— Bradley, Dinsmore, Russell, 
Iuelli, Whitney, Kennedy, Jenna 
Mostrom. 



ANNUAL OUT 
MORROW 

If nothing happens the r.Hl Mi 
will make its appearance on the ca in- 
put* tomorrow morning at eight 
o'clock. It will M on sale at the 
Sk.nal office as usual, and later at 
the down-town drug stores. The 
! price of the volume will be two dot* 
' lars. In its attractive covers of blue 
! and gold, it will make a very excel- 
lent, gift book. Already mailorders 
are coming in for it from the alumni. 
Those who wish to obtain it in this 
way should communicate with the 
manager. E. S. Clark, Jr., at the 
1 college. 

Kappa Gamma Phi has moved into 
its new house on East Pleasant stre et. 



Begins Next Week. Eight Performan- 
ces in New York and New Jersey. 

A rather extensive schedule has 
been recently completed for the 
Christmas trip of tho Roister Dois- 
ters. The men will spend the first 
week of the recess at home and will 
start for New York Christmas night 
via the Fall Uiver Line. The tiist 
production will be given in llac ken- 
sack in the Oritani Club hall 
and in view of this fact, a large audi- 
ence is expected. The following 
muiiiing, Friday. Dec l'T. the men 
will trolley to Bnthcrford. N . .1., in 
order that this town may witness a 
performance the same evening in the 
( ity Hall auditorium. Kutherford 
audiences have a reputation for niiiii- 
Iwrs and enthusiasm which, judging 
from the success of Inst year's pro- 
duction, will doubtless be sustained. 
U.iday. the 2«th. tl, will 

journey to Richmond Hill, I»ng 
Island. Both a matinee and 

. -veiling performance will be 
ifv/an here under the ausp 
the Kiehmond Hill association. Sun- 
lay will lie speti, probably in dtVOBl 
ation »♦ tne New Tort 
churches. Monday morning the dub 
will again grace the Erie railroad as 
far as SufTern, N. Y. where the local 
Ugh school will handle the produc- 
tion. The following day M01. 
N. Y. will be visited and. M in Suf- 
fern. the high school will be respon- 
sible. 

New Year's day the cast will jump 
half the width of the Empire state to 
Binghamton, where the Y M < . A. 
will held a reception in eom.eetion 
with the performaii 

Leaving Binghamton at 10 oYl 
the morning of Jan. B, the Thespians 
will move on to Sidney, If. T. via 
the Delaware & Hudson railroad. 
Arrangements at Sidney are still 
p.-n-ling. but it is probable that tie- 
,! Country Club will handle tin- 
pnsluction. 

The last performance will occur at 
Worcester, N. V . on the morning of 
the third. The cast will leave Sidney 
at 11-12 a m. and will that evening 
perform at the W r ieting Opera lion- . 
Worcester. The following day the 
men will head for home where sleep 
will be the principal diversion until 
the return to college on dan »')th. 



West Point and Williams to be Met in 
Vacation. Harvard and Yale Later. 



The Massachusetts "Aggie"' hoc | 
team is fast rounding into shape for 
what promises to be a most Bliccc 
ful season. Manager Little has 
■tTtaged M e\cilh-iit schedule 
despite the dilliculty of dodging con- 
llicts with the dates of the inter, ol 
legiate league. The season will open 
away from home the latter part of 
the Christmas vacation, and will not 
close until well along in February. 
Everv one of the big colleges have 
MBfllMed a desire to arrange a game 
provided a suitable date can be found. 
Ibuvard and Vale are already 
scheduled and Dartmouth, Cornell 
and M. I T. are practically sure. 




CATT. J C. Hutchinson 

The first game of the year for the 
"Aggies" will be played against the 
Army at « Ml Point, N. Y. M Thurs- 
n. 2. Manager Little had a 
game scheduled with the ('resent A. 
I New York for the next day but 
thi> had to lie cancelled and MIT • 
game is pending with Syracuse for 
that date. On Saturday, Jan. 4th. 
Williams will lie played at Williams- 
town. 

The team is putting in two honrs a 

day practicing and already the men 

iN showing good form. Captain 

Hutchinson, "Del" .lones, Needham 

and Little are the only "M" men left 

fiom last year's star aggregation but 

Ellis, Johnson and Archibald of last 

' year's substitutes and Herb Brewer 

I who made his letter bis freshman 



At a recent meeting of the sopho- 
more class I). J. LcwiB was fleet. -d 
editor-in-chief of the Iflfi frtfftf, 
II. M. Bogers business manager and 
II. V. Marsh assistant business man- 
ager. Plans were made for sclect- 
1 ing the remainder of the board and 

business has already started for " the j ^^ flu . gh o(|t ft toam that ghows lots 
best Index yet." 



" 












I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 17, 191a. 












The College Signal, Tuesday, December 17, 191a. 



of promise. Besides these men 
there me several freshmen avail- 
able including Kernald and Chisholm 
who did good work against Williston 
on Saturday. 

Malinger Little's schedule is now 
nearly complete. The few open 
dates are iu the hands of the Boston 
arena management for games with 
Dartmouth. Cornell and M. I. T. at 
Boston. The schedule which has yet 
to receive the approval of the athletic 
board is as follows : 
Thursday. -Ian. _' | West Point at West 

Point, N. T. 

Friday, dan. .'! ; Syracuse at Syra- 
cuse, N. V. (peuding) 
Saturday, dan. I ; Williams at Wil- 

li:imstown. 
Wednesday. .Ian. 8 ; open. 
Saturday. .Ian. 1 1 ; Holy Cross at 

AmhciM. 
Wednesday, dan. 14; International 
Y. .M. ( . A. college at Am- 
herst. 
Saturday dan. 1* ; Amherst at Am- 
herst. 
Wednesday, .Jan. 22; Yale at New 

Haven, (pending) 
Saturday, dan. 15 J Harvard at Bot* 

ton. 
Saturday, Feb. 1 ; open. 
Wednesday, Feb. ."> : open. 

Friday, Feb. 7; BaaseaJeaf P. I. at 

Amherst. 

Saturday, Feb. * ; International Y. 
M. ('. A. college at Spring- 
field. 

Wednesday, Feb. 12 ; open. 

Friday, Feb. II ; open. 

Massachusetts I. T. at Amherst. 
(prom game) 



on Jan. 10th or 11th. In prepara- 
for this, daily practice will be held 
under the coaching of Lieut. Schreibcr 
of the Marine Corps, formerly coach 
at George Washington university. 
Four men of last year's team are 
missing and their absence will no 
doubt be felt in this year's shooting. 



SECONDS BEAT WILLISTON 

The Massachusetts "Aggie" sec- 
onds defeated Williston at hockey 
Saturday afternoon on the college 
rink in a rather loosely played game 
by a score of 6 to 1 . Williston was 
never dangerous and the fast work 
of the "Aggie" forwards kept them 
continually on the defense. The 
game was interesting despite the one- 
sidedness of the score. There was 
no rough work, both teams showed 
lack of practice on the ice and there 
were many resulting "spills." 

What little team work was in evi- 
dence was shown by the "Aggies." 
Johnson, Archibald, Fernald and 
Chisholm did good work in carrying 
the puck but then- was little attempt 
at passing. Fllis and Brewer had 
little or no chance |o show what they 
could do at goal for very few shots 
came their way. Williston's one 
goal cam.' in the second half when 
(iritlin managed to poke the puck in 
during a mix-up in front of the goal 
in which the defense got in Brewer's 
way. Captain Short of the visitor's 
was the only man of the opponeus 
who played a co .isteut game. Ti e 
line-up and score : 



WHILE THEY LAST 

UP-TO - DATE TAN SHOES 

ONLY $3.00 

Wc carry the largest stock of COLLEGE 

FOOTWEAR east of New York. 

•« Going Some" 

EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



THE 



RIFLE SEASON OPENS 
Indoor ritle shooting at M. A. C 
for the tflt-1918 season will be 
formally ushered in Unlay with the 
match between the Aggie second 
team ami the Springfield Technical 
high school. The Springfield team 
ranks high in interscholastic ritle cir- 
cles and a good match is expected. 
Out of the following sixteen men : 
ItlS, Neal, M. Ileadle, Brown; 
1914, Oertel, Dunbar, Nute ; WIft, 
I'pton, Macy, Lane, Donnel | 1916, 
Huntington, Laird, Taber, Wether- 
bee, Bowe, and Montgomery-Peter, 
ten will be chosen for the second team 
and of the ten firing only the five 
highest scores will count. Some line 
<»n the ability of these new men can 
be secured l>y this match and it it 
confidently expected that some var- 
sity material will show up. It has 
as vet not been decided whether the 
match will bt held on the Aggie range 
or upon the respective home ranges 
the scores being announced by 
telegraph. 

The Massachusetts schedule for 
the Eastern League of the National 
Intercollegiate association has not 
been received from the National Rifle 
association so that the date of the 
first shoot of the varsity riflemen is 
not known. In all probability, the 
first match will come at the end of the 
first week after the Christmas recess 



'■ \(.(.1KS. 

Kllis. Brewer, g 
Archibald, p 
Kisher, cp 

Sherinyan, Heffron, rw 
Chisholm, r 
Johnson, c 
Fernald, Iw 

Score — M Aggies " 6, Williston 1 
Goals -Chisholm 2, Johnson a, Fernald 
l, (iriflfin. Keferee— Hutchinson. Timers 
— Pellett and Walker. Time— 20 and 1 5- 
minute halves. 



WILLISTON. 

g, Nash, McGrath 

p, Devaney 

cp, Short 

rw, Cloery 

r, Spencer 

c, Hatten 

lw, (irtfin 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

I 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Noveltiea, 

Rings, Charms Pris«s. Trophies, 

Medal* College Pins, Fobs, Saala, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 



MKN. ALDBN 
House Next to Laundry. 



Fall k Winter Suits l Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order & Ready to Wear Suits 

Latest Styles 
inMackinaws 



ALUMNI BACK TO FRATERNITY 
BANQUETS 

Ab usual, quite a large number of 
out-of-town alumni have been back 
at college to attend the annual initia- 
tion banquets of their fraternity 
chapters which have been recently 
held in the vicinity of Amherst. 

Rev. Henry Hague of Worcester 
7*5 Barb«r< J. White ex-*87, of 
Hartford; Theodore S. Bacon of 
Springfield and Clifford 15. Thomp- 
son '07, of Perak, Malay, who is 
now visiting in this section and 
Langdon l'routy ex-'15 were pres- 
ent at the Phi Sigma Kappa banquet. 

At the Kappa Sigma gathering, 
Albin M. Kraemer *%, of Spring- 
field; Mark Brown ex-'03 ; George 
W. Paulsen '10, of Thetford, Vt. ; 
Francis S. Bcarann '10, of Ware; 
and Harold H. Howe '11 were 
present. 

Silas Williams '12 and Edgar M. 
Brown '11 represented the alumni for 
That* Chi. Albert W. Dodge '12, 
of Weston, was present at the Sigma 
Phi Epsilon banquet. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Orrics Hours: 
etolBA.M. 1. * H>toO *».M. 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Miss. 

H. B. WHITE 'IS. Afent 

10 Allen Street 



lUVENiR Calendars 



Just the kind >..u like to bring home to the folks. 
Many different views of the campus and buildings. 

PRICES: 10c, 15c, 20c and 25c. 

The best line of Christmas Cards in town is dis- 
played on our counters. No use waiting until you 
get home to buy them. You cannot find a better 
assortment anywhere. 



Henry Adams 



T*i© RBXAX,r* Store P" «*»«> corg! 



i 



CLASSES WILL DEBATE 

Iuterclass debates in competition 

for the class debating cups will soon 

begin for the year. Prepa rations 

have btafl made for the MlMtloa of 

representatives for curb of tlie four 

classes, and the preliminary febatei 

:l iul co:wliing will soon begin. The 

time of the final ...ntests has not been 

,1. ruled on, but they will come as 

-,,..11 after the holidays as MM 

. ,-able. The Public Speaking 

Council will provide for the debates. 

Prof. Henry K. Smith, the member 

from the English department, will 

,.)-operate with the <lass rt p reaa a 

t:ttives and assist in training the 

debaters. 

InterclasB contests opened a new 
interest to the students last year. 
The classes responded well, and some 
, \. , llent debating resulted. The 
. B ps offered as prizes to the members 
..f the winning teams, although 
Minple in design, are e\<e,dingly 
desirable trophies of college Ml 
:nid the renewal of the offer this year 
will M doubt add to the intei.M 
Nineteen-tifteeuas freshmen made an 
. , 1>( ■■ ially strong fight, and only the 
i.-.ision of the judges ended specu- 
lation concerning the MMfbOMjJ ti 
•heir taking the final contest. 
sl„,nld l'J16 this year put up as 
strong a team and the upper classes 
-elect teams that equal those of last 
year, a lively series of debates may 
b« looked for. 



PROF. McLEAN BANQUETS 
TEAM. 

Prof. John McLean gave | banquet 
Thursday evening at the Prospect 
House to the fourteen members of the 
stock-judging class. After the ban- 
quet the party adjourned to Prof. 
McLean's house where the rest of the 
ereaing was spent. The evening's 
.;it itaiuinent was in honor of the 
Itoek-Jadgtng team, and Prof. Mc- 
Lean bad on exhibition the Guernsey 
trophy won by the team. 




ClK 

pheasant 

Bmltttj St., 
Bmberat 

Telephone 470 



4- 



BKIAKFAST 
LUNCHION 
ArTeHNOON TEA 

I»inn»r if arranged for. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANDY TONIC 



Tradition wears a 
snow -white beard, 
and has the wisdom 
of experience. 

The pipe is a col- 
lege tradition. Fill 
yours with 



l-WiriWr 

10c 





and you will endorse 
the dictum of your 
predecessors. 

Velvet the choicest 
growths of Burleyleaf 
is mild, rich and sat- 
isfying-yet withal in- 
expensive. 



SWEATERS 

and 

MACKIMWS 







The Fall season is the Sweater time of tin* year. The Football 

games call for M.ickinaws and Sweater*. We are showing the 
best styles oi the best makers. No fancy price! in tW- store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 




SANDERSON & THOMPSON 






School and College PbotosraplKrs . 



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LOCAL-L.Y. 5 Md South Had , cy MaM . 

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artists and moit complete 
equipment obtainable 



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1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Eleotrioal 



MGDRE'S *2?o 

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FOUNTAIN PEN 



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The Collsge Signal, Tocedsy, December 17, 19"- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
R. H.VANZWAI.KNBURG'ij.Editor in Chief 
CHESTER K.WHKP.I.F.R'u.ManaRinREditor 
OSCAR O.AMDERSOM 'l% Awistant Kditor 
FRFDF.RICK D. OR IGOS »IJ. Atatotfc Editor 



S. MILLER JOROAN'13. 
HARRY W. M I ER '«3. 
STUART B. FOSTER '14, 
ERVINE F. PARKER 'M. 
HAROLD C. BLACK '14. 
J. ALBERT PRICE -15, 



Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Campus Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Department Editor 

Associate Editor 



GEORGE E DONNBIX'tf, Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMERT. 

GEORGE ZABRISKlE.id. '13, Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI.ARK.lR.'u.Asst.Bus.Manager 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Aist. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOIGH *is. Circulation 

Subscription $1.50 per year Single 
copies. 5 cento. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 



PM Ofrtc. 



•a woond-cteM matter at tha Amherat 



Vol. XXIII. Tuesday, Dec . jt. No. 13 



The next issue of the Signal will 
be that of Jan. 14th. 



Tnonr.it the addition to the College 
dining hall was a much-needed im- 
provement, one thing seems to have 
been overlooked. That is the 
absence of adequate coat rooms. At 
present there are 815 men dining at 
Draper hall besides 44 waiters. The 
total number of serviceable hooks in 
both entries does not exceed 75. 
This means that one hook has to 
suffice for practically four men. It 
may be true that not all of the men 
are present at the same lime, hut on 
the whole, the majority of the men eat 
together. Then there is a piling up 
of the outside wearing apparel fre- 
quently two and three deep. Coats 
were not made to be hung on the 
floor, although they do make admir- 
able dust cloths. The generous addi- 
tion of hooks will be much appre- 
ciated especially at the suppers on 
Informal Saturdays. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notice* for this column should r» dropped in 
the Sir.WAI. Office or handed to Stuart S. Foster 
14, on or before Saturday preceding e»th Issue. 1 

pec, 18 — 1-80 p.m., Assembly, Dr. 
A. D. Call, Washington, D.C. 

j)e C# ]o_ r,-45 r. m.,M. A. C. C. A., 
chapel. 

j> c . 20 — 6-00 p.m., Christmas re- 
cess begins. 

j an . 6 — 1-10 r. m.. Christmas recess 
ends, chapel. 

CAMPUS NOTES 

"Merry Christmas," says our 
esteemed contemporary the Bingville 

"Ted" Shaylor and "Roy'TIaskins 
ex-M.') were back at college for a few 
days last week. 

The Amherst Stuilent makes the 
remark that "Christmas comes on 
Dec. 25th this year." 

Kappa Sigma held their annual 
initiation banquet at the Prospect 
house Friday evening. 



Beta Kappa Phi initiation banquet 
was given at The Warren, South 
I)eeiueld, on Friday evening. 

James Albert Price '15 of New 
York city was elected assistant man- 
ager of football at the assembly of 
Dec 4. 

The orchestra did nobly. One 
voting lady said, "Why, it's the best 
orchestra I ever heard here," and 
being one of the regulars, she should 
know whereof she speaks. 

James Dudley French' l.'l, of Hyde 
Tark, Almon Morley Kdgerton, '14, 
of West Springfield and Harry Nis- 
sen '14 of Uoslindale have been 
pledged to Theta Nu Kpsilou. 

Judging from the number who left 
town before the Thanksgiving recess 
commenced, and from the number 
who are planning to leave early this 
week, the double cut rule does not 
seem to exert a very restraining 
influence. 

The freshmen class held a meeting 
Wednesday afternoon and elected 
managers of the various athletic 
teams as follows : baseball, Kldridge ; 
basketball, Dunbar: hockey, (J raves. 
The matter of class hats, to be pro- 
cured after green buttons go out of 
stvle was also discussed. 



anything you experience in the relig- 
ious life. 

It is an awful thing to live depend- 
ing on your religion to give you 
heaven afterwards You are living 
in eternity now. God has made 
every man in the expectation that he 
would perfect his work. May the 
impulse of God reach into your souls, 
for it is worth while to live in the 
knowledge which God intended you 
should have. 

'11.— Herbert W. Blaney called on 
college frieuds last week. He is now 
employed in landscape work iu Ohio. 



Bolles the Shoeman 



Headquarters for 



Skates, Skating Straps, 
Hockey Sticks, Pucks. 



Academy 



PTHIPTON . A rW 

WEEK OF DECEMBER 9 

Tin HNinampiN Players 



IV 



E.M. BOLLES 



»• 



»* 



By Augustus Thomas 



REV. ALLEN G. ST0CKDALE 

In one of the most powerful and 
forceful sermons evei delivered at the 
college, Kev. Allan (1. Stockdale of ] 
Boston, spoke last Sunday on "The 
true definition of eternal life." An- 
nouncing as his text John 17:5, 
•'And this is eternal life, that they 
might know Tine, the only true Cod. 
and Jesus Christ whom thou hast 
sent". Mr. Stockdale said in part: 
One of the interesting things alnnit 
the world is that it is unfinished. 
The dullest thing you eould imagine 
would be this world in a finished con- 
dition. The wisdom of Cod is shown 
in nothing better than in this. The 
amount of battle in the world is the 
thing that makes it interesting. The 
true optimist is the man who is glad 
to see a fight on. 

The truest, happiest, clearest things 
in this world are visions made. Now 
there are visions and visions. There 
arc some persons who are visionary 
merely, who do nothing but dream ; 
then there are people who have vis- 
ions that seem impossible and imprac- 
ticable but have them come to pass. 

I hardly see how any one can think 
of finishing the spiritual life in three 
score years and ten. This is eternal 
life : not life that is indefinitely per- 
petuated, but life under new condi- 
tions, life under new opportunities to 
work out new destinies. If you had 
to work on and on as in this world, 
I am sure the vision of immortality 
would make no appeal to you. The 
soul goes on in its infinite reach, in 
its reach for the eternal God. This 
world is but the kindergarten, the 
beginning of things. 

The truest and best things you 
experience are just as mystical as 






EVERY EVENING AT 8:00 

Prlcea 28c. 50c and 7Sc 

Wed. and Sat. Mats, at 2:15 

Prices 2Sc and SOc 



Coolep's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 




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NATIONAL AUTHORS 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



The College Signal, Tuesday. December^. '$»<• 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communications to the Signal concerning 
.tters of general interest are welcomed. 1 he 
, \l is not to b* held responsible (or the 
ni'>ni thus expressed.) 

KniTORS of TmCouaoa Signal: — 

Dear Sirs : 

In the last issue of your valuable 
paper there appeared ■ letter ad- 
ding the reorganization of the 
Senate. It seems apparent, that this 
spirit of unrest toward our govern- 
mental powers here at M. A. C. is 
of a destructive nature. The 
democratic spirit, of which we are 
proud is at stake. 

The non-fraternity man. who it is 
claimed is to receive the greatest 
benefit from this reorganization is 
not saying a word. He is appar- 
ently content with the present student 
eminent. What is the cause of 
- ,-, .formation? What is its aim? 
,i ne time ago a committee was 
;M ,,M.mted to investigate the situation 
in other colleges and give I ivp.-rt. 
I ii.v did this, and what was the re- 
,,,lt? Wheuever the non-fraternity 
, were represented, as in our pro- 
.1 scheme here, it worked unsat- 
■ torily. That was one rSSIM 
wli\ the reorganization here has been 
,1,1;... ,1 thus far. Furthermore, in 
,, r to give the non-fraternity more 
canal representation with the frater- 
nity men, it would bi necessary t<» 
i approximately one man from 
i, :;n non-fraternity men, since the 
ngg membership of a fraternity 
boat SO Sad aa according to the 
-heme suggested each fraternity is 
•weil one representative Sm h 
urangement as this would cause 
tat senate to be so large and nn- 
«i, -My a* to make it practically use- 
for just dMSf purposes for whieh 
it waa organize. 1 

It is also indicated, that the non- 
fraternity men are not represented in 
management of informals. Here, 
if anywhere, the spirit of democracy 
..st prominent at M. A. C. The 
informals are managed by the frater- 
nity men of the college and e\ 
Iv is welcomed. Ro dSStfaM ti..n 
idl between a fraternity or non- 
fi .t.n.ity man. As regards so called 
••payment of debts ineurred," they 
bom only by the men who attend 
informals, and everybody pays 
■aSM proportion. It would haidly 
i ante this arrangement, thai 
th. non-fraternity men are imposed 
n to any great extent. Further- 
r« the informal committee intends 
mi informals so as to just meet 
enses, and if in case any surplus 
I the committee gladly subseri- 
to such "philanthropic enter- 
-." as repairing pianos and buy- 
• hairs for the use of the entire 
lent bodv, and not as so many 
n to think, providing the com- 
if with free trips to the Academy 
Music, 
the system now in vogue is de- 
ed, no doubt the true democratic 
t. which is so beneficial will 
pear also. What will be the re- 
Very naturally the same as at 



other colleges, namely, the death of 
informals and the adoption of private 
fraternity dances. This system 
would be most detrimental to the ex- 
ttttaee of the ever-sought college 

spirit. 

Another student government body 
which has much to do with democratic 
ami college spirit, is the Fraternity 
conference. This body is composed 
of men representing the fraternities, 
just as its name signifies. Do 1 un- 
derstand that the fraternities in I 
of inter-fraternity disagreement 
should seek advice from the non- 
fraternity men? It has been proven 
many times, that the fraternity con- 
ference is capable of settling its own 
disputes aiising between the frater- 
nities. The conference, 'tis true, can 
only make a^gentlemeu'a agreement." 
Show me the college man, possessing 
an average amount of honor, who 
will break a gentleman's agreement." 
If a fraternity wishes to break an 
agreement at the sacrifice of honor, 
who is to settle the dispute? It is 
certainly to be hoped, that the frater- 
nities are at least capable of settling 
their own disputes. Remember we 
are dealing with a body of American 
college men, not a mob of uncivilized 
Turks. It seems absurd in the I S> 
heme to even imagine the non-frater- 
nity men making the rushing rules 
They arc not interested iu such things. 
If ■ fraternity man is elected to a 
college otllce » l > 8 not necessarily bi 



Those advocating the shortening | that a properly planned prom season 



cause he is a fraternity man. It is 
his own ability and popularity, which 
makes hi- election possible. There 
is no rtaaSfl undci the [.resent exis- 
ting conditions why an able and 
popular non-fraternity man should 
not be elected toothce 



of Junior From festivities present a 
number of reasons. Among them 

are : 

That added plans in the festivities 
interfere seriously with regular col- 
lege work. 

That such a program has its incep- 
tion in thoughtless imitation of other 
colleges and is not therefore I good 
policy for this institution. 

That iddsd plans increase an ex- 
pense already questionably large. 

That the tendency toward longer 
••From" festivities will invite adverse 
criticism of the college from the tax- 
payers of the state. 

That such a program tends to les- 
sen the democratic spirit of the 
college. 

First, as to the interference with 
college work. Facing matters frank- 
ly, I '-From" docs interfere with 
studies. It is one of the two big 
social affairs of the year and the man 
who does not feet a slight quickening 
of interest at the piospect '"* indeed 
an anomaly. Will the increased 
time make any perceptihle difference ? 
Those who have attended proms and 
those who have not aver that it will 
not. The spirit of unrest is not con- 
fined alone to two or three days but 
extends over the entire week. It SOI 
its real cause ill the •'From" itself. 
Therefore following the reasoning of 
the objector.- to a logical conclusion. 
•bolish the Fromenade and deny the 
men all social life. Futting aside 
this general consideration we are 
face to face with tin- fact that the 
Wednesday afternoons before drill 
starts iu spring are vacant for a ma- 
jority of the students. 

Second. It is said that we should 



attempts to avoid even the present 
expense. 

At certain times the student body- 
is t lotted out on exhibition before 
public delegations. Iu this matter 
of general interest the studentH co- 
operate good naturedly. The stu- 
dents merely desire on the other 
hand to give their guests a concep- 
tion of the College in all available 
branches of its activities. Adver- 
tising of this nature (if we may use 
so cold-blooded I term) raises the 
College in the public mind event- 
ually, as much as "Exhibit A" 
moves His Excellency to open- 
handedness. 

Fifth. A student has said "The 
democracy of M. A. C. can be made 
a more dignified democracy." Is it 
necessary for men to cast aside the 
social life of a community in order 
|a have | democracy? 

The presence of guests upon the 



>i i»e eiecico iu"»"«. . , 

Th , it would appear best no, iuutate .he en^.ms of ,„l,e, eol 

■ If.,., .... I...,..ii_.- ....in. ullie 



for all concerned, that we leave the 
present organizations aa they are un- 
til they become incapable of serving 

UM. 

QflO. A. Mam.ktt, 

Sec. and Trcas. of Informal Com. 



gmwai ot Thk Combos Btes a i :— 

Agitation following the presenta- 
tion of Idsasoa ".lunior From" fes- 

tisities have been widespread. Fro 
:tnd con. the ..pinions held seem to 



leges. Must we. because SSBM "th.-i 
institution has found I custom good, 
therefore bar it from M. A. C. .' V\ I 
adopt the ••From" custom because It 
is good and affords a legitimate out- 
let for college activities which are 
just as much a part of the course as 
m holaslic work. 

Third. The "prom'* festivities 
,,tVci opportunity to show to guests 
the College at its best. Within the 
past three years seseral student 
activities bftfl developed which are 
worthy of success. From "week" 



be very firm. 

Headers who are not undergrad- ,,lTers to dramatics, to the musical 
uates may be interested to know that clubs, and the like, opportunity to 

show the progress of the College in 
ihese directions. In a properly 



the agitation centeis about legisla 
,„,„ for a 18 SOOT "From." This 



interferes with the plans of the Ores planned prom "week" the sleigh-ride 

enl student committee as follows: It j H dropped in favor of these l.giti- 

prevents an ice carnival planned for i mate activities. This cuts out one 

Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 12. ; Q f the chief items of expense, for in 

This carnival would include a game ma ny cases the "day after" costs 

between two hockey teams of good , nor e than the actual "From" itself. 

standing in intercollegiate hockey If such a plan is carried out the in- 

.■ (kB ; creased prom festivities will not add 

It prevents a concert given by the to the already questionably large 

■osteal clubs of the college on expense. 

Wednesdav evening. The clubs K,,,,,,!,. Adverse criticsm of 
lev.- this year been so fortunate as pi(mi festivities by the taxpayers of 
to secure .John Wand of New York the state implies that the students 
citv, choir master of Calvary church, are becoming more expensive bA^sfa 



campus tends t<> center the attention 
of the men upon their own personal 
appearance and conduct. It raises 
the standard of the whole student 
body. It will not create as has been 
predicted an aristocracy, hut will 
lid to our democracy a gentlemanly 
dignitv. No rural community could 
live in harmony were social event-, 
curtailed. Why then should the 
students of Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College who aim to enter the 
mral vocations slight the social side 
of task training. 

Entertaining guests during From 
is a serious problem here. The stu- 
dents are realizing it with increased 
intensity. The best apparent rcm- 
edv is that the students provide a 
means by which they cm eventually 
entertain all their gueats. Ent- • 
tabling should be done at the frater- 
nitv houses — not because other col- 
leges ha\ e adopted this means, but 
use it fits our own peculiar 
,,,,, is. The son-fraternity men at- 
tending would lie provided for in 
these house parties. 

Guests thus entertained often in- 
clude young ladies from neighboring 
institutions. In such cases a chap- 
eron from each college should be 
present at each house party b> share 
responsibility with our own faculty. 

Such heavyweight discussion of 
these matters may seem ridiculous in 
a college newspaper but we felt, 
called upon to "obey that impulse." 
The ideas expressed here are not 
meielv those of a small group of stu- 
dents, but of the greater part of 
those interested. 

Very truly yours, 

"A Oaoor of Bassos*." 



a man of unusual musical ability. enjoyments. 



To the Eorroits ok rut. Sminai. : 
Dear Sirs : — 

I have interpreted the brief and 
rather scathing editorial of last week's 
issue relative to the Junior From as a 
call for the members of the junior 
ch.ss feo defend the charges against 
We have just shown the proposed Jumor From festivities. 
















The ColUfe Signal, Tuesday, December 17, 19"- 



The President very cleverly and pos- 
sibly wisely closed M avenue of ifflH 
II1( .,,t by eliminating the question of 
what other institutions do. in placing 
this college in I el:iss by itself. 
However we cannot forbear to 
Mb the statement that our men 
ip«nd less money on their l'roin than 
the men of any or a dozen of the re- 
presentative New England CoUefea. 
The chief cry has heen that we wish 
to extend the time of the l'rotii. This 
18 not true. Last year the lVo.n 
closed ollicially, Saturday evening hut 
I personal canvas shows that nearly 
BOiof the guests started home on 
Sunday. This year the proposal is to 
hegin the festivities Wednesday MM 
and close ollicially and literally M 
Saturday. using exactly the same time. 
That it would ••decrease the the dem- 
ocratic spirit of M. A. G by tf" in- 
I few men I chance |0 spend more 
inoiu-v than others coiihl alTord" is to 
M staunchly denied. Kvery year we 
see men attend informal*, take in ath- 
letic trips, and enjoy other allied fes- 
tivities that many of us cannot tinan- 
ciallv undertake and yet we would all 
,hny emphatically the assertions that 
our college is not as democratic as 
any college in New Kngland. 

It is asserted that the proposed 
plan would "emphasize the social ac- 
tivities to the disapproval of the tax- 
payers. " Which do you think would 
meet with their heartiest dis:ippm\:»I 
—the fact that a -'gym" period was 
utilized for a Winter carnival follow- 
ed b\ a musical conceit b\ the com- 
l.iucd college clubs in tin- chapel as 
outlined in our proposed plan in add- 
ition to last y« ar"s sehedule. or the 
semi - chaperoned midnight slei-h- 
lides terminating anytime before 
dawn Sunilax morning as customary 
in the old plans and which is done 
away with in the proposed coins 

events? 

From a student's standpoint and 
perhaps, therefore, a prejudiced one. 
it seems na though objections were 
baaed on the petty details. The men 
who are attending, scarcely one- 
twelfth of the student body, are not 
asking forexcuses from classes nordo 
thes look for special exceptions in 
their favor, which, to tread on for- 
bidden ground, is extended at many 
colleges in the way of pre-assigned 
* lessons, excused cuts, etc Hoping 
that you can see your way clear to 
publish this attempt at journalism. 
I remain. 

A .llMoU. 



the time this is printed, the English many men never discover their gifts, 
Department will have placed the or- because they do not give them a 
def forth* MM, and 1 trust that chance to develop. Tome 



they will be on exhibition ■ few days 
later. Until provision is made for 
giving some collegiate recognition for 
excellence in debuting, diamatics. 
and the like, corresponding to ath- 
letic letters, such trophies as these 
cups ami the medals given in the 
other contests are the highest honors 
that a man can achiev They are 

well worth winning, even at a large 
expenditure of time and effort. 

Preliminary contestants who may 
not be chosen on the class teams will 
vet have further opportunities in the 
'preliminaries for the college debate. 
in competition for the prizes ami 
medals. Another excellent oppor- 
tunity that is coming our way is 
found in the triangular league pro- 
pMtd to include M. A. (' . Rhode 
Island State, and one of the other 
Mate institutions in New Kngland. 
We ought never to let this opportun- 
ity of getting into a good leagu. 
hv Besides this, there is the return 
debate that we owe Khodc Island; 
and I am told that Springfield N . M. 
t \. college wishes us to debate 
with them as well as play football 
with them. Besides these chances, 
all good, for getting practice in pub- 
lie speaking and making a MM for 
the college, we have our Flint and 
Kurnhum contests. 

These opportunities for profitable 
practice in public speaking appear to 
me as good as we have ever had. ami 
perhaps better. The Public Speak- 
ing ( oiincil. with the co-operation of 
the students, can put debating and 
>ratoiy in as desirable a position as 



that if the students take hold heartily 
with the Public Speaking Council, 
If, A. ('. ought to make a record in 
debating and oratory this year. Our 
opportunities are excellent. 

BOMSI W. Nkvi.. 



INSIDE INFORMATION 

"In colleges and universities today 
the college paper is the one institu- 
tion which cannot be killed. It may 
be on the verge of bankruptcy, its 
promoters may be expelled from 
school, and the editor may have to 
run to preserve his life, and yet the 
old paper still comes out on time 
The students may not subscribe for 
it. the advertisers may refuse to give 
longer to charity, ami the paper may 
be the object of universal ridicule, 
but there is always MM fellow who 
will work all night, think in classes, 
and give his last . cut to keep the 
paper alive. 

>-<>f course college papers have 
their fat years like other institutions. 
Their editors do not always need a 
shave, the business manager is occa- 
sionally seen in a new suit, and fre- 
quently a body of students will be 
induced to subscribe quite generally. 
Sometimes the college paper is . Ml 
in g.Kxl repute. Its poetry is en- 
dured for a MM with 110 show of 
violence, its swollen ideas concerning 
its ova importance are charitably 
. pted. and its stoiies of bio ath- 
letic prospects. iserMatd enrollments 
and brainy faculties are received for 
the truth. 



••Peihap- the iea-011 for the lon- 
the nan interested in dramatics have j gevity of the college paper is that it 



made for our dramatics and that is 
saying a good deal. Moreover, al- 
though my personal interests would 
Ik« more in dramatics than in public 
-peaking, I am compelled to acknow- 
ledge that for all-round usefulness 
■ad benefit, and foi fitting our men 
for successful careers after they 
have us. the public speaking is per- 
haps more important than the dram- 
atics but both can thrive. 

M\ ol.-eivatioii is that when an 
M. A. C man once gets his interest 
aroused, he turns in to do things 
thoroughly. Now we need to get 
our interest up in public -peaking 
1 hi- vear. It is so much worth while 
as a discipline and a practical prepa- 
ration for the life our graduates 



has a< -quired the habit of boosting 
everything that could withstand I 
MM*. If there are only five facultv 
members and fifty students at the 
-ident's reception the paper will 
wiite of -a great throng of happy I 
guests,' and when the school's teams 
are defeated in every game there 1- 
110 athlete who is not referred to as 
worthv of I place M the all star 
aggregation. 

••In the early days of higher edu- 
cation college papers appeared inter- 
mittently, once or twice a year ; then 
the publication stalked forth in 
monthly form with long stories and I 
treatises; later the advertisers were 
induced to pay for weekly issues ; 
and now any large university should 



will lea. I. that it will repay every |„. : ,l,le to publish a morning and an 
man for his time who is so situated j evening daily. Whatever becomes 
that he can reasonably undertake it. Lf the college paper of future yeai-. 
Add to this the unifying effect of ( . V en though it continues to rustle its 
wholesome class competitoii in the pagM in the faces of many non-sub- 
scribers, it will never lose any of its 



PUBLIC SPEAKING OUTLOOK 
GOOD. 

To 1111. Fiuroits 01 1111; Sh.vvi. : 

Public speaking opportunities intcnlass debates, and the chance ot 

• W ear so good this vca. that 1 wish ' winning college trophies and achiev - 

to ask I little MM in which to speak lag college honors that any man may !lW ay." 

- tli(Mi| be proud of. and we ought to have | 

' Fi'rst'come the interclass debates, many of Ml best men coming for- 
for which the preliminary provisions ward and by best men I mean the 

MM been made, I am told. Fast men of earnestness and resolution. 



vigor until all things collegiate pas- 



The northern end of the pond 
looks as if a hot water drain had 
b«ea run in there If «M* •'*' the 

::::;;::: "-.1 :;;.::; ..".- *..:-«.?- - -■ •• *• -> ; ;-":,- 



THE NEW BOY AT MONTAGUE 

The Roister Doisters, in "The 
New Hoy" made their initial bow to 
the public for this season in the 
Montague Town hall, last Thursday 
night. As in former years the open- 
ing performance lacked somewhat the 
polish and fine dramatic interpieta- 
tion evidenced in later appearances 
hut the production was M the whole, 
well given and the opinion was ex- 
pressed that this year's play was 
superior to that of last year. The 
hall was tilled and Montague added 
one more to the list of hospitable 
receptions accorded to the M. A C. 
dramatics 

"The New Boy" is a three act 
fane I'V Arthur Law, dealing with 
the adventures of one Archibald Ken- 
nick and his wife. Martha, fet Dr. 
Candy's boarding school. Scheming 
Felix Roach a distant relative of 
Candy's and his daughter Nancy are 
the other major characters. De 
BrlMfl the French master. Stubbei. 
the irate farmer, Kullock Major, tin 
school bully and Susan, the maid help 
develop the laughable plot that runs 
through the play. As yet. individual 
stars have not made their appcaram « 
ami although some familiar names 
in the list of those taking part give 
promise of starring before the season 
is much older, there are new Thes- 
pians in the Koister DokfaWl who 
show signs of dramatic ability 

Miller .Ionian, familiar to those in 
college who have witnessed him in 
••The Private Secretary" and "What 
Happened To Jones" took the title 
role in an easy and natural mam 
••|>ick" Hyland was again highly M 
ciissful in a feminine part as Ken- 
nick's wife, while George Zabriskie 
1'nd interpreted suave and scheming 
Roach with great skill. Stuart Moir 
again appears as an elderly gentle- 
roan and as Dr. Candy -coied as big 
a hit as last year. In Alfred Wilkin- 
M.'i. the management has found I 
Nancy who surely would shine at an 
informal, while Frederick Read « 
the impassioned Frenchman with eon 
siderable spirit. Clover Howe »ll 
made his first appearance in Aggie 
dramatics as Bullock Major and bul- 
lied the unfortunate "New Boy" to 
the delight of his audience. Tin 
part of Susan was very well taken by 
Hulsizer, a freshman who will un 
doubtedly make good" in Ml 
dramati' 

A quintet from the college orcbes 
accompanied the cast and furnishe<i 
music for the dance following. The 
men were entertained over night bj 
the towns-people. 

To the very efficient coaching of 
Mr. James K. Mills '77, who Ml 
generously given his services for tin 
pa-t three years, much credit should 

, ( ,.onled for ttl MOTVl >g ■•* 
Rehearsals will be held i'u'n. week an«i 
it is expected that all round improv. 
ment will mark the performance 
scheduled for the Christmas vacati" 1 
trip through New York and > 
Jersey. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 17, 191s. 



IN PO 



EXTENSION SCHOOL 
MOLOGY 

The department of pomology 
through the extension service is hold- 
ing a school in pomology at Buckland 
this week It is a new venture in ex- 
teusion-school work to devote an en- 
tire week to any one subject, but the 
pomology department feels sure the 
school will be a great success. 
The department has prep a red an 
\tensive exhibit of apples, similar 
the one for which they were 
Bided a special medal at the Mass- 
ehusetts fruit show in Boston a 
s\ weeks ago. Barrels packed by 
..per and improper methods are be- 
ing shown. Au important feature of 
the exhibit is the ln-hox display of 
ipples showing all the important 
.mmercial (tacks. There is also a 
small display o r fancy retail packn- 
- showing the practical and imprac- 
,1 types of this class. 
\ large shipment of packing equip- 
,t. spraying, pruning, and graft- 
ing apparatus is of great help in illus- 
Mf tbe lectures and making the 
demonstrations complete. Those in 
ndanee are given :ill opportunity 
to examine and study the most prae- 
I and up-to-date apparatus used 
in apple culture. 

Buckland, located mar Apple 
Valley is one of the leading apple 
ions of the Commonwealth. The 
• nthusiasm of the growers insures 
Ibe success of the school. The fol- 
lowing program is l>eing given 1 

PROGS \M 

Monday. 

o 10-45 *• *•• Varieties of Fruit*. 
Dr. J. K. Shaw 
10-45-12 M Orchard Site*, 
Mr H.J. Wilder, Bureau of Soils. 
Washington, I). C. 
, 00—3-30 p. M. Fertilizers for the 
Orchard, Mr. H I) Haskin* 
Tuesday. 

•,0-10-45 A. M. Establishing an < >r 
char.l. Mr K. W Ree* 

1045—12 M. Orchard Fests, 

Professor F. C. Sears 
Spraying Material*, 

Mr R. W. Ree* 
Spraying Apparatus, 
Professor F. C. Sear* 
aesday. 

;o— 10-45 A - *• Praatag— Geeeral 

Principles, Mr W W. Chenoweth 

,-12 M. Pruning Apple Trees, 
Demonstration, Mr. R W. Ree* 

-2-15 P. M. Grafting. 

Mr. W. W. Chenoweth 

-3-30 p. M. Packing Apples in 

Boxes, Mr. R. W. Ree* 

'.ty. 

, -o— 10-45 A - M - Packing and Hand- 

ng Fruit, Mr. W. W f . Chenoweth 

— 12 M. Packing Apples in Bar 



too — 2-15 p. a. 
" '5—3 3° •'• M - 



! 



els, 

—2.15 p. M. 

IC Orchard, 
31" e. M. 
ng Apples, 

10-45 A M 
es, 



Professor F. C. Sears 
Soil Management in 
Mr. R. W. Rees 
Storing and Market- 
Professor F. C. Sears 



1 



Packing Apples in 
Mr. R. W. Rees 
-12 M. Co-operation among 
uit (".rowers. Dr. A. I.. Cance 

-2-15 P. M. Horticultural Litera- 
re. Mr R W. Rees 

-3-30 p. M. Apple Cirowing in the 
mapolis Valley, Nova Scotia. II- 
-trated. Professor F. C. Sears 



FREDERICK P. WILLIAMS 05 

The following article is by W. K. 
Hinds, an "Aggie" alumnus now in 
Auburn, Ala. 

I am sure that many of the friends 
of Frederick l'ercv Williams, a grad- 
uate of M. A. C. in the class of 
190ft, and Indeed many M. A. C. 
men who did not have a personal 
acqudntalice with him, will be glad 
to know something more of the life 
and work of one of our alumni >\ I 
life, though W MM cut short, has 
been well spent. I am writing as 
one who has known Williams inti- 
mately, particularly during the pa-t 
four ycais.and I am glad to DMT tes- 
timony to the character and work of 
a friend whom we shall miss much in 
Alabama. 

Natiek was the native town of 
Williams, whose birth occurred Sept. 
|ft, I88S. He was reared in the 
e!i\ironnient of that beautiful SOberb 
of Iloston and graduated from its 
se|i.»ol8. His lo\e for the beautiful 
things out of dOOH was a deciding 
factor in leading him to enter the 
Ma-s:irhusetts Agricultural Collage 
M he did in the fall of 1901. 

As a student his record appears to 
have been good Aside from das- 
work M was a member of the baud 
and was interested also in baseball 
particularly among •olh-gc athletics. 
lie was a member of the Kappa 

Sigma fraternity. In his college 

work he was most deeply interested 
in horticulture, landscape gardening 
and fore-try. He was chosen el 
-e- 1. tar\ and in that capacity main- 
tained 1 close tomb with the mem- 
bers of his class up to the time of 
his death. 

After his graduation he accepted 
an appointment as superintemlant of 

unds at the Notthampton bat 
asylum where he remained for nearly 
, 11. He then became conneett-d 
with the metropolitan park coin' 
si, ,n of Boaton acting dant 

superintemlant of the park at Milton 
during 1908. In 1907 under W. II. 
Manning, one of the most eminent 
landscape m hitects in the Halted 
States, he had charge of the installa- 
tion of a number of large c.mtraet-. 
working particularly in Connecticut, 
v York. Illinois and Michigan. 
In his Michigan work he was engaged 
in laving out a model town for a 
large steel plant. As a result of the 
curtailment Of landscape WOT*, due 
to the panic in the fall of VMM. Wil- 
liams was induced to consider an 
appointment as assistant horticultur- 
ist at the Alabama experiment 
tion, the appointment becoming 
effective Jan. 1,190ft. 

During the time that he spent in 
Auburn, in addition to his regular 
work and purely as a matter of love 
for the subject", he offered an extra 
course in landscape gardening, the 
first to be given at the Alab 
Polvtechnie Institute. This OMfM 
was taken as an extra study by a 
number of the senior agricultural stu- 
dents who were more than ph 
with what they were able to get In 
this wnv. Duridg this year also, he 
began the preparation Of his series of 
detailed plans for the improvement of 
-rhoolirrounds and his interest in this 
subject led to the publication entitled 
"Tbe Improvement of School 
Grounds" issued jointly bv Prof. H. 
B Maehintosh. bead of the horticul- 
tural department and P. P. Williams. 
His interest in this subject had con- 
tinued and he has uTOOgbt about a 
decided improvement in the environ- 

m 1* i..!..4 „. *-*«.! ,,iilfiir-nl 



Potatoes That "Ate Good" 



A KRIKN'h WROTE US Many potatoes yield large, 
look tine, but eat poor." In our Potato Contest just 
(ompleted, there were many crops wtticb yielded large, looked 
fine and "ate good, " fat the prizes wen- aw aided on a scale 
of points which MOlidered quality M ••■ -» s quantity, and 
some who had quantity fell below those who had quality. 
There were 

18 Crops over 300 busliels per acre ; 
1 1 of them were over 400 bushels per acre, and 
3 of them yielded over 500 bushels per acre. 

The Census gives 148 bushels as the average yield for New England 
and 'u Wuslirls fur the whole counti>. The average yield in this 
•est (33 acres) is 334.7'' bushels per acre. 

Wfl %lii»ll publiih 4 taliuUtrd itatniit-nt o( hmjII, Willi tin* rMthodt vtPploMd; 
Also .1 o>i>> of thi <"t» ♦.(lowing 1 1 »»- Mortal *n«t th' wrthul ••( KoriHg 

\ fttudv "t thev t tUI I Ihould prove intert-stinic jnd Intlin I 

\\ .- shall be kapp* t.. mall * cspi I l»e*i 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boaton 



F. A. SHERARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



,11 



Kuppcnheimifs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 










That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C &. K. 

OAMI^IOJVa Sole A K ent. 



OVERCOATS 

\Y. made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 



We make thnn all and make them right at- 







of mnuv district •fricahoral 

MMOti ami roral schools scattered 
throughout the state. 



MPION' 

Colletg* 3 * Storea. 



11 

i 






rt 





8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 17, 19" 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



lobbersnf Wrought Iron and Brass I'ipe, valve* 
and Fittings tur Steam, Water and <>av l«bt*toa 
and Magnesia Boiler ami Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to sketch. M>il Sappltea. Kn«n eeri and 

KS*s;:', .!!: ;W?£; Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 

Connections. Holyoke, Mew. 



theTeachers Exchange 



Of J< 



1..0 Boy I st on St. 



C&rpervter & Morehouse, 
PRINTER 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass, 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We ire ready at the start to furnish you with I fine 
line of Campus' and Fraternity House View*, ftlao Pn* 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and < aref ul attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us ahout Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



liuin."li:ttt'lv following romim-lict- 

ment,h« married Miss Franeei Heard, 
it native of Auburn. In September 
of the same tear, Profomo? Mackin- 
tosh left upon :> year's leave of 
absence for study and William* was 
appointed neting pro^eaaor of nnrti- 
culture, taking ui> oninerous li«>ts of 
work that had previously been carried 

on hv ProfeaaOf Mackintosh. Among 
the subjects of his investigations tin- 
following bare been prominent : The 
breeding of peach varieties to secure 
resistance to Brown rot ; an Investi- 
gation Of lbs l»«-st nu-thod for storing 
Irish .''ml SWeet potatoes and tin- 

determination of the beat varieties of 

peaches, apples, plums, persimmons, 
and grapes : particularly for Alabama 

climate. 

The titles of his station puhhea- 

ii,,iis Indicate subjects in which be 

has Keen especially interested. 

Among these are rather extensive 
bulletins upon the pecan and the 

satauma orange, both of which are 
being very extensively planted at the 

present time near the gulf COOSt. 
Besides ■ bullet! I peach growing 



journey bj boat In the hope that he 
might be restored to health. While 
he was materially benefitted the 
improvement did not coutinue and he 
failed quite steadily from that time 
on. It seems that his real eondition 
eras not known even to the doctors. 

About the middle of Novem- 
ber it became certain that he was 

suffering from tuberculosis appar 

cntly complicated with other troubles. 
He had kept up his work till that 
time but his physicians advised him 
to go at once to* Ashevilte, N. C. 
assuring him that they expected his 
eurlv recovers. His friends wen 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash Bloch. Amherst 



H. If. Rogers, 15. Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio I'hone 303-2. 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 



NH7 



Standard ot Excellence for over 50 Years - - - II » I I* 



QUALITY 



THAT MEANS 



ECONOMY 



Every Farmer should study Ffficlency and Economy In the use 
of Fertilizers. This does not mean the use of smaller quanti- 
ties of fertilizer ; but It Does Mean the use of the Correct 
Amount of the kl K ht Kind of Fertilizer for Each Particular Crop 

There is an E. FRANK COE FERTILIZER to ».< < I* requirements 

of every crop »n every hind of soil. Ow experts (who arc 

practical farmers) will be glad to assist you in making your selection. 

Your Crops are Better Judges of Plant Food Values than are 
the nost Expert Chemist*. Let Your Crops Prove to You 
the Superiority of E. FKANK COE BRANDS This Year 

Beware of those fertilizers whose only commendation is a 'cut* in price. 
This is an admission of one of two things -either they have been too 
high-priced in the past, or they are now being made of cheap, inferior 
materials. 

Said the late Prof. Voorhees, •*•« Director of the New Jersey 
Experiment Station : " The Value of a fertilizer to the 
farmer depends not to much upon what is paid lot it, as upon the 
character of the materials used to maKe it." 

The superior character of the materials used in E. FRANK COE'S 
FERTILIZERS has been proven during over fifty years' use by the 
best farmers and vegetable growers. 

Insist upon getting GENUINE E. FRANK COE BRANDS, not 

something said to be " just as good." 

(Our Annual Fertilizer Booklet, and Handsome Calendar for 1913, will be 
sent free of charge while the supply lasts) 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 

51 CHAMBERS STREET NEW YORK CITY 



,,, Alabama he has another upon Self 

boiled lime sulphur and its noes, and 

fumigation of nursery stock. Part Of 

these publications have been made in 
oonneetion with assistants in his 
Office as was the la-t of his bulletins 
dealing with vegetables growing in 
Alabama. 

\\ illiains vac made professor of 

horticulture in duly, 1910. As head 

of the department he became e\- 
ofltcio state horticulturist and secre- 
tary of the Alabama state board of 
horticulture having charge of the 
urn -ei v inspection work. He was 
also .h'eplv interested in the Alabama 
ho.ticultural Society and was three 

times elected as its secretary. 
Through bis enthusiastic efforts in- 

-I in the society increased, the 

membership more than doubled sad 

th,\ were able to resume publication 
of the proceedings of their annual 

tings. He eras an active member 
of the National Nut Growers' Asso- 
ciation. In 1911 OS collected what 
in possibly the most extensive and 
reliable collection of the beat peeans 

to he f< d anywhere. (her 100 

varieties including all of those known 
u "standard nut-." and many of the 
beal seedlings which have m.t 
lieen accepted as standard, are found 
in the exhibit. II. has been a fre- 
quent orator also at Farmers' Insti- 
tute* and othci similar meetings and 

bis demonstration work in the home 
running of fruits and vegetables has 
served to afOOSS and extend an 

active interest in that subject. Dur- 
ing the paal yen* in partnership with 
an" Auburn graduate he established a 

first-class green-house plant known 
:( . i|„. Opellks Horal company in the 
city of that name not far from 

Auburn. 

Outside of all such professional 
work he WSJ an active member in the 
(ahum Baptist church and a teacher 
i n [fa Min.lav-s.hool. He was also 
., member of 'the Masonic lodge ami 

was Interested in the working ol the 
local chapter of the Repps Sigma 
fraternity. . . . 

There can be 00 question that his 
ambition far outran his strength 
II,. uas not naturally of strong phys- 
ical constitution and so had an up- 
hill light in Which I"" battled with 
courage and coeerfulnse. 

For several months past both he 
andhisfriendshad realised that he was 
no, even In norma) health and be was 
almost constantly hi the can of phy- 
sicians, lb' ineni the month of 
' August in Massachusetts making the 




Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company 

WANTED ! 



r\nyont who has ever sold B< 10ES, 
Typewriters, Insurance. Collier 
Mining Stocks or anything else, to 
write me and learn how he can m**" 
$100 a month without making >"> 
investment but his time to write 

JOHN W. TALBOi 

South Bend. Ind. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 17, 191 2. 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



is as much superior to other sepa- 
rators as other separators are to 
gravity setting methods. Why go 
but "half-way" when buying a 
separator? Why not insure satis- 
faction by getting a DE LAVAL? 




greafly surprised and shocked by the 

news of his death which occurred at 

Ashev ills on 1 >.<■. I 

Be haves in Auburn a wife and 
two -.mail children and in Massachu- 
SettS 8 father, step-mother, grand- 
mother and hall-brother. A- - 

aa the seriousness of his condition 

was known Ma wife and father hur- 
ried to Asheville. The burial occur- 
red at Auburn on Dec 6th. The 
funeral service at the Baptist chuich 
irai attended by the college faculty. 
Student bo.lv. and Ma-oiis. the latter 
organization also conducting tin u 
services at the ceinetcrv . 

We shall miss him greatly here in 
Alabama but as we measure life by 
deeds and real construct i\ e vain. 
feel that he truly lived a full and SUC- 
-t'lll life. It would seem that be 
might have chosen forhil life's motto 

these WOl.b 

•• Desire not to I ve lon^ but l«i live w. II 
How kMg you live, not ve.us but a. turns 
tell." 



The De Laval Separator Co. 

1H.M8T llr..*.lw»T, » X. NsjMnS It* 

w York. < hi.ajro. 




THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canav.m 
Have you tried them ? 

Don*t Forget 

That we are carrying a good line of 



PROFESSOR CHURCHILL ON 

HONOR. 
Prof. GeOTfl It. Churchill of 
Amherst college spoke to the stu- 
dent body in Wednesday** Assembly 
on the meaning of the word l *honOI " 

He tra-ed the development of the 

word's meaning through Latin and old 
English, and pointed out the mean- 
iii"it should have to the collegian. 

"Cribbing," said the speaker -'t- 
dishomuable. and moreover, in per- 
sisting in the practise, the college 
man is going according t.» standards 
which he know- >U> not exist ill the 
world beyond the college doors." 



NEW YORK SLUMS 

The speaker at theChristian associa- 
tion last Thursday evening was Frank 

Kami, a William- gradual! who 
is doing P. ('..work at M. A. 0. HV. 
Band, who spent last summer in the 

slums of New York <itv. doing set- 
tlement work, gave I very vivid and 
forceful picture of conditions that 
exist in the Jewish district there. 
He brought out the fact that personal 
dishonesty is. in elTect.the maxim of 
the people; that the -gang" is their 
ideal organisation ; and that intense, 
though hollow Judaism characterizes 
the whole race, while disregard for 
law is tin- natural coime.pieme of 
their cm iionmeiit. 

Mr. Band strongly urged that more 
fanners take a few slum children fot 
a couple of weeks in the summer, to 
give them an opportunity to nit the 
green country and blue sky . 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whfi in j. It ha- pleased (••■•I m In- 
infinite wisdom n> take to himself oui 
id ami in. .ill. i Pi n j F Williams, 
therefore, be it 

AV„.;.v,/. That *e, the membeiR ..I 
the I u">a fr aieii.tty. do BStei d 

to lus f.iiniU our mih etest grid | Sad be 
it further 

/V. i i,..t .i . em «>f the* n 

lutions In- sent to t"«* bereaved l.inulv. 

and thst .. i epj be ptthttsaeel in the t ol 

lege Sign.il 

II ui.ii i. ' I'.i a< k ^ h(iI ,,„. 

I »VIKI I lv I, , p raterlltty . 

i ki am <■ Asi»xasox, J 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



BIRDSklL 13 



FARRER 15 



BanBLtusn l«H 
STKPHEN LANI I ' < > 1 - 1 : m K 

MANUrAITr'KI.Mi JKWBkBK 

ls.i llKOAIiw \X tftfvf VllKK 

«i.im \m> <«>r.i.i i.i 

I'INs AND BUffCM «<* 

-...i.o. sii.vicr Afto sasosnsa »«ww 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes 



Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 




STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXIENsKS Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 




Makers 
if 



CAR A GOWNS 

To the American ( ollrgetfrnm the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. CUs» ContracU a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 



LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Masa. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



C. R. ELDER 



Strenuous work, old man, but that 
pure, wholesome Fatima will help. 

With each p*rlntrt of FaHma vou frl a 

ttnwl r «<fj'"i, . 5 of irhi hfcurr a hand- 



" for 

"Distinctively \ ^ 
r^7 '£&?» </ *— • ** ^dividual" IJ 



pennant nut" 

Kml . / 'tr~*n.mf roll»m;UnternUk and 
Fraltrnai Uratn (l-xJ2) »e/«« *.«n ^ / / J. 



Cksmt »nly from I A. M. to 4 A, M. 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes snineo ami Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open Snn<l«y Main St. 

On way to Post Office. 









'I 





IO 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, December .7, *9'*- 



PLAYING 
CARDS 




The Massachusetts AericulturalCollece 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six baching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground white you wait 
College Jbwblky 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (iuitar Stru, 

AMHKUST, MAs> 
Next to Post Office. 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



Aiulter«t, Ma»i 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone w~ « 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Wright <3to Olteeo.i 

Catalogues of 

K*ili **e Winter Ooucla 

\re out Copy mailed to any address C. 
students and Athletes whowant the real, sui 
articles for the various sports should insist 
?h!>sVlearmg the Wright & Ditson I rade M 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
2 I-2C 

a iK 
48c per duz. 
30c per do*. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Sun 

Ralph l.tOtBSM, Agent. 7 North Cottaga 
Ei-WAKP C tDm xKiis, ARent 

Put full name and address on laundry 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN « DYER, Prop*. 



Athletic Hoard, 
The College Senate. 
Football Association. 
Baseball km « iutimi. 
Track Association, 
Hockej Association, 
Tennis* Association, 

Rifle club. 

Roister Dulttfl 

Musical im '" iatiou. 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 
k bridge Club, 



QOOffl II. Chapman. S« -i.-tarv 

F. D. (iriggs, Piesident 

S. B. Freeborn. Manager 

L Kdgar Smith, Manager 

h. 11. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little. Manager 

C. Bokelund, Manager 

J. W. T. Liiifii Becrel 

Harold F. loses, Manager 
J. 1). French. Manager 

F. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 
II. M. Rogers . Manager 
L Gh DmrtOS, President 

.1. l. Mas... Pi ee id e n l 

w. s. Utile, PweeJeot 

\ f. M.Dougall, Presides* 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



When Fitti ng Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets. Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Skat'gShoei 
<. Sweaters 
1 Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

Wright & Ditson Goods are the standat 
all sports 
WHKiHT Se DITSON 
U4 irasMaH— Bt, Boston. Mass. 

~ THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

Oulckc.t Mr*le«. H*«t Work. Lowest fttat 

AH woik carefully done. Work called for and 
dei»«red Cents' 'overcoats, suits., pants and 
coats Ladies' hne linen suits a specialty 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



TeL No. Hi-* 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEOE for MOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Oentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till ii o'clock KVEKV night 

Corner Amity aSi IMeasaut streets 



If you want to be 

|OUI WITH THK miiXH 

yon nuit hare your clothe* presae-l and cleaned 

ATBPSTEIN'S 

11 Amity st. Maroon Store 

Pressing and Cleaning a »p.cUliy 

rre»»> t, U|)|)l i ihera | (taM syutrm In town 

Tel. 303-11 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Care at Reasonable Rates 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers < 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, . 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. ' 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



n«HERST & SUNDERLAND SI It CO 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowk- 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATES 

The Republican gives the best repots of 
Agricultural College and Amher rt 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

Daily, %8. Sunday, p. Weekly,* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 14, 1913. 



No. 14 



SIXTEEN BASEBALL GAMES INTERCOLLEGIATE SHOOT SUCCESSFUL TRIP 



FIRST GAME LOST 



On Next Season's Schedule. 
Campus. 

Manager Smith of the baseball 
team has announced the schedule of 
baseball games for the coining season. 
It consists of sixteen games starting 
with Worcester "Tech" and ending 
with the annual commencement game 
with Amherst. It is as follows: — 
April 111— W. P. I. at Amherst. 

25— U. of Maine at Amherst. 
•2(',_Williaui8 at Willinmstowu. 
•_>;»— Trinity at Hartford. 
\| uv 3 — Dartmouth at Hanovci 
7— Tufts at Medford. 
H — Boston College at Boston. 
!)— St. Anselms at Manches- 
ter. 
10 — U. of Maine at Orono. 
16— Holy Cross at Worcester. 
16— Union at Schenectady. 
24 — Open. 
28— Y. M. C. A. College at 

Springfield. 
30— Y. M. C. A. College at 
Amherst. 
,|,,„ e 7 — Norwich at Amherst. 
U— Amherst at Amherst. 
Williams, Ackerman and M<(larr 
tbi only men lost by graduation 
.,1 kssJ year's team. It is vet too 
early to judge material in the fresh- 
man class but with the men that are 
already on hand Capt. Huntington 
look* forward to an excellent season 
,< h Fitzmaurice is already here so 
tv practice will begin earlier 
* usual this year. 



Four on First Shoot Brings Score of 953. Out- 
come of Match Not Yet Announced. 



ft J 



r ISES HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

: imager W. S. Little of the hock- 

, am has made several change- in 

. & M-hi-dnle of games, the revised 

>f which is as follows : — 

n. 15, Young Men's Christian 

m elation college at Amherst ; 1«, 

Amherst on Pratt rink; It, Yale at 

\.w Haven (pending) ; H, Harvard 

at Boston. 

Feb. 1, Louden Field club at Lake 
lieorge; 7. R. P. L at Amherst ; S, 
Young Men's Christian Association 
■ •ollege at Springfield: 12, Dart- 
mouth at Hanover; 14, Massachu- 
Institnte of Technology at 
I nherst. 
March 1, R. P. I. at Troy. 



NEW LIBRARY RULES 
Books reserved for assigned reading 
i| be borrowed from the library for 
rue use over night, but must be 
turned to the library by 8-30 the 
xt morning. 
A fine of ten cents per hour or part 
hi hour after the time when books 

due will be imposed. 
Fine accounts not settled at the 

iry will be sent to the treasurer 

collection. 



The Massachusetts "Aggie" rille 
team opened its sixth season on Sat- 
urday with its first Ill fH match, 
running up the excellent score of !>.'>.". 
against Norwich university. This 
store is unofficial in that under the 
new rules governing all league 
matches, the targets aft to be sent to 
Washington for final scoring. Scr- 
g.ant l.'-e. however, scored the tar- 
gets before sending them on to h.ad- 
quarters, and. as he is a careful and 
conservative judge, there is little 
doubt as to what the official count 
will be. 

For the past tin - Massa- 

chusetts has been lepresented by 
rille teams which haw eventually 
won the Intercollegiate Indoor rifle 
shooting championship of the I'nited 
States each year. By hanging up I 
record of \>:>.\ points for the fust live 
semes and I8ffi l0» grand total, this 
vear's team I'ids fair to maintain or 
even surpass the high standard of 
previous years. Two of the Hi 
best scores in Saturday's match were 
shot by new recruits. 

The national rifle association has 
adopted a new kind of target for tin 
matches this year. There are five 
bulls'-eyes on the one card, allowing 
l.nt two shots at each bull. The 
targets are lettered in a series so 
that each man uses a target of the 
same letter and series for his prone 
score that he does for off-hand 
This new form of target is used only 
in the match and not in practice. 

Captain Kdminster, as usual, led 
the rest of tin- team with 1 '.».*• for 
total. Hyde and Forbush were the 
other men to reach 190. Griggs, 
Clarke and Whittcinore. the other 
veterans, were less fortunate, owing 
largely to lack of practice. The new 
men were well hunched ami did 
remarkably well for the lir-t match. 
The same team will shoot against 
North Georgia university in the 
ond league match this afternoon 
Saturday's scores follow : 

Standing. Prone. 

F.dminster, o 6 99 

Hyde, 9' ,0 ° 

Korbush, 9* 9 s 

Wetherbee, 9* f* 

Headle, 9' 

Oertel, 9° 97 

Dunbar, »7 95 

Griggs. 85 97 

Clarke, 8 S 97 

Whittemore, 8> 9 s 



890 



975 



ratal 

195 
191 

190 
.89 
188 
187 
182 
182 
182 
'79 

1865 



The second team easily won its 
match with the Technical high school 



Completed by Dtamatics Club. Cast 
Shows Steady Improvement. 

The second annual ( hristinas trip 

of the Roister Doisters took the 

IflS-ltlt production "The New 

Bov" into seven towns and cities ami 

was I most sue. e-,sful and enjoyable 

one. With the exception of HacUeii- 

1 sack, the houses were good and the 

press comments wen' unanimous in 

j their praise of the work of the men 

taking part. It may be mentioned 

here that this was the most extcnsi\e 

trip taken by any M. A. C. OffMatsV 

ation heretofore, lasting from Dee. 

26 until .Ian. I. 

The men met in Haekensaek.N. J., 
her 26th and held an afternoon re- 
hearsal. No final organization «.~ 
backing the performance there ami 
owing to faulty advertising, the 
■■ill IT I was small. The work was 
not up to standard but was well 
received by those present. The 
27th brought the Roister Doisters to 
Rutherford. N .1. Despite the had 
weather, the house was good and I 
very creditable perfoi mance waa 
11 in the City hall. A .piaitet 
from the college orchestra furnished 
Mile for the enjoyable dam e that 
followed. The men were ei.tei tained 
at private h.-uses o\ei night and next 
morning left for Richmond Hill, 
Brooklyn. As last year. Is»th mat- 
inee and evening performance! m ■■•■ 
given - both times tociowded MM 
Dancing followed the play and the 
men were entertained st private 
houses. The .piality of Hie :•« tin-; ll 
evidenced by the remark thai 
M. A. ('- dramatics had proven 
superior to any amateur dramatics 
ever seen in Richmond Hill. 

The next performance was given 
under the auspices of the high 
srhool in Suffern, N. Y., Monday the 
;oth. The play was very well 
received ami was followed by 
dancing. 

At Monroe, N. Y. the next even- 
ing, the high school athletic associ- 
ation staged the production and both 
performance and danof were charac- 
terized as the most enjoyable eve! 
held in Monroe. As in Suffern the 
men were gnests of the high school 
boys. New Year's day found tin- 
cast*; speeding toward Binghamtoii. 
New Year's dinner was eaten on the 
train, the destination not being 
reached until WW o'clock. 

I'nder the auspices of the city 

Y. M. C. A. the play was given that 

night in the Y. M. C. A. building 

to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

The players remained at the Y. II. 



Dartmouth Lucky to Win Hockey 
Oame, 1-0, on Poor Ice. 



1 Continued on 



21 



[Continued from page 2] 



Massachusetts lost her first hockey 
game of the yeai on Saturday to the 

last Darin th sewn in a olOM and 

exciting game on the eampus link by 
(he small margin of 1 to D. The ill 
luck which has camped on the trail of 
the team since before the vacation 
showed no disposition to quit. The 
day was waim ami sultry and MM 
quentlv the link was eovcrcd an inch 
deep with slush and water. 

As far as real hockey went, the 
game was a farce. It was impossi- 
ble to can y the puck, so both team- 
1, -oiled to knocking it up and down 
the surface in an eudeavoi to get 
near enough to the goal to push it in. 
The steel blades cut ittlo the ice BO 
that skating was dilllciilt. 

It was the Second time within the 
week that Dartmouth had made tin- 
trip to Amherst to |>lav the game. 
Wednesday was the original day 
for the contest but raitl made a p. 

ponemenl necessary The lee was 

ideal on Thursday and Friday SO 
Manager Little arranged for the gam.' 
for Saturd Immediately the 

i„r moderated. Aitei ad tins 

tlOllble. how, v.l . il was deelded to 

play the game regardless of the con- 
dition of the link. 

The game opened with both team- 
lighting foi a NOte while th. -m I 
was at its best. None of the play 
was able It Hfl the pmk but I few 
inehes olT the let, M -hot- :.t the net 
rompaiatively few I »ai tmollth 
Hiicceeded in seoiing the only goal 
iflaf four minutes of play, Wai 
maker making the -hot doHaJ » 'ni\ 
np in front of the "Aggie" gfSst 

A few minutes hit. 1 I hisholm 
,| |( ,ve the pmk int.. the net on I shot 

from the side. The jo.V of the 

"Aggie" suppoi teis was but momen- 
tary, howevei , when it wasdi-overed 
that the puck had slipped in under 
the net rather than by the goal tender 
and the point was not allowed. The 
■ MH'urcdto be evenly matched 
throughout the first meiO al 

Massachusetts eame back strong 
in the final period. Dartmouth was 
Cm. ed to give up all offensive ta< n. - 
to proteet her {0*1. Bkl was siic- 
<,,| in this but only after the 
hardest kind of :• light. The half 
.|.aracteri/e,| by the star work of 
( 'apt. Iliitehinson and .fones of the 
"Aggies " Time and time ngaiu they 
broke aw ay with the pmk only to lose 
it in the slush in front of the Dait- 
mouth goal. 

Neither team could develop any 
team work under the conditions. 
Wanamaker and Capf. Mason cxee!- 









' 




The College Signal, Tuesday, January 14. 19 '3 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 14, 19*3 



led for the Hanover men. The whole 
"Aggie" ttaia played well and 
showed promise of lots of speed in 
the games to come. The line-up : 



DARTMOl! 1 II. 

Donahue, g 
Delinger, p 
Johnson, cp 
Wanamaker, r 
Mason, c 
Frost, rw 
Tuck, Iw 



" AGGIES." 

g, Brewer 

p, Archibald 

cp, Needham 

r, Jones 

c, Hutchinson 

rw, Johnson 

Iw, Chisholm, Fernald 



old Mack were in charge. 

The ineuihers of the caste wish to 
make public acknowledgement to 
, ,1, .1. K Mills '77, to whose 
untiring efforts must be given credit 
for the work turned out. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE SHOOT 

[Continued from page ij 



Score— Dartmouth 1." Aggie" o. (ioal 
— Wanamaktr. Referee— Serbeck of 
Springfield Y.M.C.A.coIlege. Umpire— 
Denosh.i of Amherst college, Timers- 
Morse of M. A. C. and Slater of Dart- 
mouth. Time 15-minute halves 

The unusually open winter has 
handicapped the hockey team greatly. 
The first three games of the season, 
comprising the usual vacation trip, 
had t<> be ran. -.lied These games 
were to be with West l'oint. Syra- 
cuse and Williams. Their cancella- 
tion W9M especially di>appointing in 
that it gave the college no opportu- 
nity to see how the men are prepared 
for the hard panics coming the hitter 
part of this month. In fact lack of 
practice 011 the ice is apt to make 
the team-work shaky and the men 
sl..w. Previous to the Dartmouth 
game, which was postponed from 
last Wednesday until Saturday the 
men had only three opportunities to 
practice. 

With Lights DOW "p o\ei the rink 
previous practice dillicullies may be 
made up for, if the scheme of practis- 
ing at night is successful. All the 
men will be able to be present at 
evening practice so they will ha\e a 
chance of working together. The 
piesence of coach I'.roder will also 
help in quickly developing a good 
.111. 



of Springfield which was shot on the 
Drill hall range Wednesday, Dec. 18, 
by a score of 915 to 877. The 
organization of a second team 
is a new feature introduced 
this year by Captain Kdminster, ami 
bids fair to be a great suc< . 
More material has reported for the 
teams and experienced substitutes 
will always be available should the 
need for them arise. 



CLOSING OUT SALE ! 

Skates and Skating Shoes 



$4 50 Skates, - 

$3.00 Skates, - 

$2.00 Skates, - 

$3.50 Shoes, - 

$3.00 Shoes, - 



Now $3.50 
Now $2.25 
Now $1.50 
Now $2.85 
Now $2.20 



SUCCESSFUL TRIP 

(Continued from first pagej 



Sergeant Lee received the schedule 
of the Intercollegiate league on Kn- 
dav. Twentv-cijdit teams are en- 
t.red. Owing to the limited season, 
it has been necessary to divide the 
league into two divisions, the Kast- 
ern and Western as was done so suc- 
ceasfullv last year. The deciding 
match will come at the end of the 
season between the winners of the 
two divisions. Massachusetts is in 
the Kastcrn division. Four teams 
shape up as the most formidable 
opponents but as luck would have it 
three of them come well toward the 
.nd. Thev are Princeton. Columbia. 
Harvard ami •'Tech" The schedule 
for the Aggie team is as follows ; 
Jan 11. Norwich I niversity. 
\H, North (ieorgia. 
■_'.".. Princeton. 
1, Rhode Island 
s. Iniversity of Maine. 
15, < lemson Scientific College. 
IS, Cornell. 
1, Columbia. 
%\ Dartmouth. 
1."), Harvard. 
22, Lehigh. 
It, I niversity of Vermont. 

,. Ml. T. 



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April 



(A. untii Friday morning enjoying 
the privileges of the bowling alleys, 
swimming pool and |mm>1 rooms. 

1'iiilay night the last pcrforman. . 
was given in Wotvestci, N. Y. at 
the Wieting opera house. Despite a 
blizzard a good-sized audience 
applauded what was undoubtedly the 
most finished interpretation of the 
piny given the whole trip. Saturday 
the men left for Albany and reached 
Amherst via the Boston a Albany to 
Springfield, late Saturday night. 
The trip was a most successful one, 
enjoyed by every one who took it. 
In all, eight performances were given 
and the acting was very favorably 
received. The college was brought 
to the notice of many people and 
arrangements made for the musical 
clubs to practically duplicate the trip 
at Easter. 

The men making the trip were: 
in the caste, 1913, G. E. Howe, 
11 viand, Jordan, Moir andZabriskie ; 
1914, Read; Lflft, Wtlkins ; 1916, 
fllllllwrr ; in the orchestra, 1913, 
French, Griggs and Selden ; 1915, 
Tonry. Assistant manager, D. J. 
Lewis and advertising manager, llar- 



THE ANNUAL BUDGET 
The following is an extract from 

the President's report: 

"Fundamentally the need of in- 
creased appropriations, both for 
maintenance and for buildings, is 
due in part to the growth of the 
college in number of studeuta, but 
also in part to the increased activi- 
ties of the college made necessary 
by the rapidly enlarging field of ag- 
ricultural research, instruction, and 
dissemination. 

"The budget to be presented to 
the Legislature of 1913, as approved 
by the board of trusteess may be 
summarized as follows : 

Fou Increase in Current Annual 
Appropriations. 

Requested t 

Available 1913 lor 1914 Increase 

Investigation, $15000 fjoooo $15000 

Instruction, 75°°° 95°°° 2000 ° 

Repairs, '5 000 J5°°° 

$50000 
For Special Purposes. 
Agricultural Building, 1210000 

General Improvements 

and Repairs, 40000 



E.B. DICKINSON D. D.S. 

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Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

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M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOY TOWIC 

Kulridge'14 Rendalli6 



PETITION ASKS FOR LOWER 
EXAM VALUE 

Wednesday's assembly was ^iven 
over to :» student mass meeting 
The Senate's loinniittee for the rem 
ganizatiou of that hotly reported 
progress, and it was also announced 
that the Senate will take the manage- 
ment of the Informals out of the 
hands of the fraternity conference. 
A petition was ratified by the student 
body asking that hereafter examina- 
tions be counted as only 50 per cent 
of a student's standing in I I -nurse. 
and that evei v student he permitted 
t<> take all the examinations. This 
petition has been brought before the 
faculty and will be acted ujM»n at an 
early date. 

NEW STATION BIOLOGIST. 

Mr. H. I). Goodale has recently 
l>een appointed by the Trustees of 
the College as research biologist in 
the department of poultry husbandry 
of the experiment station. 

Mr. Goodale graduated from 
Trinity college in 1903 ; after spend- 
ing a year in graduate work at that 
institution, be entered Columbia 
Iniversity where for three years he 
made a special study of zoology. 
From 1!»07 to 11*1 1 he was eugaged 
in farming, and since Itll has li.ru 
eiii|»l<»yed by the Carm^ie Institution 
of Washington in ita department of 
experimental evolution. Mr. (lood- 
ale will begin his duties at Anilm-i 
February 1. 



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The College Signal, Tocaday, January 14, 19 » 3 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 14, 1913. 













THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

R, II VAN/.U A I I Mil' KG' M. Kditor in-Chief 
CHRSTER K.WIII- •.KI.KR'ii.MananinKEditor 
OSCAR <i. AMDERHON 'I* Assistant Kdit..r 
PR EDERICK I>. GRIGGS '"3. Athletic Kditor 
S. MILLRR JORDAN 'u. Athletic Kditor 
HARRY W. All I.N '13, Alumni Edltoi 

STUART B. POSTER 'u. Cimpus Kditor 

E H V I N B f P A '-' K ' * *M« A ,umni Kd,tor 

1IAROI D C. BLA< K '14. Department Editor 
J. ALBERT I'KK.K'i;. A*»octate Editor 

GEORGE K DONNE1 I.'is. A wdHi MHw 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZABRtSKlE ^i.'ij. Bus. Manager 

BRNEST S.CI AKK.IR 'u.A-a Itus.Manager 

1 RNEST F.UPTON 'U. As«t. Adv. Manager 

MAURICE I CI ' ' GW'H. Circulation 

Subscription $1 50 per vear. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd. 



Jan. 1«. 4-00 i>. m.— Informal. Drill 

Hall. 
Jan. 1!>. 9-15 a. m —Chapel. Dean 

George Hodges, Episco- 

palTheological Seminary, 

Cambridge. 



I1118 



Entered ■» •erond-ctaw nutter »i the Amherw 
Poet OWtee. 

Vol. XXIII. TriMiAV, Jan. 14. No. 14 



i\ bringing a patitkNi bafSort the 

facility fur I dstraBBB in the value <»f 
eliminations which everyone will be 
allowed U) enter, the Senate is at- 
tempting a reform which hns been 

long Beaded sad the value of which 

must become apparent to faculty as 
well an students. Although many 
colleges have be.u for some years 
running smoothly under the so-called 
honor system, attempts to introduce 
the system here have met with little 

M0OSSB. 

A reduction in the value of the 
final examination will result in tin- 
working out of an honor system. 
Student sentiment will create such I 
system and it will lose none of its 
power through lack of I name and 
formal agreement between faculty 
ami undergraduates. It is improba- 
ble that the honor s\Mcm as known 
in other institutions will very soon 
prOT« acceptable here, but I reduc- 
tion in the examination value will do 
much to make the ••exam" week at 
this college cleaner. 

The tendency to soak up a text- 
book "the Bigfct before" will also be 
lessened and the faculty as a conse- 
quence will get a liner estimate of a 
student's grasp of his subject. The 
change will not offer R screen to the 
loafer ; he will be ranked on his con- 
sistent work, m»t upon a brilliant or 
c.-opeiative spurt Thus in several 
ways our collegiate work will be 
brought nearer the faculty ideal. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[ Notice* for thu column should lw dropped in 
theSlt.NAi (iftn-.-or !i iiiHed tt. Stuart It hosier 
14, on or before *-,itur I >J IHIlildtHgaMn i«>sue. I 

,Ian. 1"). l-"'° •'• M - Assembly. Mr. 

QtOgga Q. Powell, New 

York city. 
Jan 16. 8-00 V. M. — Hockey. In- 
ternational Y. M. C A. 

college. 
Jan. H5. M« P. m. — M A.C. C. A. 

Chapel. 
Jan. I s - t*0Q a. m. — M. A. C. vs. 

Amherst college on Pratt 

Kink- 



CAMPUS NOTES 
A new crop of class hats 

appeared 

New fire-escapes have beeu placed 

on North College. 

<j. T. V. held their annual initia- 
tion banquet at the Prospect house 

on Jan. 9. 

At a recent Senate meeting H. D. 
lirown '14 was elected cheer-leader 
for the ensuing year. 

It is rumored that the "bow and 
arrow" kid has recently hung a fac- 
ulty scalp at his bait 

The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity 
held its initiation banquet at Sunder- 
land Saturday evening. 

A number of lights have been in- 
stalled along the cross walk, giving 
it less of a wilderness appearance. 

Wanted— A "misplaced eyebrow" 
lis sexeral seniors who find them- 
seho in the "impossibility" class. 

The sophomore basketball team 
will journey t«> Monson on Saturday 
evening to play the academy team. 

The interclass basketball series 
will start Wednesday evening in the 
Drill Hall with a game between 1911 
and 101*. 

The trials for the freshman debat- 
ing team will be held in the chapel 
Thursday evening and the inter-class 
debates will come at a later date. 

The Marlboro M. A. C. club held 
its annual reunion and supper on 
Saturday evening, Dec. 2*. Prof. 
K. A. Waiigh was the guest ami 
speaker. 

While a meal is in progress, the 
dining-hall coat room*, if the spaces 
thus BBed may be so called, resemble 
a second-hand store after a tornado 
has passed. 

Obey that impulse, ami go to the 
Proas. Don't put it off; take a 
chance— ask her now and dig for the 
price afterward. The invitations are 
expected next week. 

Saturday evening a large audience 
was entertained in the chapel by 
William A. Hurnett, of Amherst 
Mr. Hurnett read "The Need of a 
Change," a humorous sketch on 
Americans visiting England, by Jer- 



The freBhman team was defeated 
in basketball by Williston academy 
at Easthampton last Saturday, 4K to 
1. Mahoney scored the only goal 
for the freshmen on a foul. The 
other players were Hall, Moses, Dun- 
bar, Walkden, King, and Picker. 

At a meeting of the junior class 
recently B committee was appointed 
to make arrangements for the annual 
junior banquet. Powers, Rlaek, Ed- 
wards N. K. Walker and Leon Smith 
are to be the committee in charge and 
the banquet will be held, probably 
March It. E. W. Christie was 
elected manager of class basketball. 



Bolles the Shoeman 



Headquarters for 

Skates 
Skating Straps 

flockey Sticks 
Pucks 



Academy 
Music. 



WORTH iulPTOH S 

WEEK OF JANUARY 13 



The Honnampion Players 



IN 



E.M. BOLLES 



The Witching Hour 

EVERY EVENING AT 8:00 

Price* 2Bc. SOc ana 78c 



Wed. and Sat. Mats, at 2:15 



Coolep's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 







OEM K. Jerome. 

The sophomores are practicing 
daily in the drill hall for the develop- 
ment of a fast basketball team under 
Captain Pike. Manager Griggs has 
arranged a schedule of games with 
teams in this vicinity, some of which 
will be played here. 

The first of the preliminary trials 
of the interclass debates are sched- 
uled for Jan. 16th, and the question 
is "The Government should own the 
Railroads." About 20 freshmen 
entered the contest at the first call 
for candidates from that class. 
Later in the season a varsity team 
will be picked to represent the col- 
lege in the annual debate against 
lihode Island. 



-\rrXTT CAN WRITE PHOTO PLAYS AND 
lUU EARN $25.00 OR MORE WEEKLY 

We Will Show You How ! 

If vou have ideas— if you can think— we will show you the secrets 
of this fascinating new profession. Positively no experu nee or literary 
excellence necessary. No ■ flowery language " is wanted. 

The demand for photo plays is practically unlimited. The big film 
manufacturers are " moving heaven and earth "in their attempts to get 
enough good plots to supply the ever increasing demand. They are 
offering $ioo and more, for single scenarios, or written ideas. 

We have received many letters fiom the film manufacturers, such as 
VITAGRAFH, EDISON, ESSAN AY, LUB1N. SOLAX. IMP, REX, 
RF I \NCE CHAMPION, COMET, MELIES. ETC., urging us to 
send' photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets of success. 

We are selling photo plays written hy people who "never 
before wrote a line for publication." 

Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
good idea every week, and will write it out as directed by us, and it 
sells for only **5, a l° w fi g l,re < 

Yon Will Earn $100 Monthly For Spare Time WorK. 

-m-si-rci SEND YOUR BASE AND ADDRESS AT ONCE FOR FREE COPY OF 
FREE OUR ILLUSTRATED BOOK, " MOVINB PICTURE PLAYWRITIM " 

Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what this 
new profession may mean for you and your future. 



NATIONAL AUTHORS 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



WHAT THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY OFFERS 

Outline of Courses, and Suggestions to Those Considering 

Chemistry as a Major. 

Bl Dlt. JOSBM H. LiM'M I 



Chemistry may be defined as the 
-< ience that concerns the composition 
of matter and the changes which it 
undergoes. An application of this 
IQJSBOB to agriculture has been termed 
agricultural chemistry. 

In many states the agricultural col- 
lege is a part of the state university, 
and the agricultural student rSOBtvai 
the same elementary training in chem- 
\ as the maninothei departments 
of the university. He is later taken 
in charge by the chemical department 
Of the college of agriculture, and 
there receives his spatial training. 

Oiuect Of COCBSS vi M. A. C. 

The depaitment of chemistry at 
this institution has the twofold duty 
of giving the student a general e.lu- 
• ntioii in chemical principles and also 
of teaching him to apply these prin- 
- iplcs to the variety of problems 
connected with agriculture. 

The object of the course is mani- 
fold ; (1) it is educational and cul- 
tural; that is. it aims to teach accur- 
ate obaarvatioa, careful multiplica- 
tion, logical thinking, and systematic 
and persistent industry: (*2) it is 
intended to give to all students of 
agriculture a sullicient knowledgi 
liemislrv so that thev will be able 
t-i apply it to p r ac tical farm prob- 
lems; (3) it gives to students who 
picparing themselves for work 
- teachers and investigators in the 
• rues other than chemistry a 
knowledge of the subject sufficient 
to meet their individual needs ; (4) 
the undergraduate course prepares 
men for |>ositions as assistant chem- 
in colleges and experiment sta- 
tion laboratories, and also for chemi- 
cal positions in the fertilizer, cattle 
food, sugar, and dairy industries; 
(.*•) those who take graduate courses 
fitted for advanced positions as 
hers of chemistry in agricultural 
• olleges, as research chemists in the 
agricultural experiment stations and 
for the more advanced positions con- 
i< eted particularly with the agricul- 
tural chemical industries of the 
country. It is not the object of this 
itution to give men special train- 
ing in the many other branches of 
•ppUsd chemistry such as elect ro- 
mistry, chemical engineering and 
iron sad steel chemistry. Such work 
beloap to the schools of technology. 
Hi' course is, however, sufficient 
tl scope, bo that every industri- 
ous student who takes it should be 
to apply his knowledge to any 
1 nek of the science. 

I" soKHi.it I ihatk Cocaaat. 

ourses 1 and 2 (General and In- 

nic) are fot all students and of 

i ssity deal with the fundamental 

"f the science and apply them 



in studying the more common acids 
and metals. lloth in the lecture 
room and the laboratory, subjects of 
agricultural importance are always 
given consideration. These courses 
STB vital BO all college students for 
upon them hinges one's understand- 
ing of the science and its application. 
( otirsess 3 ami 4 (« Qualitative An- 
alysis) are in icality a continuation 
of 1 and 2. Aside from their value 
in training the student to observe 
and to think for himself, they are de- 
signed to teach the process of the 
>imilihiiiv> m />(ir<ition of the acid 
and metallic salts. They are abso- 
lutely necessary for chemical students 
and very helpful in giving one a ful- 
lei understanding of the principles 
of chemistry than can be secured 
from I and 2. 

Courses and 6 (Organic) deal in 
a systematic wav with the studv of 
organic comjK>unds, especial at- 
tention being given to agricultural 
substain They are absolutely 

necessary for chemists, and ini|>or- 
tant for all who intend to do any ad- 
vanced work in agriculture or in the 
other Bcienc. 

I ourses 13 and 14. Physiological, 
or biological chemistry as it is fre- 
quently termed, is in reality ■yate- 
matic organic chemistry applied to 
the multitude of chemical processes 
invohed in plant and animal life. 
It is the chemistry of life and should 
be taken by nil chemists, as well as 
advanced students of agriculture. 

Courses 7 and H ( Agricultural 
Chemistry, so termed) are intended 
for those having completed I and 2, 
who intend entering practical work 
and desire to devote the major part 
of their time to the special agricul- 
tural courses. Thev are designed to 
give a general understanding of the 
chemistry of soils, fertilisers, fungi- 
cides, insecticides and plant and 
animal nutrition. 

Courses i», 1<>, 11, II (Analytical 
Chemistry) give n special insight 
into the composition and value of a 
variety of agricultural substaie 
and also train the student in the 
theory and practice of analytical 
processes. They are to be taken by 
all chemists and are valuable for ad- 
vanced .students of agriculture. 

Courses 15 and 16. (Physical 
Chemistry,) recently introduced, deal 
with the more modern theories of 
chemistry ami their application to 
topics of practical importance. They 
are vital to all advanced chemical 
students. 

Course 1H. (History of Chemis- 
try) is intended to give a connected 
outline of the development of chem- 
istry from the earliest times until the 
present. Only the more important 



M. A. C. '71 

M. A. C. '00 

M. A. C. '11 

M. L T. '08 



GOOD MEN from these classes had a band in preparing the 
material used in our interesting book, "THE ANSWER.'' 

Wk*i U -'//« Anrmtrt* 

A pamphlet that means much to any student of agri- 
culture. Particularly so if he can read "between the 
lines." Mailed free to any address. 



BOWKER :rc T h : 



LIZER COMPANY 
Chatham St., Boston 



F. A. SHERARD. 

MEN'S STORE 



Kiippenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 






That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a O A K. 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 



-We make them all and make them right at- 




ns/cnousr' 

College vStort's. 




The College Signal, Tuesday, January 14, 1913 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 14, '9*3 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Bf»M Pipe, Valve*, 
and Kittinjrs f..r Meant, Water ami dav \sbestos 
and Magnesia llmler and I'ipe Coverings. Hp« 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Enjr»t«ar» and 
Contractors for Steam and II. -t \\ at. i Heating, 
Automatic Spunkier Systen.s. Holler and l-.n K ire 
Connections. Holyoke, Ma.«. 



thTeaghers Exchange 



Of Boston 



120 lioyhton St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C*rp*rvter & Morehous*, 
PRI|NTET*S, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst. Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture fuming given our personal at- 
tention. See 11s .itx.ut Croups and Poi trails for the very 
best work. 



steps in the progress of the science 
can. of course, be touched upon. 
Ckaim ate QOCMW 
The department is prepared to 
offer advanced courses in agricultural 
chemistry that will compare favora- 
bly with courses in other high grade 
institutions. Instruction msy be 
had in industrial agricultural chemi- 
cal problems, in the proteins, car- 
bohydrates and fats, in the chemistry 
of plant and animal metabolism, in 
physical chemistry and its applica- 
tion to soils and plauts, and in meth- 
ods of agricultural analysis. The 
student is taught methods of researeh, 
and if a candidate for an advanced 



degree, is given ■ special topic for 
investigation. 

Several graduate assistantships 

have recently been established which 

1 are obtainable from time to time In 

! industrious men possessing good 

average ability. 

Courses Students Siioi li» Ki.m i 
The writer is sincere in his belie! 
that many students at this college 
make a serious mistake in neglecting 
chemistry as a part of their college 
course. It is one of the foundation 
stones upon which restB the entire 
superstructure of agriculture. Cour- 
ses 1 and 2 are required of all stu- 
dents. 






Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash Bloch. Amherst 



II. \| K<m;kks. 15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St.. 



Studio Phone 303-2. 






EASTERN APPLE 



TROPHY I 



THE $750.00 PRIZE CUP DONATED BY THE COE MORTIMER CO. 

AT THE AMERICAN LAND AND IRRIGATION EXPOSITION 



WON BY 



MR. THOMAS W. STECK, of Opequon, Va. 

A USER OF COE-MORTIMER FERTILIZERS 




Ti > .ncHitirnife apple u'rnwinu in the V 
,u, .1 t...l.t, lie fa.t tl.Ht East- 

ern rai-*-d \i w|«ial '"• ■'" 

«ut»-ri.ir to Hit' Western |.n«luri. I he 
pan) ..nVn-d »t II • 
American l.andniiil IrTtfatkin f.\- 

f|..n. 1,. .1 iii \.« York rit>. N--VI-III ]■<*. 
Ml, t<> |x-. i-nil.iT end, the I AHI 
Al I'LK lltul'HY. a tiiaKtiiti.«ti( fMUW 
Print TI". 

Tin- eoaapaUUoa waa open to •van Fruit 
.1 in New Kiiktland. N<« York, New 
Jitm \ I enn») U :ini;t. Delaware, Maryland 
and Virginia. 1 hew were no "Mi Inga" <>r 
limitation* p n< ■••<! »n the r«m petition. I he 
, ;,,,! .,r wale of points was prepared 
hi I "r f- — — t II. E. \ an lU'iiuin. f.timrh 
I nin-.l Htatea Unvrrnmenl l'« n oi.mist. 
-in < I L-. •nerallt ronaidered the nt« *t ejperl 
apple |udge in Ihe ...iin<r>. 'I h.- Jnduitik.' 
of ih«ii|>pl.> :.' iheExpnaHkni waartonen 
p,,.f,.^,„ \ nu 1). man aealated b) r-t ii<l.-nt- 
in horticulture from t!><- N«» Jersey State 
. ulturiti College. 

pMSMaW Van Iieman state.! : "I have 

never ndged a -< t of exhibit* that, all 

things ennatdered. ha\e ipn rlcajr or 

higher on the arale of tlw arore c*rd. than In tblj 

ei.tni.elit -on "' Mr Me. k. the dinner, --.rid 2*1. .fi 
point* out of a prwafbta SB (SB ft* ■■•■ « ■■■ " ,n *' 
vnrieties ahowii). 
M, Ptaek'i rl.-est competitor «a« Mr, Oranvllh- 

\\ I..-.hK of Haneo. ,-. Kn .lei-ey. who scored 
t!9.n ptMntaout of a possible •.>»». 
\ oriklnir feature of Oil* competition Is that It de 
veloped after the prise «»s awarded, that Mr. 
s ., k. ihe winner, raised his wire fruit with < <*•- 
Mortimer Fertiliser*, v In. h V has umhI for the 
,ms, two years; pnrehaalna them in the open 
market fn'im one of ttte Coe-Mori inter local au'ents 
at Winchester. Va. 



Thns the superior quality of Cno-Mortl,ner Fertilizers for fruits is again confirmed. 



I Mil** 111*3 o*i|r* i •«»» ,,...-... ., ~- — 

Ba»*«Jae^ 

Why Hot Pit Your Fruit in ihe Prize Winning Class by Purchasing Your 

Fertilizers from 

The Coe-Mortimer Company, 51 Chambers Street, New York City 



Vocation 



Important Courses Deaiiahle Courses 



Teachers and Investigators in : 
(a) Bacteriology, 

Agronomy, Plant Physiology, 
(c) Kntontology, 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry, 

I'raitical Farme rs, i. e.. Dairymen, Gar- 
deners, and Fruit Growers; also 
Landscape and Floriculture Men, 



5-6- 9 


3. «3 


3, 5-6, 9-IO 


'3 


5-6 


3. 9 


5 6, 13 


3. 9-»° 



7 8 



5-6 or 13 



H utm o w raw Catanew. 

The <l«|t:utiiient will do all pcHwi- 
ble to secure placen u«>on gratlua 



neither will it ret-on 1 mend men who. 
in the judgment of the staff, an 
qualified. It is intended to st:un|. 



rue w Brtuic 4 ,...^».» ~, a* ' ■ 1 1 n \i 

.1 . .. it ,-iiiiint of uimiii every man reetmimentled the M. 

ton for worthv men. It eannoi, 01 1 "... . . 

...'^ „„v .n«n a .K^itioii A.C mark, whu-h Htands for qualitv 

i niirsc, guarantee any man a ikwiuou, 



JUNIOR ANNUAL. 

The Nineteen Fourteen In'I'J, 
which appeared immediately before 
the BoNdajts Ip bj thi> time familiar 
to most untlergrtitluateH, hut has 
,nohahlv remhetl few of the alumni. 
The iMM.k is supplied with excellent 
ami numerous cuts which are the fea- 
ture of the volume. In spite of 
some careless drawings the »KK>k 
presents a neat appearance. The 
grind section is the weakest in 
the book and is plentifully supplied 
with uninteresting space-fillers; the 
individual write-ups, h> not rise ab..s,- 
the average. In spite of some poor 
qualities which are easier to point 
.mi than to remedy, the ItU IndoS 
is worthy to take its plate on the 
shelve- beetles its predecessors. 

RESOLUTIONS 

Whrrms, It has phased Almighty 
(Jotl in His infinite wisdom to take to 
himself the brother, of our beloved 
friend ami brothci, Charles W. 
Whippen therefore be it 

BSSOiveaf, that in the members of 
the Kappa Gamma Phi Fraternity do 
•Stead to his family our sincerest 
sympathy in this their hour of grief, 
and be it further 

B*utv*4, that a copy of taase 

resolutions be inscribed upon the 
mortis of our Fraternity, that a 
,-opv be sent to the bereaved family 

tad tanl a copy be published in Tat 

OoLtaoa Signal. 

For the Fraternity, 

IIar<m.i» Lto», 

Ray I*. MacKkciimk, 

Dbnnis A. Shkkiiw. 



K«r« xi.i»i. ► ■> II 
SlI'.PHKN liANK POLORH 

MAWI'KAfl « WINIi .IKV\ I I I M 

IHllllHOAIIWAV. NKW VtllVK 



« nit \m> votAA K a n 

PINS AM) KlN«i!H ■.* 

(Illl.ll sll.VKM AKTII IIHOMKM Mtl>M - 



»** 



r» 



if ' 




Massachusens Northern Rail- 
way Company- 



NOTICE 

Competitors for the Signal must 
mark every sheet with their name, 

'04. — Raymond R. Raymouth, for- 
merly located at Taeoma, Wash., Is 
now in Chicago, 111.. 1409 K-f.O St. 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



Are In a Class 
By Themselves 



They cost but a little more than 
the cheapest, while they save twice 
a» much and last five times as long 
as other separators. 

They save their cost every six 
months over gravity setting sys- 
tems and every year over other 
separators, while they may be 
bought for cash or on such liberal 
terms that they will actually pay 
for themselves. 

I lie new 72-page !>«• t.aval Dairy Maad 
Book, in which important dairy question-* 
are ably diicutsed by the best authorities. 
II a book that every cow owner should 
have. Mailed free upoa request if ynu 
mention this paper. New 1913 De Laval 
catalog also mailed upon request. Write 
to nearest office. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas, It has pleased Cod in his 
infinite wisdom to take to Himself our 
friend and classmate Percy Frederick 
Williams r therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we the members of the 
class of 1905, do extend to his family, our 
sincerest sympathy in this their hour of 
grief ; and l>e it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolu 
lions be sent to the bereaved family, and 
that a copy be published in the COI 1— 
Signal. 

A. I). Tavi.uk, ) 

L S. Walkkk, [ For the Class 

F. L Vkaw. \ 



The De Laval Separator Co. 



MS- 167 Bmailway, 
New York 



W K. Madlaoa St., 
Chicago. 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

Iion't F'ot*4e«."t 

Chat we are carrying a good line of 
— TotMieoo 



BIRDSALL 13 



FARRER 'IB 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

I \ lKNSIoS. 

Tao i0»aooaa e o ata s opeaad dan. 

l.th with an enrollment of l."»<> |><r- 
8oii8. Of this number 9 are women. 
There is a comparatively small pit 
eentage of college men this year, 
the majority being from rural 
communities. 

The extension department is to 
conduct an agricultural extension 
school at Hri infield this week. 

The enrollment for the apple- 
packing school which is to be held 
from .Ian. I'M to the ftttfc is rapidly 
hiug the limit which is >et ;tt l<» 
members. At present .'M> having 
applied. 

POULTRT. 

At the poultry show held recently 
in Boston the |K>ultry department 
ha<l several exhibits. One exhibit 
consisted of 42 birds representing 21 
different varieties. There was also 
an exhibit of dressed poultry .and 
eir^s. The poultry was dressed so 
well that it excited considerable 
interest. A third exhibit consisted 
of poultry house equipment, trap 
nests, hoppers, etc. being among tin 
articles shown. 

The public in general showed I 
great deal of interest in what the 
college is doing along poultry lines 
and appreciated the excellence of the 
exhibits, especially that of the live 
birds. Several important breeders 
offered the department pens of line 
chickens. 

This year for the first time a 
department for general utility fowls 
was among the departments at the 
show. Several prizes were offend 
but as many raisers of utility birds 
ditl not understand the nature of the 
exhibit there were not many exhibi- 
tors. A committee, however, was 
aapoiated with Professor Graham 
as the chairman, to work this line up 
with a view of a larger exhibit in 
this department next year. 

In the class of college exhibits that 
of M. A. C. won the first prize con- 
sisting of |I0. 

ALUMNI NOTES 
The M. A. C club of New York 
held a special meeting at the Gradu- 
ates' Club, M West Forty-fourth 
street, on Saturday evening, Jan. 1 1. 
Dinner was served at seven o'clock. 
following which a lantern lecture was 
delivered by Walter L. Morse '95, 



terminal engineer of the Grand Cen- 
tral Depot, on the gigantic, improve- 
ments of that terminal. 

At the recent meeting of the New 
Jersey state horticultural society at 
New Brunswick, N. J., Hcven "Ag- 
gie" alumni were present, as followB : 

George A. Drew ".17. of Oreen- 
wich, Conn. 

Dr. K. D. Gilbert '00, vice-presi- 
dent of Bowker insecticide Co., 
Boston. 

M. A. Blake 'Ml, professor of hor- 
ticulture ami horticiiltmist at the 

New Jersey experiment stati it 

New Brunswick. 

Frank A. Bartlett '<>.">,of Stamford, 
Conn., who has recently returned 
from a business trip to New .Mexico. 

Harold F. Thompson "0.'». who is 
assisting in the short course instruc- 
tion at Kutgers college during the 
winter. 

Arthur .1. Farley '()«, assistant 
horticulturist at New Itruuswick. 

Orwell B. Briggs 'll'.i, of llowker 
Insecticide Co., Multimolc, Md. 

K\-'X2— President Daniel Willard. 
of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, 
presented the hoard of directors of 
the company with a unique Chn-t 
mas gift the Sand Patch tunnel, 
which was opened for train operation 
on Christmas day. The opening of 
the tunnel marks practically the com- 
pletion of the gigantic program of 
improvement inaugurated by Mr. 
Willard three years ago when he 
became president of this rOtd, and 
began tin- const i uctiou of ■ third 
track across the Allegheny moun- 
tains and the general rehabilitation of 
the property at a cost of |90 f <MO,000. 
The tunnel is al the summit of the 
Allegheny mountains. 'Ml miles hi -t 
of (umbel -laud. Its cost was ap- 
proximately )« I. -'•'<». IMM», and it has 
l>een regarded as one of the greatest 
engineering feats in the country. 
Its length is PMMi f,et. and it accom- 
modates a double track. 

XI. — Dr. II .1. Wheeler's address 
is 111 Grant Ave.. Newton Centre, 
and not 111 Orand Ave., as pub- 
lished in the issue of Dec. 10*%. Dr. 
Wheeler was in Worcester and 
Ham|xlen counties recently, looking 
over farms which have been offer c I 
for demonstration purposes, in coop- 
eration with the American agricul- 
tural chemical company. 

•;i7. Lafayette F. Clark visited 
relatives in the east during the holi- 
days. He is manager of a creamery 
at Oskaloosa, Iowa, ami his address 
is 312 North D. St.. Oskaloosa. 

'04.— Dr. A. W. Gilbert of the 
department of plant breeding, college 
of agriculture. Cornell university has 
accepted invitations to speak at the 
Ohio state university in January. 
One lecture will be given before the 
agricultural students and the Ohio 
plant-breeders association upon the 
subject of "The Breeding of Timo- 
thy," and the other will be delivered 
before the society of Sigma Xi upon 
the subject. "The Method and Scope 
of Genetics." 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Dally and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 

"student" 
furniture, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absoluie lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



ANIi 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 

as 



CAP A GOWNS 

To the American College! from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Claaa Contracts a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 






Toefil Mientka 

Shoes Sflined and Polistied 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open Sunday Main SI. 

On way to I'ost Office. 


















The College Signal, Tuesday, January 14, '9'3 



PLAYING 



CARDS 




The Massachusetts AeiicultiiralColto 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



Amtivrat. :\i«sa»a». 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shirts, - »°-'5<- 
Collars, * «-«■ 
Cuffs, "« 

Plain wash, • • 48c per doz. 

Same, rough dry, - - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Mr-am Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, I1.50 a Sun 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Fconoinic Entomology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



E. E. HILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo. Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKKST, MA»>. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone $9-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty o( Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 



Catalogues of 

l^uil 4te Winter Oooclss 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Collar 
MuoVnts and Athletes who want the red. supeiior 
articles f»r the various sports should insist upon 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson I rade Mark. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Kai 111 |. Homdsn, Agent. 7 North Cottage 
hnWAKK C. Ehwakks, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN ft DYER, Props. 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association. 

Baseball Association. 

Track Association, 

Hotkey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle cluli, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Niueteeu lluudred Fourteeu Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stock bridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. 1). Origgs, Piesident 

S. B. Freeborn, Manager 

L Edgar Smith, Manager 

E. H. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, .Manager 

( . Bokelimd, Manager 

J. W. T. Insure, Secretary 

Harold F. .Jones, Manager 

J. I). French. Manager 

E. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

IE M. Rogers. Manager 

L. (;. Davie*. President 

.1. L Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. MeDougall Presideut 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

'tandard fw 



Wright & Ditson Goods are the 
all sports 

WMIOMT As DITwIOM 

U* WaaMagtaa v t . Boston, Mass 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

<Jul<krat fwrvlc*-. ll. »i Work. UwmI l'rl<e 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, lirnts' overcoats, suits, pants ana 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suit* a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. J4» * 



CARS 



Leave AQOIE COLLEOE for HOI • 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Oentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock KVERY night 

Carnrr Amity and Ple»»«nt tt****S 



If you want to be 

HOL1U WITH Tllr: til It I J 
you must have yourclothea prea.*.! ami cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 

11 Amity *». Maroon Store 

Preening an.l Cleaning a sp-cUHy 

Moal literal ticket ayetein In town 

Tel. 303-II 



Leave AMHERST lor AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Care at Reasonable Rales 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. W. CO 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 18*4 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 1 

The Republican gives the best reports of 

Agricultural College and Amherst 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Daily, tf. Sunday, %2. Wttkly, V- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXI11. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January it, 1913. 



No. r5 



high scoREsjoNTiNUE SCARLET FEVER EPIDEMIC 

UNDER CONTROL 



Riflemen Register Totals of 959 and 954 
Against North Georgia and Princeton. 

The Massachusetts Aggie Kith* 
team secured the unusually high 
score of 9f>9 in its early season 
match against North Georgia univ. 1 
sity last Tuesday. While this was 
an unofficial score as given out l»y 
Sergeant Lett, ollicial judge at Aggie, 
his score is probably a iHMttl ¥»!■▼• 
one. The score of the first mutch of 
the year was high but this one is 
:. [.parentis- even better. The total 
score of 1H97 was high enough to 
have won the championship of the 
I nited States two years ago. Cup- 
tain Kdminster continues to shoot 
the remarkably high individual scores 
which characterized his work last 
r. In this match he led his team 
with a total of 1% out of a possible 
•200. Considering that the team has 
not yet beeu assigned a coach, pros- 
pects are very bright for a season 
.veil more successful than that <>f 
last vear. 



TWO CASES RESULT IN DEATH 

Prompt Action by Faculty and Health Officers Prevents Spread 

of Disease. North Amherst MilK Supply Believed 

to Have Been Source of Infection. 



The scores 



A. F. Edminster, 
, I) Griggs 
! I Dcrtel, 
W. C. Korbusl.. 

Clarke, 
F. F. Wlutlcmorc, 
I W. Dunbar, 
M, Headle, 
K. S. Weatherbee, 
G K Hyde, 

Total, 



Standing. 

97 

93 

9» 

9* 

9" 

9« 

9» 

90 

90 

»5 



"rone. I.t.i 



99 
99 

9* 
98 
99 
97 

98 
98 

98 



■9* 
19a 
191 

190 
190 
190 
189 
188 
188 
»»3 



914 083 "897 



Five highest scores, 959. 

HOCKEY SCHEDULE CHANGES 
Manager Little announces the fol- 
lowing changes in the Hockey sched- 
ule : — 
Harvard at Boston, Jan. 27, instead 

of the 25th. 
Amherst at Pratt Kink, Feb. I, 

This morning the hockey team left 
for Boston, where they will play two 
practice matches with the Pilgrim A. 
C in preparation for the game with 
Harvard. 

Coach Broder was called home la*1 

week. 



ALUMNI ATTENTION! 

The annual reunion and dinner of 

the II. A. C. Alumni club of Ma 

( husetts will be held at the Boston 

City club on Friday, Jan. It, at six 

.'. lock p. m. The College quartet 

vill be on hand to keep the music 

going. 

Hkubkkt L. Wiiitk '00, Sec. 



12.— Benjamin G. Southwick is 
farm manager of two large farms 
in Nazareth, Pa. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural 
college experienced a small panie 
Thursday, when I do/en cases of 
scarlet fever were reported among 
students and farm help during the 
morning and early afternoon. The 
Unit was a hurried consultation on 
Hkt part of the men and many of 
them left for their homes. President 
Uutterfield immediately riled <>p the 
situation and through his effort* the 
majority of the students were reached 
in time to prevent a general exodus. 
The president lost no time in put- 
ting the matter before the local health 
authorities and also communicated 
the feed to the state hoard of health. 
A conference was held in the after- 
noon, at which the slate and lo< al 
boards of health concuried in advis- 
ing that all student* remain in Am- 
Bat*, believing that they wee M 
more likely to contract the diseaae 
here than elsewhere. 

Late Thursday evening two more 
cases were reporte.l and M Friday 
morning the total number of those ill 
with the fever was increased to twen- 
ty-one. The seven eases which were 
discovered Friday had shown the first 
symptoms the day before, so that, in 
reality, Thursday was the day when 
all of these cases developed. 

The one big disadvantage lay in 
the lack of hospital facilities. The 
first two cases were cared for at Pratt 
hospital, the Amherst college in- 
firmary. As other cases were 
ported in rapid succession it was soon 
e\ident that some other arrangements 

must be made. 

The college authorities found the 
fraternities willing to turn over tli.it 
houses for hospitals or detention 
houses in case they were needed. 
The Kappa < lamina Fhi house on 
East Pleasant street, owing to its 
secluded situation, was immediately 
taken over as an isolation hospital. 
The Kappa Sigum ■*«* wa8 ,,,rlH ' (1 
illt o 1 detention hospital, where all 
who had been knowingly exposal 
to the disease might be quartered. 
The number of men conlined there 
the first day was twenty-five. 

Dr. Morse of Somerville, who WM 
assigned to the case as the represent- 
ative of the state board of health, 
arrived in Amherst Thursday after- 



noon. I n.ler the direction of Dr. 
Morse and Prof, links, the men who 
weir ill WO!* removed to the isolation 
hospital at (.lice. Five trained nurses 
were established there with full equip- 
ment, so that the men conlined there 
have bttd the very best of care. Two 
nurses were also placed in attendance 
:it the detention hospital to keep close 
watch oxer the nan there for signs of 
the first symptoms, should any of 
tho>e who have been exposed come 
dowu with the disease. 

Thursday night the campus was 
prett> generally deserted. It was 
gMHmtty f.a.ed that the college 
WOUld be foieeil to close for a longer 
01 shorter period. Many of the stu- 
dent* hat] visions of a long quaran- 
tine. The majority of the men. 
' eoidingly. left for Notthamplon ami 
Npimgtield. there to await develop- 
ments. When word was sent out 
that college excretes wen- to go on 
as usual the next morning the men 
returned 

Dr. Mo.se addressed the student- 
Friday morning at chapel. He ex- 
plained the disease and Hid that as 
long as it could be confined M OM 
locality it could be handled with cotn- 
aiveease. That is why, h- ntt, 
the men should remain in Amherst. 
Dr. Morse and Dr. Haskell spent the 
entire da\ looking after the ...... who 

were sick and examining those who 
were -uspeetc.l. (lasses were tem- 
porarily suspended tor one day. 

No new cases of scarlet fever de- 
veloped on Saturday among the stu- 
dents and no alarming symptoms 
manifested themselves among any ti 
the twenty-live men who had know- 
ingly been exposed and who were 
rpmrtere.l in the detention hospital. 
The doctors were perfectly sanguine 
thi.t further HfOadof the disease had 
been effectually checked. 

A student mass-meeting was held 
rlirectly after breakfast. The men 
uere unanimous in believing that a 
deflate statement should be forth- 
coming from the faculty in regard to 
college exercises, cuts, etc, during 
this week. A committee was ap- 
pointed to present the student side of 
tin- question to the facuHv. In the 
meantime l'resident Buttcrfield had 



SPRINGFIELD OUTPLAYED 

Team that Beat Williams Proves Easy 
for Maroon and White. 

The Massachusetts "Aggies" de- 
feated the Young Men's Christian 
association college on the college 
rink last Wednesday afternoon in a 
well-played hockey game, to «>. It 
MM hard-fought throughout, but the 
••Aggies" had the better of it all the 
way. In the first half there was no 
stopping the Massachusetts men, but 
in the second period the visitors 
tightened up their defense with the 
i .suit that but one shot reached the 
net. The -Aggie" defense proved 
impregnable. 

The ice was fairly good except 
around the edges of the rink, ami 
he., the water was about an inch 
,hep. Both teams .hveloped some 
last team play. The Bay Stater* 
hot exceptionally good in passing 
and working the puck up the surface 
i,,i ■ a shot at the net. When it 
eame to shooting, either Captain 
Hutchinson or '-Det" Jones wa* 
always on hand to receive the pa*B, 
and a goal usually resulted. IV 
combination spelled defeat for the 

visitor*. 

The game had no sooner begun 
than Hutchinson broke away with 
thf puck and carried it by the 
defence for the lirst point. Five 
minnlcs later he shot another ou a 
„e : ,t pass from IflMsV J""«* *■■ 
took I hand and rittVOd in two in 
,| succession. All this time 
llntm and Archibald were su<- 
. , nfsjgj staving off the ru*he* of 
Bowers, who wa* by far the roo*t 
aggressive Springfield player. 
Hutchinson shot his third goal just 
hefore the half ended. 

The visitors came back strong in 
the second session, but M. A. C. 
laid back and broke up all attempt* 
to score. Oi.ce or twice Brewer wa* 
called upon to deflect a *hot and 
ea-l, time arose to the occasion. 
Meade did K<hm1 w»'k for Springfield 
in this half and only one shot got by 
him. This was a pretty *hot by 
,|„ncs from the fat corner of the 
rink. The play continued fast and 
interesting to the end. 

'The line-up : 
M A { . V. M. C. A. COLLKOK. 

brewer, g J Meade 

Archibald, Little, p P, Patterson 

Needham, cp cp. Cochran (capt ) 

Hutchinson (capt), c c, Kadie, Taylor 
Jones, r '• ^.r. 

Johnson, Iw "»• U * rke 

(hisholm.rw Iw, Ells, Carson 

Score-M. A. C. 6, International Y. M. 
C. A. College o. r.oals- Hutchinson 3; 
Jones v Keferee— Uenesha of Amherst 
College. Umpire- Affleck of Sprmu 



I Continued on P**a 2 J 



field. Timers- Morse of M. A. C. and 
Carpenter of Amherst. Time-»o-mm 
ute halves. 






I 



I 






















The College Signal, Tuesday, January si, 1913. 



SCARLET FEVER 

[Continued from page l] 



called the instructors together to dis- 
cuss the general situation. This was 
outlined by the specialist from the 
state board of health, Dr. Morse, and 
also by President Butterfield. The 
committee representing the student 
body then appeared before the faculty 
asking for some action. After a 
somewhat long discussion, the follow- 
ing resolutions were adopted: — 

1. That college exercises be con- 
tinued as usual on Monday and there- 
after. 

2. That the final examination 
schedule be postponed one week. 

I. That every consideration will 
be shown those students necessarily 
absent from recitations this coming 
week. No student should leave town 
before consulting the board of health. 

4. That special effort be made to 
perfect the precautionary measures of 
detention in co-operation with the 
board of health. 

5. That a special committee be 
immediately arranged to assist in ad- 
justing sleeping and living conditions 
for the students. 

By adopting these resolutions, the 
faculty made the local board of 
health responsible for all men leaving 
town from now on. The resolutions 
also made it possible for parents to 
use their own judgment as to whether 
their sons should remain in Amherst 
or go to their own homes until tin- 
exact outcome of the epidemic is 
known. I)i. Morse, Dr. Haskell of 
the local board of health, and Presi- 
dent Butterfield, united in an appeal 
to the men to remain iu college, being 
perfectly sanguine that the situation 
was very hopeful. 

Sunday morning brought the sad 
news of the death of Warner H. 
Hurt '16, of Longmeadow at the isola- 
tion hospital. His case had been al- 
most hopeless from the very begin- 
ning, owing to complications caused 
by chronic kidney trouble. Although 
his family doctor and a special nurse 
did their best to give him relief, his 
temperature had continued to rise. 
He was delirious during the night and 
died at 5. Mo Sunday morning. Mr. 
Burt came immediately from Spring- 
field, where the funeral was held yes- 
terday afternoon. 

The second victim of the epidemic 
was Kdward Woodman, Jr., of Port- 
land, Me., who died Monday morn- 
ing. He appeared to be improving, 
but when the crisis came, complica- 
tions set in and he sank rapidly. 
Woodman was a sophomore, having 
entered this fall from the University 
of Maine. He was a member of the 
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 

The other men are all getting along 
finely. They are painfully but, un- 
less complications set in, are not 
dangerously sick. The majority of 
the cases are light. 

The fresh men and underclassmen 
rooming off the campus have been hit 
hardest by the disease. Only one 



case has developed among the men 
rooming in the dormitories. Follow- 
ing are the names of the men who 
are now suffering from the fever : 
David A. Coleman '14, of South Fra- 
mingham ; Ralph K. Davis '14, of 
Southbury, Ct. ; Joseph S. Pike T">, 
of Somerville ; Paul W. Rhoades '!.'», 
of Maiden; Stuart C. Vinal '15, of 
Fast Weymouth; A. E. Wilkins '15, 
of Wakefield ; Linus Jones '16, of 
Milford ; Knight Quincy '16, of Ros- 
li m laic ; Frederic Stearns '16, of 
Waltham ; Arthur W. Taylor '14, of 
Feeding Hills ; Finest C. Russell '16, 
of South Hadley; Walton G. Kil- 
boum short course, of South Lancas- 
ter ; Thomas V. Cannon short course, 
of Newton ; Anbrey W. Borden short 
course, of South Framingham ; Ralph 
('. Doran short course, of North 
Dartmouth; Fred Fenn short course, 
of Westminster, Vt. ; Rupert G. 
Gates instructor, of New Haven, Ct. ; 
John Green teamster, of Amherst; 
George ('. Day short course, of West 
Kcnnehunk, Me. 

Davis was taken ill while visiting 
in Springfield and is confined in a 
hospital there. Russell was at his 
home in South Hadley when he be- 
came ill. The parents of all of the 
men who are sick were sent the full 
facts immediately in a personal letter 
from President Ruttcrfield. The par- 
ents and guardians of all students are 
being kept in touch with the exact 
situation by means of letters sent out 
from the president's office. 

The source of the infection is not 
known. Since a)' of ths men who 
have been taken ill hoarded at the 
Dining hall, it would seem that the 
infection must have come from there. 
Scarlet fever has been prevalent in 
North Amherst even before the 
Christinas holidays. The milk used 
at the Dining hall comes from this 
section, and this is the reason for its 
being suspected. It is now being 
thoroughly sterilized and pasteurized, 
so that infection can no longer come 
from that source. Russell, however, 
was the first victim of the fever, and 
he had not been at the Dining hall 
for three weeks, having just returned 
from Washington, D. C. 

Full confidence has been restored 
and the work of the college is pro- 
gressing as well as can be expected. 
I^ess than one-third of the entire stu- 
dent Inxly have gone to their homes, 
and, so far as can be learned, none 
of the men who are now at home 
have fallen sick. Of course, there 
can be no assurance that there will 
not be other cases, but it is expected 
that these will be comparatively few. 

Monday afternoon, Dr. Morse of 
the state board of health, released 
26 of the suspects from the Kappa 
Sigma house. This was not done 
until a very thorough examination 
had been given all of the men. This 
leaves three students in the detention 
hospital. Two of these are definitely 
known tohavetonsilitis. They show 
absolutely no symptoms of scarlet 
fever and are merely detained as the 



The College Signal, Tueafay. January 21, 19.3- 



CLOSING OUT SALE ! 

Skates and Skating Shoes 



$4 50 Skates, 
$3.00 Skates, 
52.00 Skates, 
$3.50 Shoes, 
$3.00 Shoes, 



Now $3.50 
Now $2.25 
Now $1.50 
Now $2.85 
Now $2.20 



Pages Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Pone 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 




CDe 
pheasant 

BmttB St., 
Bmber*t 

Telephone 470 



J! 



■RBAKKAST 
LUNCH POM 
AKTHRNOON T»A 

l»inner if arranged for. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

PUIaMpMa's Official Fratemltj Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOM 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Orncs Hours: 
etolBA.M. LtiOtoSP.M. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Reuaonable K**t«*»- 



.XIlV>i. .Yl.l>i;:v 

House Next to Laundry. 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



Ml Student Supplies 



Fall k Winter Suits k Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order A Ready to Wear Suits 

Latest Styles 
in Mackinaws 



M . A. C » TORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANDY TONIC 

Kl.lridge'ia Kendall "i6 



hospital is considered the test place 
for them. It is expected that the 
third man will be released today. 
Although believed to be entirely free 
from the malady he was detained 
simply as an additional precaution. 

The significant fact in connection 
with the epidemic is that not 
a single case has developed at the 
Kappa Sigma house since the first 
day of the epidemic. Ab all of the 
men who were confined there, were 
under suspicion because of the pos- 
sible danger of infection derived 
from personal contact with those 
who hud contracted the disease, this 
goes to show that another outbreak 
is highly improbable, as the original 
cause of the epidemic has been 
removed. 

Those remaining in the Kappa 
Sigma house are K. S Neale '13, A. 
I.. Oertel MB and 1>. K. Dodge a 
special student. B. 0. Whiddeu M4, 
entered the detention hospital yester- 
day afternoon; it in Mieved he is 
suffering from tonsilitis. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 
The men confined in the Kappa 
Sigma house the past few days wish 
to publicly express their apprecia- 
tion to the president, faculty and 
students of the college for the 
thoughtful care and attention given 
them while detained. 

C. P. Sl'OrHiUO, * 

I). Williams, V Committee. 
II. Nimbn, ) 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Mass. 

H. B. WHITE 'IS. Agent 

10 Allen Street 




Good Disinfectants For Good Health ! ! 



There are subjects 
upon which it is easier 
to draw out the thread 
of verbosity than the 
staple of argument. 

Not so with 



To insure absolute sanitation and healthfulness, a good disin- 
fectant is necessary. A few cents invested in a disinfectant that 
will meet your particular requirements, will enable you to cast all 
doubt aside and insure yourself against contagion. Protect your- 
health by disinfecting thoroughly. We have many good disin- 
fectants, each manufactured with a view to fully meet different 
particular conditions. 

Solution of Chloride, Chloride of Lime, 
Formaldehyde, Sulphur Candles, Creolin, 
Carbolic Acid and many others. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

T?l*#3 R13X Ar*r* Store On tne Corner 





Velvet furnishes its 
own best argument. 
You draw it out of a 
pipe in great cool 
delightful puffs — so 
temptingly smooth 
and satisfying that it 
leaves no chance for 
dispute. 



g MydE ^Py»t»t^i 



STUDENTS LEAVE. 
Last Thuisduy marked I day of 
mat unrest among M Aggie " stu- 
dents. Following elosely upon the 
chapel announcement that Knight 
Quincy, 191ft wits the second student 
victim of leaflet fever, came later 
morning reports of other cases. The 
college administrative officers grasped 
the impending situation and dropped 
their current work to meet it prompt- 
The first announcement affecting 
the student hotly came from the 
President's office, declaring Satur- 
day's Informal cancelled. Managers 
of the various student organizations 
were also requested to confer with 
faculty officers relative to the cancell- 
ation of immediate dates. 

Karly afternoon classes found 
many absentees at roll-call. Prompt 
appropriation of several fraternity 
houses lessened afternoon attendance 
still further. It was necssary for 
students rooming in these houses to 
pack a few things hurriedly, and, 
with the street as general headquar- 
ters to seek other lodging places. 
Later in the afternoon a rumor of 
general quarantine circulated among 
the students. That perfectly healthy 
students should Ire included in a quar- 
antine for an indefinitely long period 
met with emphatic objections from 
them. As a result, the homeless 
student*, ami others, determined to 
be outside the quarantine zone when 
the State Health officer arrived in 
the evening. The evening meal hour 
found the college dining hall practi- 
cally deserted, and the student* eon- 
gregated in neighboring towns. As 
soon as it was definitely known that 
there would lie no immediately quar- 
antine the students returned to take 
up regular work. They had no in- 
tention of creating even imaginary 
alarm in surrounding communities, 
but rather they were anxious that the 
next two or three weeks would not 
find them uselessly confined to their 

rooms. 

Friday ami Saturday found little 
diminution of those who had returned. 
but Sunday, Monday and Tuesday 
found an increasingly large number 
of men leaving. Hv telephone, tele- 
graph and mail, inquiries came in 
from worried parents and anxious 
friends, and Monday evening found 
those eating at the dining hall l» 
dnced to one fourth of the usual 
number. The death of Woodman 
following so closely u\h,u that of 
Hurt did much to add to the general 
nervousness and unrest which hung 
like a cloud over the student body. 

Classes are running with very small 
attendance and all preliminary ex- 
aminations have been postponed. 

Such in brief is the story of the 
exodus that has left but a third of the 
student body remaining in college. 



KAPPA BETA PHI 

Keeling the need of an honorary 
senior society, such as exists at 
many colleges, that shall take into 
consideration the merits of I man 
independent of his scholastic stand- 
ing and shall afford some means of 
publicly recognizing such ■ If 

members of the class of ll>l!> ui.vc 
instituted a chapter of Kappa Beta 
Phi at the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. The society is not in 
any way in opposition to or antag- 
onistic to any existing fraternity or 
society as may he seen by the fol- 
lowing statement of its general 
purposes : — 

1. To promote good feeling among 
the members of diverse fraternities 
and the non-fraternity men of the 

college. 

2, To recognize by election |0 
the society such seniors as may Ire- 
come eligible by service to college or 

class. 

:t. To promote and strengthen 
the ties binding the alumni to the 

college. 

4. To encourage all movements 
looking for the betterment of the 
college. 



Kappa Beta Phi, the honorary 
senior society held an informal sup- 
per in Northampton, Wednesday 
evening. 



To help keep college and el 
politics clean ami promote the idea 
of the "square deal." 

The insignia of the fraternity is a 
gold key bearing the (Jreek letters 
Kappa Phi. Among the insti- 
tutions having chapters are Williams, 
( ornell and Amherst 

The following seniors are mem- 
he rs : Biidsall. (lark. (ovill, Klls, 
Fay, Jordan, Jones, Little, Mailed, 
Murray, Koehrs, Van Zwalenburg, 
Xabriskie. 

ASSEMBLY 
The college was fortunate in ob- 
taining George T. Powell, president 
of the Agricultural F.xpert*' Associa- 
tion of New Y..rk, to address the 
assembly on Wednesday. Mr. Pow- 
ell is known MM the entire country 
as our most expert horti«nlturali.Ht; 
ami his articles on rural life and 
rural problems, written twenty years 
ago, were pioneers in one of the most 
significant movements of the day. 
•The Country Home" and "The 
Fruit Orchard," written by Mr. Pow- 
ell, are without doubt the most fas- 
cinating "back to-the-farm" Irooks 
,,t written. (Jiving as they do the 
results of the author's own efforts on 
his small farm in central New York, 
these Irooks are so entertainingly 
written that one wants to jump 
immediately for the next train and 
betake himself to spade and pruning 
shears out in the real countiy and 
taste the joys of real existence for 

a while. 

Mr. Powell's talk dwelt 00 the in- 
ception and growth of agriculture in 
the United States during the nine- 
teenth century, and on the great 
need of the present for more co- 
operation and economic investigation 
into the needs of the farmer and of 
the farming community. 












The College Signal, Tuesday, January si, 1913. 



THE COLLE GE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. H.VANZWALF.NBURG»i3.F.ditor in-Chief 
CHESTER K.VVIIKKLKR'u.ManaKinstEditor 
OSCAR G. ANDERSON 'n. Assistant Editor 
FREDERICK D. ORIOGS '13. Athletic Editor 
S. MILLER JORDAN '13, 
HARRY W. ALLEN '13. 
STUART B. FOSTER *!*, 
ERVINE F. PARKER '14, 
HAROLD C. BLA<:k 'u. 
J.ALBERT PRICE '15. 



Athletic Editor 
Alumni BdHot 
Cimpus Editor 
Alumni Fditor 
Department Editor 
Associate Editor 
GEORGE E. DONNEI.L *iS. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 2d. '13, Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S.CLAKK.IR.'uAsst.Hus.Manager 
ERNEST F.UPTON '14. Aist. Adv. ManaRer 
MAURICE J. CLOIGH '15, Circulation 



Subscription $1 50 per vear. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie 2nd. 

Entered u Mcond-c<aM ratter at the Amherst 



Vol. XXIII. Tuesday, Jan. 21. No. 15 



Mid-year examinations have bass 
postponed one week. With these 
once over, commencement will lit' 
upon ns all too quickly Growing 
dissatisfaction with commencement 
exercises as held here in previous 
years, has culminated in action by 
the Senior class looking toward the 
arrangement of a program that 
should result in added dignity and 
picturesqneness for the ceremonies, 
and increased interest on the part of 
students and friends of the college 
Any movement having this aim in 
view should receive the hearty sup- 
port of both students and faculty. 



Tiik resignation of Marquis F. 
Dickinson of Brookline and Amherst, 
as a trustee of the college, owing to 
failing health will bring regret to all 
connected with the institution. Mr. 
Dickinson, while occupied by his 
many business interests, has yet al- 
ways found time to labOT unceasingly 
for the advancement of the college. 
It is to be hoped that Oovcrnor Foss 
will see his way clear to appoint as 
bis successor one whose enthusi.-i>ui 
will be as unchecked by political pre- 
judice. The Massachusetts Agricult- 
ural College has had no more faithful 
friend in its history and the work 
which Mr. Dickinson has done should 
be long remembered. 



In the present day rush to accom- 
plish big things, people are prone to 
over-look the little details that, after 
all, have so much to do with the suc- 
cess or failure of larger undertakings. 
Undergraduates at M. A. C. suffer 
from this common failing , and one 
logical outcome of it, obtrudes more 
or less unpleasantly upon the con- 
sciousness at chapel exercises. We 
refer to the noise made in returning 
song books to their racks at the con- 
clusion of singing. It might almost 
seem unnecessary to mention the oc- 
currence to men of college age but for 
the increasing racket at both Sunday 



and daily chapel. It cannot help hut 
create an unfavorable impression in 
the minds of outside speakers or 
visitors who may be present. Is it 
necessary? A little laoughtfnlneH 
on the part of students, especially 
the freshmen, will remove this source 
of annoyance. 



Now that the first uncertainty and 
anxiety has passed, we are able to 
fain a clearer idea of the fever situa- 
tion at M. A. C. The prompt and 
efficient work of faculty, state and 
local health boards has checked what 
threatened to become a most serious 
menace to the college and the town. 
In this connection, the untiring efforts 
of Professor Hicks deserve special 
mention. To the fraternities who so 
promptly placed their houses at the 
disposal of the college grateful ae- 
kowledgement should be made. The 
situation is well in hand, the source 
of the infection has been removed 
and if the present improvement is 
maintained, the alarm first felt will 
soon have no foundation. Trying 
circumstances such as these bring out 
unexpected qualities in men and this 
has been no exception. For those 
to whom suffering and sorrow has 
come as | result of the outbreak, we 
can but express our sincere sympathy. 



which prevented the reader from get- 
ting my full meaning. This had 
reference to the table on page six 
and stated that "the following sug- 
gestions concerning the chemical 
courses best suited to be taken in 
connection with major courses olfur 
i/m,i rli,„u'si,>/ are made." In other 
words, it is understood that students 
majoring in chemistry will be ex- 
pected to take substantially all of the 
courses. The suggestions offered in 
the table apply to students majoring 
in other subjects. 

J. B. LlM»K.Y. 



Have Your Shoes Repaired Will) 



OUR SPECIAL. 



Tiik opening of the new Legisla- 
ture and the inauguration of the gov- 
ernor again brings to us the annual 
question as to what will he the share 
of M. A. C. this year when the 
budget, as given in the recent rejxjrt 
of the president, is presented for 
action. Judging from the governor's 
past attitude in vetoing every bill 
concerned with the college, the out- 
look is not encouraging, but we ear- 
nestly hope that once during three 
years he may be lenient and grant us 
the proposed agricultural building. 
The intlueiice of the college which is 
felt through the entire state should 
he rewarded by the granting of the 
increased money petitioned for also. 

We surely agree most heartily with 
the Boston Trmtstrijil when it says, 
"The attitude of the governor toward 
the college has been one of suspicion 
and unfriendliness, even when an 
expert of his own appointment had 
reported favorably upon its require- 
ments. Curiously enough, though 
the college has been open to students 
for nearly forty-five years, it lias 
never had a building devoted specif- 
ically to agricultural teaching. 
Othci buildings are needed but the 
request for money to build them is 
postponed in order to give the right 
of way to the more pressing need." 

COMMUNICALION. 

TO TIIK FlMTOR OF TlIK SlONAI.. 

Dear Sir: 

In my cominunicatian of last week's 
Skjxal relative to the chemical de- 
partment of the college, one sentence 
was left out by you or by the printer 



NORTH R1PT0N 



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Wed. and Sat. Mats, at 2:15 

Prices 25c and 50c 



Wear- proof Sole Lea a iter 



Costs you no more than the ordinary 
kind — will wear nearly twice as long. 



Prompt Service Strictly 
First-class Work. 



E. M. BOLLES 



THE SHOEMAN 



Coolep's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



Write Ideas for Moving Picture Plays ! 



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The demand for photo plays is practically unlimited. The big film 
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We have received many letters fiom the film manufacturers, such as 
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send photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets of success. 

We are selling photo plays written by people who " never 
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Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
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NATIONAL AUTHORS' 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



The College Signal, Tuesday. January^ 21, 19' 3- 



M. A. C. '71 

M. A. C. '00 

M. A. C. '11 

M. I. T. '08 



GOOD MEN from these classes had a hand In !«»«*■«*! 

material used in our interesting book, "THE ANSWER. 

IIVw/ is "The Answer f" 

A pamphlet that means much to any student of agri- 
culture. Particularly so if he can read "between the 
lines." Mailed free to any address. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A 



MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimcr's 

Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 







COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Signal concerning 
matters of general interest are welcomed. The 
Signal is not to be held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

Editors ok Tiik College Signal : — 
Dear Sirs : 

In the issue of Tiik Signal for 
Nov. Hi iyi2 you state, in discuss- 
ing the question of Senate recogni- 
tion, that the recognition by the col- 
lege of the fraternity as a political 
element would be most unwise. 

It is true that the province of the 
fraternity should be purely social, but 
do the fraternities at our college al- 
ways keep within their proper sphere? 
It is generally recognized that they 
do not, but exert a powerful influence 
ui>on all elections to offices of trust 
and representation. Were it not liet- 
ter that we publicly recognize the 
fraternities as a political unit, grant- 
ing each equal representation in the 
senate ? I^et the non-fraternity men 
have some part to play in the student 
government, allowing them represen- 
tation according to numbers. 

It appears unnecessary to make 
the proposed reorganized body un- 
wieldy. Would not one delegate 
from each fraternity be enough? 
Necessity does not demand cither, 
that the heads of student Mlllrttkl 
be members of the Senate. They 
can be called into consultation when- 
ever necessary, as was customary 
umler the old regime. 

Shall the widely known and highly 
landed democratic spirit of Aggie 
decline lieforc the strengthening power 
of the fraternities, ami our beloved 
Alma Mater he looked u|h>u M an 
institution where fraternity spirit 
rather than college spirit predomi- 
nates? Such a cendition of affairs 
would I* dephuahle. 1*1 us imme- 
diately take the step* necessary to 
assure a demon at i< r< presentation 
in that most important student body, 
the Senate. 

Sincerely yours, 

A N<»N-KKVTKKMTY rNUBKOKALOATR. 



library during the school year. 
Immediately upon receipt here they 
will be posted upon the bulletin board 
just outside the reading room. 
These bulletins will be very interest- 
ing as they give to our faculty 
ami students advance notice concern- 
ing musical affairs, vesper speakers, 
adresses by people of note and other 
college activities. 

EXTENSION. 

Following is a list of the courses 
offered by the extension department : 
Apple packing school, Jan 23-21*. 
Fanners' week, March 17-21. 
Polish farmers' day, March 27. 
Beekeepers' course, May 2H-Juue 11. 
Beekeepers' convention, .June 11-12. 
Summer school, July 1-21*. 
Conference for rural community lead- 
ers, July 29-Aug. 1. 
Poultry convention, July 28-30. 



That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C A. it. 

, Sole Aicerat 




OVERCOATS 

• j »u- .„.,«. A«k the other fellow how he liked his. 

We made a hundred this season. ask tne oirrci ic 

DRESS SUITS 

-We make them all and make them right at- 
College Store*. 








DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LANO-SAl'K DEPARTMENT. 

The juniors in lands* ape under Mr 
Harrison's direction recently made a 
survey ami laid out the projiosed 
athletic field. This is to l>e east of 
the Veterinary Lalioratory and is to 
include a football field, baseball with 
grandstands and bleachers, tennis 
courts, out of door tracks, ate. 

A new edition of Professor Waugh's 
"Landscape hardening" has just 
been issued by the publishers, Orange 
JuddCo.,of New York. The first 
edition, published 12 years ago has 
l>een widely used as a text-book in 
Colleges and has had a large sale. 
In its new form it is considerably 
improved. 

I.IHRARY. 

Arrangements have been made 
with the officers at Mt. Holyoke and 



ALUMNI NOTES 

CLASS OK 1905. 

R L Adams, (M. Sc.) general 
ranch superintendent for Miller & 
Lux. Buttonwillow, Cal. 

<;. II. Allen, general fruitgrower. 
Highland, Cal, San Bernardino 
county. 

II. L. Barnes, general farmer. 
Lakeview Farm. "Interlaken,"Stock- 
bridge. 

K. A. Bartlett, president of Frost 
& Bartlett Co., Stamford, Ct. 

II. D. Crosby, farmer. Rutland. 
Father C. Cushman, assistant at 
Ammary Brown Memorial. 21 Brown 
St., Providence, R. I. 

J. J. Gardner, instructor in pomo- 
logy- University of Illinois, I rhana, 
III." 

U. V. (lay, forester. Itl F. Front 
St.. Plainfield, N. I. 

W. B. Hatch, landscape architect, 
secretary and treasurer of Rhode 
Inland Country Club, Nyatt, R. I. 

C. S. Holcomb, teacher of voice. 
School of Fxpreasion, Pierce Bldg. 
( ..pely Sipiare, Boston. 

T. Francis Hunt, extension de- 
partment, University of California. 
Berkeley, California. 

N. I). Ingham, lemon growing. 

I^fflngwell Ranch. Whittier, Cal. 

|, R Kelton, teacher in high 

school. 3. r > Pearl St., Amsterdam, 

N. Y. 

F. T. Ladd, chemist with Baugh 
Chemical Co., Ml Falls Road Ter- 
races. Roland Park, Md. 

C. W. Lewis, 43 Lynde Street, 
Melrose. Farm superintendnt Long 
Island Hospital, Boston. 

J. F. Lyman, (Ph. D.,) assistant 
professor of chemistry. Ohio uni- 
versity, 1345 Highland St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

W. A. Munson, fruitgrower, Mun- 
aon & Frost Company. Littleton. 

E. W. Newhall, Newhall I^and and 
Farming Co., 260 California Street, 



Smith so that the weekly bulletins of 

the two colleges will be sent to our San Francisco, Cal. 






I •'. 










The College Signal, Tuesday, January 21, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 21, 1913* 












G. W. Patch, purchasing agent, 
Brown-Durrell Company, 104 Kings- 
ton Street, Boston. 

Mrs. Monica Tuft Sanborn, Brook 
Farm, Northlield, Vt., R. t. D. No. 
4. 

W. M. Sears, with Krost «& Bart- 
lett Co., Stamford, Conn. 

A. N. Swain, tree surgeon unci 
horticulturist, 623 Tremont Bldg., 
Boston. 

A. I). Taylor, (M.Sc.) landscape 
architect, with Warren II. Manning, 
1101 Tremont Bldg., Boston. 

II. F. Tompson, Thompson Bros., 
fruit growers. K. F. D. No. 4. At- 
tleboro. 

B. Tupper, dairy industry, Venice, 
Cal. 

L. S. Walker, chemist, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural Fxpcriment Sta- 
tion. 19 Phillips Street. Amherst. 

C. L Whitaker, Mouroe-Whita- 
ker Co., offices Bostou, New York, 
Chicago. 103 Union Avenue, Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. 

<;. N. Willis, resident engineer on 
highway construction, with Massa- 
chusetts Highway Commission. *2 
Bi. .infield Boad, West Sumerville. 

F. L. Ycaw, assistant professor of 
market gardening. M. A. ('., Am- 
herst. 

Kx. ItOd. 

Clarence K. Brett, student, lihode 
State College. Kingston, K. I. 

Chester M. Carter, florist with 
Simonds Floral Co., Barre. 

K. C. Bruce, U Stone Street, Clif- 
tondale. 

F. F. Hutchings, superintendent 
of schools. Saybrook. 

Wm. J. O'Neil, pattern maker 
with I'nited Shoe Machinery Co., 
II Grant Street, Beverly. 

K. K. Huntington, publicity depart- 
ment, Alden Scare's Sons Co., Sixth 
street, Cambridge. 

A. K. Paul, horticulture ami fruit 
growing. Belvidere, N.J. 

J. C. Richardson, owner of Beaver 
Brook Farm. Truck Gardening, 701 
Mammoth Road. Dracut. 

Compiled by A. I). Taylor, Nect'y, 
Class of 190.'). 

'71. — W. II. Bowker is the author 
of an article on the editorial page of 
the Boston Sunday CROSS for January 
12, entitled: "Who Fixes the Price 
of Food Stuffs?" 

'82.— Prof. C. S. Plumb, now at 
the head of the department of ani- 
mal husbandry of Ohio State univer- 
sity, Columbus, Ohio, and author of 
"Types and Breeds of Farm Ani- 
mals" and the recently published 
"Beginnings in Animal Husbandry" 
from the press of The Webb Publish- 
ing Company of St. Paul, Minn., 
enjoys the distinction of recently 
having been asked by the imperial 
department of agriculture of Russia 
to allow the translation of his "Types 
:md Breeds of Farm Animals" into 



the Russian language, with a request 
that he prepare the preface for the 
edition. (Tinn & Company the 
publishers of the work have been 
engaged to prepare the cuts for 
the illustration of the book. Many 
of these are from original photo- 
graphs taken by the author in this 
country and abroad. 

'88**07 — In the science notes of 
the Srientijir Ainirimn for Jan. 11, 
mention is made of the elaborate ex- 
periments which have been conducted 
by l>r. (J. K. Stone, '8f> and George 
II. Chapman, i>7 on the electrical re- 
sistance of trees. 

*88 and *8ft. — At the farmers week 
and country life convention hehl by 
the Montana Agricultural oollega s( 

Bo/.eiii.in.Jan. 88-80, F.S.Cooley '*8 
state superintendent of farmers insti- 
tutes. Spofce on "Teaching Kleim-n- 
tary Agriculture" and "The Farm 
Boy." R. A. OOOIS? '»•'•. state ento- 
mologist and profSSOW of zoology 
ami entomology at the Mate college, 
gave an illustrated talk on "Insect 
and Human Diseases." 

'8«.»._I)r. Burt L. Jlaitwell of 
Kingston, B. I., has been appointed 
director of the Rhode Island experi- 
ment station to succeed Homer J. 
Wheeler *88. Aftei graduation Mr. 
Hartwell spent two years ;i- assistant 
chemist in the Massachusetts experi- 
ment station In Ik'.U he was ap- 
pointed first assistant at the Rhode 
Island experiment station, in 190 
assoeiate, in ll>M7 chemist, and in 
llMih professor of agricultural chem- 
istry in the college. 

'03. — Albert Parsons has returned 
with his family from Haiku. Main, 
Hawaiian Islands, and is living for 
the present at North Amherst. 

'O.'i. — Clarence W. Lewis was mar- 
ried on Dec. _'•*,. to Miss Anna K. 
Barrett. Address 13 Lyndc street, 
Melrose. 

'of.. — H. M. Russell has been trans- 
fercd from work on truck crops and 
stored product insects to cereal and 
forage insect investigation under the 
l. S. Bureau of Kntomology. Russell 
left early in this month for Salt Lake 
City to take charge there of the work 
on the parasites of the alfalfa wec\il. 
Hi- address, care Alfalfa \Vec\il 
Lal>oratory, Salt Lake City. 

— II. M. Russell is the author of a 
Bulletin 88. part II on Th, Bftt- 
fi<nnl('<l 'r/iiijix issued by ths I'. S. 
Bureau of Entomology in December. 
The bulletin is a preliminary account 
to prepare growers of the mango and 
avocardo in Florida and California 
to combat the new pest. 

'07. — Fied A. Watkins was a re- 
cent visitor at college. Mr. Wat- 
kins has been recently appointed 
milk inspector in Milhury, where he 
is engaged in farming. 

'<>7. — It is the intention of the 
Secretary to declare that F. A. Wat- 
kins is the true and lawful owner of 
the Class Cup unless evidence is pre- 
sented before Feb. 1'ith that some 
other member is entitled to it. 



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Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



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CAMPUS NOTES 

Professor Hicks led a "fresh-air 
ike" Sunday morning for those 

ill lit ions ones wbo did nol bear tbe 
•call of tbe couutry eburcb " 

The college sharp-shooters started 
. .ff the rifle season in good shape by 
anging up the highest score in both 
.astern and western leaugues. 

Warm weather has again inter- 
ned with the hockey schedule but 
Manager Little hopes to play one 
or two more games before the season 
.lids. 

The Musical clubs will not appear at 
Turners Falls, Thursday evening un- 
der the auspices of the High school, 
■wing to the action of the local board 
of health. 

Harold F. .lones 'If, manager of 
the Uoister Doister has Keen absent 
from college owing to an attack of 
tousilitis contracted upon his return 
fiom Mexico. 

Wantkii : — Information regarding 
the wherealiouts of the following 
members of the Si«;n\i. staff — editor- 
in-chief, managing editor, depart- 
ment editor, campus editor and office 
Itoys. No reward offered. 

Kenney *18 earned the displeasure 
of the hockey management by going 
through the ice in the rink, while 
-.kitting, Sunday morning. After due 
•nsideration, the management fished 
him out. Good work, Waugh. 

For some reason or other, our 
journalistic contemporary to the 
south devotes considerable space in 
its columns to the doings of the Aggie 
hockey players. .lones, Hutchinson 
lad Needham have come in for 
special mention. 

Those seniors who have succumbed 
to the courses in agricultural econom- 
ies during their stay in college were 
forcibly reminded of the familar term 
-rural exodus" when the outward 
movement of students took place 
Thursday afternoon. 

"Distance only lends enchant- 
ment" — Examinations are but an airy 
obstacle, an easily scaled hurdle for 
those strong hearted ones who are 
looking forward to "the time, the 
place and — well you know the rest. 
A junior prom comes but once a year. 

It is rumored that the action of 
Treasurer Kenney's office staff has 
•erloanfa depleted the available sup- 
ply of smelling salts. Experts claim 
that considerable skill is required to 
revive drooping spirits with one hand 
I pound a typewriter with the 
other. 

The engagement of the Roister 
l'oisters for North Brookfield, last 
I i iday night, was cancelled by assis- 
tant manager Lewis owing to the 
1 let fever epidemic. A. K. Wil- 
t, To, who has been taking the 
role of Nancy in the •« New Boy " is 
>ng those ill with the fever and 
M. J. Clough, '1">, is understudying 
the part in preparation for the Green- 
I Id and Northampton appearances. 



With the evacuation of the Kappa 
Sigma, Kappa Gamma Phi and ('. S. 
C. houses the former inmates found 
theinselver homeless until taken in by 
kind hearted friends. A timely 
article on "Congestion of student 
population caused by inadequate dor- 
mitory accommodations ** would no 
doubt prove attracticv and instructive 
reading for his excellency. 



ST0CKBRIDGE CLUB 

Ccorge T. Powell, president of the 
Agricultural Experts' association, 
New York, proved to be the most 
interesting speaker of the year, when 
he talked last Tuesday night on 
"Specialization." He suggested the 
following rotation of fruits during 
the year on a fruit farm : strawber- 
ries, raspberries, currants, cherries, 
pears and apples. For apple varie- 
ties, Mr. Powell recommended thai 
only those of universal demand be 
commercially planted I Baldwin, 
Rhode Island Greening, Northern 
Spy (on shaley. gravelly land, with 
high elevation), and Mcintosh. The 
following early bearing apples were 
suggested for fillers: Yellow Trans- 
parent. Bad Astrachan, Dutchess, 
Wealthy. For home use. a tree 
apiere of twenty or thirty other sorb* 
should be planted. In figuring up 
the cost of a fruit-farm, Mr. I'owell 
estimated that, at $."»() |»er acre, the 
land would cost $200 per acre by the 
sixth year, when some definite return 
may be looked for. Besides this, a 
working capital of $2.1 |>er acre 
should be on hand. One of his 
statements came as a complete sur- 
prise to most of the men : that Bhode 
Island (ireeuiugs are outselling any 
other apples in New York today. 

XI green" greenings are selling 

for $f> per bushel at retail ; but they 
must be of the best and really <j>- 
Here is something for Baldwin grow- 
ers to think about. 



Washington defeated lxmisiana, 870 

to 83ft. 
West Virginia defeated Kansas, H'.Kl 

to 786. 
Purdue defeated Wisconsin, h;h to 

881. 

Minnesota defeated Nebraska, 1*11 

to 77i». 
Iowa dtftated California, 880 toll 
(default). 
I'nited States Yet. SurgeoiiB defeated 

Missouri, 717 to (default). 



LEADS THEM ALL 

The first official rifle team scons 
were received from Secretary .lones 
of the National rifle association late 
Saturday evening and show Massa- 
chusetts 1* points in the bad of 
Harvard university, which team hits 
the second highest score of 'J.'>*. 
Iowa leads the western league with a 
score of '.».'{»> Than •ooreeeore* 
only the first matches. The results 
for lK)th leagues follow : 

KASTKKN M V'.l I- 

Cornell defeated Clemson, *8* to 7*f*>. 
Columbia defeated Maine. MM to*2!». 
Dartmouth defeated Hhode Island, 

MKU to ~i'M\. 

Harvard defeated Princeton, MM to 
010. 

North Georgia defeated Lehigh, 
M7:& to 71*. 

Massachusetts Aggies defeated Nor- 
wich, MM .©881. 

Massachusetts Tech defeated Ver- 
mont, :»07 to 888. 

n garni Muewi. 

Michigan Aggies defeated Oklahoma 
Aggies, 897 to 825. 



TRACK OUTLOOK 

Track interest is centered at pres- 
ent on the coining Coast Artillery 
meet at Boston, on Saturday night, 
when the relay team will be pitted 
against the fast four from Tufts col- 
lege A training table was started ten 
days ago, at which Captain Whitney, 
Clark, Whitney. Baker. Nicolet, Smith 
and Manager Cooper are eating, and 
strict training has gone into effect. 
The men are confident of the results 
of the meet and feel that Tufts will 
have to make a new record if she suc- 
ceeds in winning the race. 

Many new men ha\e come out for 
the team, until now fully 10 have re- 
ported to Manager Co. .per. While 
practice is temporarily suspended 
during tbe scat let fever excitement. 
Coach Dickinson has haaH working 
especially hnrd with the men this year, 
because of the link of experience of 
most of the fellows. Two hours prac- 
tice each day. coupled with individ- 
ual instruction as far as possible, 
biings results, liowe\.r, and now 
the men can handle themselves on 
t In- boards with considerable skill. 
Tagging and starting have been es- 
pecially practiced, with encouraging 

results. 

The team suffered an almost irre- 
par able loss when 'Bone" Caldwell 
went to Cornell, but many hopeful 
things conspire to furnish the hope 
that the team will be the equal of last 
year's. Among the most cheering 
of these is the wondeiful progress 
Captain Whitney is showing this 
vear. Whit's bad knee no longer 
bothers him, and he is running bet- 
ter than he e\er has before. He is 
not only working hard himself, but is 
a continual encouragement to the en- 
tire squad. 

The probable schedule of the in- 
door meets is as follows: 

Jan. 88. — Coast Artillery meet at 
Boston. Belay with Tufts. 

p e l,. h. — B. A. A at Boston. Re- 
lay with Worcester Tech. 

Feb. 1.1. — Columbia meet at N. Y. 
Belay team and distance men. 

Feb. 22. — Armory meet at Provi- 
dence. Relav and distance men. 



periment station director which 1 
think ought to be brought to the at- 
tention of our students It is as 
follows : 

"I am cnclined to think wehaxc 
got to use our money for men who 
have had the (raining and have the 
aptitude for experimental work in 
chemistry ami allied science of an 
advanced kind. Of course, 1 know 
perfectly well that we need vei \ 
much the careful analyst, but I think 
we need still more in our agricultural 
experiment stations, men who un- 
trained to undertake investigation 
work and it is probable that we shall 
have t0 p:i.v more for such men as 
time goes on because so few are pre- 
paring to take up such work. I look 
forward to the time when more of 
the graduates of oui agricultural col- 
lege will pursue graduate study, so 
that the experimental work in chem- 
istry in its application to agriculture 
shall not be handed over to men who 
know Imt little about the application 
of science to the problems of the 
farm." 

J, b. rupee i 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communications to the Sir.s.w. concerning 
matters of general interest are welcomed. I he 
Sk;nal is not to b« held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 
To Thk Kimton Of TlIK SlUNAI.. 
Ihur Sir: 
I am enclosing a copy of a portion 
of a letter just received from an ex- 



l*o mi Bniroai <>i nm Sionai. .- 

Ihar Sirs: 

It has been suggested that the 
committee on reconstruction from the 
senate hffag before the student body 
the proposed outline of reconstruction 
drawn up by this committee, in such 
a way that it will be perfectly plain 
to the men what the present plans 
are, ami wherein suggestions might 
be made for this improvement 
Believing that this outline is much 

tOO ponderous to be properly pre- 
sented and considered at a regular 
mass meeting, w. n. submitting the 
manuscript to you, with the request 
that, if possible, it be printed in full 
in the current issue of tin- Sk.sal 
We trust that it will be death under- 
stood. It has been drawn up with 
the idea of providing something defo- 
liate to work on. Suggestions from 
members of the student Iwsly or 
alumni will be very welcome. 
Hespectfully yours, 

It l NMAMIN W. Kl.1.18, 

Boavatj A. Hmmcm, 

FrKI» D. (iUK.'.s, Kx-Ollicio. 

Outline of suggested reconstruction 
of the College Senate. As drawn up 

and sulunitted by the committee on 
reconstruction from the Senate con- 
sisting of Kllis '18, Harris 18, and 
(iriggs T.'l, ex-olllcio. 

.\f<ml»'rxln'/>. The Senate shall he 
composed of eleven members, seven 
seniors and four juniors. Fach in- 
coming junior class will elect four 
members to the Senate, each of these 
men to serve two years. Three 
incoming seniors are to be elected by 
the student body at a mass meeting 
called for that purjK»se. 

<>ffi<i>r* of the SfunU'. The officers 
of the Senate shall be a president, 
\ ice-president, treasurer, marshall, 
chairman of informal committee, 
chairman of election committee, 



# 

I 






The College Signal, Tuesday, January 21, 1913 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 21, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

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and Fittings for Steam, Water anil Ga«. Asbestos 
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Contractors for Steam and Hot Watel Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and F.ngii e 
Connections. Holyoke, Mass. 



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Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



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PRINTER, 



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Students -Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a hue 
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Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at* 
tent ion. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
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Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
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KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH blocK, Amherst 
H. M. Rogkrs, '15, Agent. 

87 Pleasant St., Studio Phone 303-a. 








A Message to Apple Growers 



raoM 



MR. THOMAS W. STECK, of Opequon, Va. 

WINNER OP THE EASTERN APPLE TROPHY 

THE 175000 PRIZE CUP DONATED BY THE COEMORTIMLR CO. 
AT THE AMERICAN LAND AND IRRIGATION EXPOSITION 



1UTR. STECK, the winner of 
the magnificent Eastern 
Apple Trophy, has written 
an account of his life work in 
apple growing that should 
prove an inspiration to every 
fruit grower. 

He tells of one block of 300 trees that 
returned $17,974.33 in nine years. 

He describes his methods of Pruning, 
Cultivation, Spraying and Fertilization. 

The whole story is given just as written 
by Mr. Steck in our new booklet en- 
titled, "Th* Winning of the Cup," a 
copy of which is yours if you will 
write for it promptly. 

A striking feature of this competition is, that it 
developed after the prize was awarded, that 
Mr. Steck raised his prize winning fruit with 
COE-MORTIMER FERTILIZERS, which he 
has used for the past two years.; purchasing 
them in the open market, from one of the Coc- 
Mortimer local agents at Winchester, Va. 

Thus the superior quality of COE-MORTIMER 
FERTILIZERS for fruits is again confirmed. 

If, when you write us, you will tell us the 
brand or make of fertilizer you are now using, 
we shall be glad to send you one of our handsome 1913 Calendars. 

Why Rot Put Your Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing Your 

Fertilizers from 

The Coe-Mortimer Company, 51 Chambers Street, New York City 




chairman of the trophy room commit- 
tee, all seniors. Also secretary, and 
vice-president of Social union, these 
to lie juniors. The vice-president of 
the Senate shall he president of the 
Social union. The secretary and 
treasurer of the Senate shall also he 
secretary and treasurer of the Social 
union. The treasurer of the Senate 
shall he treasurer of the informal 
committee. The vice-president of 
the Social union shall he chairman of 
the Social union property committee. 
The secretary shall he clerk of the 
point system. 

Ihitiis nf tin' ittfireis. President. 
Shall preside at all meetings of t lit* 
Senate, and of the student 1mr1v ; 
call special meetings of the Senate. 
lie ex -officio menilter of all comuiit- 
lle will he editor of the .M A. 
('. Student senate bulletin. 

Viii-lirrxiilint Assumes duties 
of president during absence of latter. 
As president of the Social uniou he 
shall have charge of all meetings of 
the Social union. He shall be 
chairman of the Social union com- 
mittee. He shall exercise general 
oversight over all Social union enter- 
prises. 

Tri a sun r He shall have charge 
of and he responsible for all funds of 
tin- Senate and Social union. He 
shall collect all taxes. He shall pre- 
sent a report at the end of his term to 
the student body. This report shall 
be published iu the Bulletin. As 
treasurer of the informal committee 
he shall have charge of all funds and 
pay all bills. He shall make a 
separate report of all money handled 
by him as treasurer of the committee. 
This re|>ort shall be read before the 
student hod\ ami published in the 
Bulletin. 

Mm-nlmll. He shall have charge 
of all student celebrations. Also all 
inter-class contests. He shall see 
that all rules and regulations passed 
by the Senate are enforced. He 
shall see that all measures of disci- 
pline passed by the Senate are prop- 
erly carried out. He may call upon 
any or all of the four class captains 
as assistants. 

Clmimmn of liifirmnl Committi < . 
He shall have general charge of all 
iuformals. 

( 'hni mm n of Eleetiou Commit 
He shall have charge of all elections. 

Choi rnmn of Trophy Room Commit- 
He shall have charge of the 
trophy room and all trophies. 

Si>rifinr>i <>f iIip Senate. He shall 
keep the minutes of all meetings in- 
cluding mass meetings, He shall 
handle Senate correspond.'! ncc. He 
will perform like duties as secretary 
of the Soot*] union. As clerk of the 
point system he will keep accurate 
records of all students and credit 
them with points imposed upon them 
by the regulations of the system. 

ytce-prestdettf of the Social Union. 
He shall assume the duties of presi- 
dent in the absence of the lattei . As 
chairman of the Social union property 
committee he will have charge and he 



responsible for the condition an 
maintainance of all Social unioi 
property and see that all regulation 
regarding the use of such propert 
are properly enforced. 

Committees and Their Mahe-vp 
Social union committee. This coin 
mittee shall consist of the presiden 
of the Social union who shall 1> 
chairman, the treasurer of the Sen 
union, the vice-presidont of tli. 
Social union, one faculty ineinln 
elected by the student hotly and the 
secretary to the president. Tli 
treasurer of the college shall hi' 
member cx-oilicio. 

Trophy room committee. Tlii- 
committee shall consist of a Belli*. 
inemlicr of the Senate who shall I 
chairman. MM junior member of Sci 
ate and the managers bf all varsity 
athletic teams. 

Klection committee. This commit- 
tee shall consist of one senior mem- 
ber of the Senate who shall l>e chaii- 
inan and two junior members of tli. 
Senate. This committee shall 
chosen by the Senate. 

( elehratiou committee. This «•• 
mittee shall consist of the .Marshall 
of the Senate who shall be chairman, 
one junior member of the Senate, an. I 
the captains of the four classes. 

Informal committee. This coin- 
mittiee shall consist of one senior 



K«TAHI.IOM»l. IWI3 

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, inber of the Senate who shall be 
airman, the treasurer of the Senate 
ur seniors and three juniors elected 
p the student body at a mass rneet- 
| called for that purpose, 
social union property committee. 
I Ins committee shall consist of the 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



Are In a Class 
By Themselves 



They cost but a little more than 
the cheapest, while they save twice 
U much and last five times as long 
SJ other separators. 

They save their cost every six 
months over gravity setting sys- 
tems and every year over other 
separators, while they may be 
i.ought for cash or on such liberal 
terms that they will actually pay 
for themselves. 

The new 7»P»«e I* ■ »»»' '>*"▼ IUnd 

H,.>k. in which important <Lim questions 

are ably diseased by the best autlioritn v 

i, a book that every cow owner •.limild 

Mailed fr«w U|>on request if you 

mention this paper. New 1913 l)r Laval 

, lor also mailed upon request. V* rite 

1 rarest office. 



The De Laval Separator Co. 

14.M67 Broadway. » K. Madison St.. 
New York CWeago. 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

Don't Porgct 

I hat we are carrying a good line of 
— Tobnooo 



eiRDSUl '13 



FURRER 15 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



vice-president of the Social uuion 
who shall be chairman, and four men 
from the student body who are to be 
chosen by the Senate. 

Ihtties of Committees. Social union 
committee. This committee shall act 
as an executive committee of the 
Social union. 

Trophy room committee. This 
committee will endeavor to secure all 
trophies possible, and after putting 
them in proper shape, turn them over 
to the chairman of the committee who 
will find suitable places for them in 
the cases in the room provided for 

them. 

Klection committee. This commit- 
tee will have charge of and supers is. 
all elections of the student body. 
The committee will also have charge 
of the printing of the ballots. The 
other members of the Senate will act 
as tellers at all elections. 

The celebration committee. This 
committee will direct all student cele- 
brations in accordance with the rules 
laid down by the Senate. 

Informal committee. This com- 
mittee will conduct informals. making 
and carrying out all arrangements for 

such. 

Social union property committee. 
This committee shall be subject |0 
directions from the Social union com- 
mittee. 

EkOlltm of ( )ffiin* <"«' Commit- 
tee*. The Senate shall elect the fol- 
lowing officers: President, \ice-presi- 
dent, treasurer, secretary, marshall. 
vice-president of the Social union and 
chairman of all committees. A Is--. 
two junior memlwrs of the Senate SB 
the election committee, and one 
junior member of the Senate to each 
of the celebration ami trophy room 
committees. Also, four members of 
the student lnody to membership on 
the Social union property committee. 
The student l*xly in regular mass 
ssesting called for that purpose shall 
elect : four seniors and three juniors 
to the informal committee ; one 
meinlwr of the faculty to the social 
union committee; and three incom- 
ing seniors to membership on the 
senate. 



his family, our sincere sympathy in this 
their hour of grief ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these re- 
solutions be sent to the bereaved family, 
and that a copy be published in the 
"College Signal", and that a ccpy be 
inserted in the records of the Fraternity. 

C. M. Streeter, ) 

Alfrerd S. Coe, \ For the Fraertnity. 
ite, > 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



H. H. Whit 



Whereas, It has pleased Clod in his 
infinite wisdom to take to Himself our 
friend and classmate Fdward Woodman. 
Jr ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That we the members ot the 
class of Kiis. do extend to his family, our 
sincerest sympathy in this their hour of 
grief ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these re- 
solutions be sent to the bereaved family, 
that a copy be placed in the records of 
he class, and that a copy be published in 
the "C'oi.1.1 (.K Signal " 
John C. Callard, ) 
Edwin C. I'owne, For the Class. 

George E. Donnell, > 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 






HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes 



tain St 



Northampton, Mass. 



1 re are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereat, It has pleased God in his 
infinite wisdom to take to Himself our be 
loved friend and classmate, Homer 
Howard Burt, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we the members of the 
class of 1910, do extend to his family, our 
deepest sympathy in this their hour of 
brief, aud be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these re- 
solutions be sent to the bereaved family 
and that a copy be published in the 
"College Signal," and that a copy be 
inserted in the records of the class. 
L. S. Gordon, Chairman, 
I). S. Dinsmore, 
K. B. Laird, 
S. V. Noyes, 
W. L. Harris, 



► For the Class 



or 



C R. ELDER 



Whereas, It has pleased God in his in- 
finite wisdom, to take to Himself our be- 
loved friend and brother, Warner Howard 
Burt, therefore be it 

Resolved, That we the members of the 
Beta Kappa Phi Fraternity, do extend to 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'08. — W. F. Sawyer is now em- 
ployed in an architect's office in Wor- 
cester. His address in that city is 
21 Irving Street. 

•()<.»._( iM-ai ('. Bartlett is an au- 
thor of an article in the Annuls of 

Tin EtonuA'Hjical So. -ietii of Amiiinl 
for December entitled 'The North 
American Digger Wasps of the Sub- 
family Scuhiuae. The publication 
is a portion of a thesis prepared for a 
Ph. D. degree in entomology at M. 
A. C. ami is an attempt to place be- 
fore the readers a systematic arrange- 
ment of the pic. ut knowledge ol 
these wasps. 

'0!i.— Samuel S. Grossman was mar- 
ried to Miss Pauline Haskell at Bev- 
erley, on Dec. .»<>. Mr. and Mrs. 
Grossman will return to San .Juan 
Porto Hieo where he is situated as an 
entomologist. 

'10— Two 1910 men, Francis S. 
Bee ma 11 and Charles A. Oertcl 
are now instructors in the dairy 
course of the winter Short Course. 

12. — K. H. Burr, now connected 
with the department of agriculture 
of Hutgers college, New Brunswick. 
N. .1., has recently been making a 
nursery inspection of New York state . 
'12.— John J. Fitzgerald has 
recently secured a position as assist- 
ant chemist with the General Chem- 
ical Co. of Brooklyn, N. Y. His 
address is fi4. r . Green Ave. 

'12. ,— Alfred F. Muller is now in 
Charlotte, N. C. where he is engaged 
in city planning work. His present 
address is 703 South Tryon St., 
( harlotte, N. C. 

•12.— W.C. Sanctuary is instructor 
in poultry at the New York state 
school of agriculture, Morrisville, 
N. Y. 

•12. — Fred S. Merrill is assistant 
to the Kansas state entomologist. 
His headquarters are at Manhattan, 
Kans. and he is at present engaged 
in San Jose scale investigations. 

Ex-' 12.— John T. Finnegan, 20 
Tower St., Jamaica Plain. 



Largest assortment in New En- 
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a; Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
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Toefil Mientka 

Shoes sunn am Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
Open Sunday Main St. 

On way to Post Office. 






I 

















IO 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 21, 1913 



PLAYING 

CARDS 




DEUEL'S 



DRUG STORE 



Anilieritt, .MaaM. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High- Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shirts, - • 10-15C 

Collars, - - - 2 i-ac 

Cuffs, --- - 2 I-2C 

Plain wash, - 48c per <loz. 

Same, rough dry, • - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Ralph J. sVMtMM, Agent, 7 North Cottage 
KnWAttii C. Kuwards, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN & DYER, Propa. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



The Massachusetts AsriculturalCollese 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association. 

Baseball Association. 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association. 

Tennis Association, 

Hide club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. 0. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Mockbridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. I). Griggs, 1'iesideut 

S. II. Freeborn, Manager 

I.. Edgar Smith, Manager 

E. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, Manager 

C. Bokelund, Manager 

J. VV. T. Lesure, Secretary 

Harold F. .Jones, Manager 

.1. I). French, Manager 

E. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. G. Davies, President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. MeDougall, President 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jewelry 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (iuitar Strn 

AMHKKsT, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone jo-, 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS. 

Wrlfflit <fe Ditfion 

Catalogues of 

Fasti £e Winter Goods 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Collrgt 
Students and Athletes who want the te*l, superior 
articles for the various sports should insist upon 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson Trade Mark. 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 



Skat'gShoe* 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

Wright & Ditson Goods are the standard for 
all sports 

wmioht .v- nrrnoN 

3«4 Washington St., Boston, Mast. 




THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uulckeat Mtrvlee. Brat Work, Low.il I'rl.* 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. GerrU' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' rise linen suits a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 34M 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock KVERV night 
Corner Amity and Pleasant Streets 



If yon want to be 

SOLID WITH THE GIRLS 

you must have your clothes pressed and cleaned 

ATBPSTEIN'S 

11 Amity >t. Maroon Store 

Pressing and Cleaning a specialty 

Mont liberal ticket system in town 
Tel. 303-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



CARS 



Leave AOUIE COLLEGE for H0L- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEtiE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Specks! Cars at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 

The Republican gives the best rep * s oi 
Agricultural College and Amhei rt 
news, also the best news 
of outdoor sports 

£>m$fy,t8. Sunday, p. Week M> 



THE COLLEGE 



FEB 7 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 




Vol. XX111. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 4, 19 '3- 



No. 16 



RIFLE VICTORY 

Team Tied with Columbia and Harvard 
for First. 



TUFTS WINS RELAY BOSTON ALUMNI BANQUET 

■ ■ 



Team Runs Strong Race at South Ar- 
mory Grounds. 



HOCKEY TEAM DEFEATED 



The title match of last week in the 
intercollegiate title league resulted in 
a victory for Massachusetts over 
Rhode Island state college by a WON 
..f y;»9 to 907. This shows that the 
l v.ellent standard of shooting, with 
which the team began the season, is 
being kept up. At present there is • 
triple tie for first place between 
Massachusetts, Harvard and Colum- 
bia, each team having won all of 
its matches. Cornell defeated Dart- 
mouth last week by ■ single point 
with the score of OT#. Colum- 
bia. Princeton, North Ceorgia and 
Harvard all shot scores of over U00, 
Harvard with 956 coming within 
three points of the "Aggie" MM*. 
In the western division of the 
league Iowa still continues to win and 
week shot ;»:ii; against Kansas. 
Following are the MOM ■**• i» 
last week's match : 

M.ui'liiiK I'rone. 



Oerlel, J . T. 93 

Wctherbee. K. S. 94 
Daefaer, I. w. 9* 

l.dminster, A. F. 94 
88 



100 
100 
100 

96 

100 



ratal. 

'95 
«94 
19J 

I/O 

188 

959 
The M. A. C Hitb' team coulinued 
its former good work by turning in 
the high score of 0*»4 in its match 
mst Princeton for the week end- 
ing .Ian. •'•-». While slightly lower 
• mil record of the 
this is to be ascribed 



At the South Armory meet in Bos- 
ton. the relay team lost its first race 
of the season to the Tufts runners. 
The team was composed of Captain 
Whitney 1.'., Baker »1$, ('lark I ■ 
and Kldrige 10, The last named 
man ran a strong race especially, for 
a new man. The first man was 
Baker, who lost probably about a 
yard to his man. and then Captain 
Whitney handed over to Fldridge a 
lead of l."» yards. This same amount 
was given to Clark, the last runner, 
but he was beaten out by the fastest 
man of the Tufts team. Mansfield, 
bv two or three yards. Whitney 
showed especially line four, in piling 
up the lead which he did. The team 
was handicapped by lack of practice 
during the week of the scarlet fever 
epidemic. Manager K. II. Cooper 
and Coaeh L S. Dickinson made tin- 
trip with the team. Saturday, Feb. 
H the team runs the Worcester Tech 
relav team at the It. A. A meet. 



than the 
piccediiij 

to the 1 

due to tl -C 3 

the men «— 
' lig 1 ' >,J^ 



So less and excitement 
•t fever epidemic, as 
en improving in prnc- 



The e 2 , 

the int< .•£ 9 
brighte- *" 



for the remainder of 
iate season is of the 
the last week, the 
M of the leading team* have 
1. Princeton coining up to M4 in 
the „ 1: »tch with M. A. C. and Har- 
vard setting a mark of WO. HaW- 
Is highest however, is still nine 
l.omts below this season's record of 
shot by Captain Edminster's 
men in the match with North Ceorgia. 
With steady practise there is no rea- 
son why Aggie's record should not 
improve in preparation for the last 
tches. Harvard and Columbia in 
the Fast will bear watching, while 
Iowa in the West is always danger- 
>us. From present indications how- 
\ei, there is every prospect that 
otfa the indoor and outdoor cups 
as goml as won and put away in 
-uipany with those of the past two 
1 three years. This does not mean 
at tbcie will be any lessening of 
men's efforts to set up new fig- 



SENATE RECONSTRUCTION. 

The plan of tl 
the senate was \oted upon in student 
ln:l ss meeting Wednesday. The out- 
line of proposed membership as 0*0- 
Mattd in the last BWsUl by the 
senate committee, was accepted, af- 
ter a short discussion. Beginning 
with next year "the senate shall lie 
UUlpnsr 1 ' eleven members, seven 
seniors and four juniors, each in- 
coming junior class shall elect four 
members to the senate, each of tin — 
e two years Three incoming 
seniors are to be elect.-d by the 
student body at a mass meeting 
called for that puriKise." 



OFFICERS OF PUBLIC SPEAK 
ING COUNCIL. 

The Public Speaking Council n- 
centlv elected the following olhVcis J 
President, Herbert A- lb own ; I 
president, Irving B. Lincoln | » 
tary, Leland II. Tayh.r,and treasurer. 
James Dudley French. 
Feb. 1 1 • Freshman-sophomore de- 
bate 
.Junior-senior debate. 
Final interclass debate. 
Trials for annual college 

debate. 
Final annual debate. 
Trials for Flint Oratori- 
cal contest. 
Final of Flint Orttorical 

contest. 
Final Burnham declama- 
tion contest. 



Mar. 



13. 
16. 

4. 

II. 

M. 



I Continued on pee* 2 J 




Meeting Well Attended at City Club 
Friday Night. 

Some sixty Boston alumni and 
guests of the college had their annual 
dinner and reunion at the Boston 
City club Friday night. Tbe old 
board of ollicers was re-elected : 
President. Kvan F. Richardson 'M7 : 
secretary, H. Linwood White 'O'.l ; 
treasurer, Frederick C. May «Wj 
directors, Frederick L. Taylor MO, 
Lewel Manley 1 1 and Clinton King 
'07. Prominent alumni and friends 
of the college present were I Pies. K. 
L. Buttcrucld, Secretary .1 L«'«is 
F.llswoith of the state board. Prof. 
( -,11-ry S. Hicks of the college, trus- 
, Charles II. Preston of Dativ. is. 
(..orge II. Kills of Newton and Wil- 
liam H. lk>wker '71. Klmer D. Howe 
fl, Dr. Madison Bunker '7.*». P. M. 
Haiw.MMl, general agent of the daii \ 
bureau, former Kepresentati\e S. M. 
Hobnan of Attleboro and Dr Austin 
Peters, former cattle bureau chief. 
Wilfred Wheeler, new secretary of 
the state iK.ar.l. was als.. ptWI 

There was a good representation 
of the younger men. As a feature 
of the evening the management 
brought down the college quartet, 
with C. Sheldon Holcoinb '»!.'». chora- 
gus. ami they were aceorded enthu- 
aiastic praise for their line MTI 
The .piartet OOMiwttd of Hi 
F.en.h. Qtigfi , ia an.l I legg. 

I'resi.lent Bultcilield was given I 
most enthusiastic greeting as the man 
who bad done the most of all men 10 
bring up the college to its present 
standard. "It is for the alumni," 
,aid. -"to keep m touch with the 
eullege and espe.iallv with its ideals. 
Although the college has to do with 
very practical matters, yet its ideals 
are'of high importance The things 
the college stands for have more 
pnstige than ever before. In the 
land grant colleges of the count i\ 
there are four times as many students 
studying agriculture as then- WTI 
eight years ago 'There is a growing 
retting that agriculture is coming 
into its own. 'The feeling is passing 
away that graduates of th«'H<' BOttlfM 
have come out of inferior institutions. 
There is a substantial nature to the 
agricultural training which is more 
appreciated than ever." 

The president referred to the scar- 
let fever epidemic. "Twenty-six 
,,„.„ have been attacked. Three line 
men have succumbed. It is a very 
serious time for the college to go 
through ami it is to be hoped that it 
will never have to do so again. 'They 
are splendid men, and it is doubtful 
if the college ever had a finer body 

[Continued on page SJ 



In Games Against Pilgrim A. A. 
Harvard. 



and 



I J 



TV Massachusetts Aggies MM 
defeated by Harvard's fast hockey 
team in the Boston Arena on Mon- 
day. .Ian. --'7, by a score of I to I. 
Playing a much improved game 0*0? 
heir previous exhibition against the 
Pilgrims, the Aggies made it interest- 
ing for Harvard during the entire 
tirst half. Playing an effectual pass- 
ing game, and speeding up consider 
nblv in the 100004 half, Harvard 
spelled defeat for their rapidly tiring 
ol ,,H,neuts. The reward of Harv- 
ard's constant practise and access U» 
•OOtj bi since 'Thanksgiving could 
n„t be denied. When the regulars 
| i:i ,| established a lead. Coach Win- 
sorscnt in I substitute team, and the 
,,. (ll ,i,s Irving to make g.»od, kept 
the M. A. C. team busy. 

The Aggies were the first to si-ore, 
••I icf .bines snapping the puck 
through for a goal in live minutes of 
play. The Harvard team then tried 
.ady down but pass after paas 
was broken up, as they started for 
,|„. Aggies' goal. Not until II n.iu 
had elapsed did they make the 
going even when a Hopkins-^,, twclt- 
IMiillips combination credited --Bub 

Phillips with a goal. TWO fl 

|0ak for Harvard came in the next 

f minutes of s, Iv work. Then 

after I hard scrimmage in front of 
Ibovud's goal .bmes paaaed to 
Hutchinson who neath scored a goal 
on Harvard's captain and football 
I he halt ended wilh the score 
standing Harvard .. M. A. C -' 

The second half found Ha.vard 
f M ter than ever, and working a 
machine like passing gam- Such 
passing was spectacular, for as so,,,, 
Crimson forwatd 1000104 the puck in 
MM middle of the rink, his team- 
mates turned and sprinted for tin- 
Aggie goal as race-horeee eeeking a 
fair start. At such times these for- 
b often outdistanced their op- 
r limit- bv-pnek starting and oiil.v 
three defense men stood between 
them and tin- goal they wished to 
score on. However the game was 
„ot all Harvard's way M this half. 
"Jack" Hutchinson would occasion- 
ally surprise some ambitious Crimson 
forward bv purloining the puck, and 
*tMfl once started for Harvard's 
goal, not one forward could catch 
him. Sifting through Harvard's 
defense single-banded was diilicult. 
hut twiee the 'Aggie" captain faced 
Harvard's captain at goal, and only 
by marvelous "stops" did Canine, 
prevent two tallies in this manner. 
This goal-tender has proved his abil- 

| Continued on page 6| 



The College Signal. Tuesday, February 4, 1913. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, Februaiy \. .9.3- 






RIFLE SHOOTING 

[Continued from page i] 



BTM for Dm league record. On the 
rotitrurv, those on the second team 
as well as those on the first, are faith- 
fully carrying OUl Captain Kdtnins- 
tii's Qrdtfl that each man shall 
shoot at least two strings a day. 

The work of the new men deserves 
especial mention. Headle, Dunbar 
ami Osftsl can always bs depended 
upon for good scores, while Wether- 
hee needs a little more developing. 
Headle, who has restricted himself to 
a steady 1*X in each match, has shot 
197 in practice: after the experience 
of a few more matches it is possible 
tint he may hang up a new intenol- 
lejliate record. 

Griggs and Clark, members of 
last \eai •'«. team who were near the 
foot of the tirst list, by shooting 
above 190 in the last two matches, 
showed that all they needed was 

pl.-iitiee. 

A coach for the rifle team is 
expected to show up within a short 
time. Captain Kdminster has proved 
an excellent coach, — as good as 
could lie de-ired. hut he can not 
he with the men all the time. Cap- 
tain Martin, who is now in Washing- 
ton, has the promise of Captain Fay. 
in charge of the small arms firing, 
that In- will send up a coach as soon 

ai possible. 

If carefully prepared nmuuition 
can help the men. nothing is left to 
be desired . The manufacturers of 
the II. M. C. eaitridge iccently noti- 
fied the military department that 
•_>i 1.01*0 rounds of -pc-mlly loaded 
cartridges had bsSfl shipped to the 
college to he exchanged for the same 
amount of the regular V. M. ( 
ammunition. These cartridges are 
loaded in accordance with the for- 
mula of Dr. Hudson and Mr. Iluha- 
lek, two of the most noted shots in 
the world. 

Tin- unotlicial scores for the Prince- 
ton meet follows : 





I mi; 


PrWML 


total. 


A. V. Kdminster, 


«tf 


98 


KM 


F. 1>. (iriggs 


94 


98 


192 


K. S. Clark. 


9* 


99 


■<>' 


(,. r . Hyde, 


8a 


97 


I89 


M. Headle, 


SJ 


97 


l88 


Five highest scores, 




954 


K. \V. Dunbar, 


9» 


97 


188 


J. T Oertel, 


9° 


98 


188 


W. C. Forbush. 


9» 


93 


187 


P. F. Whitmore, 


85 


99 


184 


R. S. Weatherbee 


86 


94 


189 



Total, 



1 XX 1 



FAI.I. MAKK9MEN. 

As a result of the outdoor shoot- 
ing done at the range during the fall. 
13 men have qualified for the badge 
of marksman. More will probably 
develop in the spring, when the 
grand rush of the seniors to clean up 
their work begins. Clark's score of 
|.i."> out of a possible l. r »0 is the best. 
The men and their totals follow : 
Forbush, 128 

Hyde, 130 



Whitmore, 

Build, 

Howe, 

Samson. 

.Jacobs, 

.Jones, 

Kenney, 

(iriggs, 

Clark, 

Kdminster, 

MacDougall, 



118 
109 
101 
110 
107 
102 
99 
107 
189 
128 
199 



BOSTON ALUMNI BANQUET 

(Continued from first pagaj 



of men than it has today. There is 
a constant upward tendency which is 
noticeable. 

••The new dairy building is one of 
the most significant buildings in the 
college group. It is as well built and 
arranged a building as most colleges 
have for any purpose. That means 
much, for it shows that in equipment 
this line of progress is getting more 
marly what it deserves. For the first 
time, this year, the college has intro- 
duced the major system by which 
every junior takes some vocational 
subject, which is better than the for- 
mer scattered system of courses. It 
is well liked by th.> students. Par- 
ticular advice will be given and so 
the young men have a better chance 
of choosing a vocation. The new 
professor, Dr. Marshall, will have 
charge of microbiology ami of the 
graduate school and great things are 
expected of him." 

President Butterfield referred to 
the resignation of Marquis F. 
Dickinson from the l>oiird of trustees 
and detailed at length the fine per- 
sonal traits and the large services he 
his rendered to the college. The 
president was very warm ami tender 
in his reference to Mr. Dickinson. 
'The college is asking for $210,(KM) 
for new buildings ami it is unfortu- 
nate that the commission on economy 
and efficiency is opposed SO increased 
appropriations. The college faces a 
critical patted* It has expanded 
much lately. It has taken on many 
new things. Probably not as much 
will be needed in the near future. 
Present foundations must be built on. 
'Quality* must be the watchword. 
Conservation must be the policy. 
The problems of teaching and student 
life must be worked out, so that the 
college will serve the state better 
than ever and become a public ser- 
\ ice institution. Problems must be 
studied intensely and the purpose 
must be to build rather than to 
expand. Money will be needed for 
thiB as in the past. The college 
is doubtless in the list of the lead- 
ing half-dozen agricultural col- 
leges of the country. The state 
ought to know that the college will 
need more money if it is to keep its 
place." He told of a similar college 
which pays small salaries to the pro- 
fessors and loses about a third of its 
faculty every year. 

"Our system is more expensive, 
but it is far better. Yet some of our 



CLOSING OUT SALE ! 

Skates and Skating Shoes 



$4 50 Skates, 
$3.00 Skates, 
$2.00 Skates. 
$3.50 Shoes, 
$3.00 Shoes, 



Now $3.50 
Now $2.25 
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Now $2.85 
Now $2.20 



Page's Shoe Store 



BETWFEN THK BANKS 



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JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



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Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Fromplly and 
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Dinner if arranged for. 



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Wriixiiiiiilue i-*c»t*»an 



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E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROUM8 

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Ornci Hours: 

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Fail i winter Soils k Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
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Latest Styles 
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BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANDY TONIC 



best men are not paid nearly as much 
as no better men in western colleges. 
Thev have been strongly tempted this 
year by higher salaries from the 
West, but the college has kept them. 
If the college is to hold its be*t men 
always, it must be able to pay its 
professors suitably. It is important 
for the state to realize these truths. 
It is no joke or a campaign cry that 
the college faces a crisis. One phase 
of growth It closing and a new chap- 
ter is opening. The mass of the 
j.iople must feel that the money put 
into the college is an investment 
yielding large returns and not an ex- 
penditure. All alumni can influence 
public opinion." 

President Richardson led in the old 
college cheer and the young men fol- 
lowed in the new cheer for "pivw " 
Kx-director Wheeler of the BJjodl 
Island expei iment station offend a 
resolution of regret at trustee Dickin- 
son's resignation, of sympathy with 
him and of appreciation of his 
vices, whieh was adopted, <»nl. 
transmitted and entered on the 
records. Trustee Klmer 1). Howe 
and others of the leaders added theii 
contribution to the oratorical enter- 
tainment. The new *ong-l>ooks w.r. 
distributed to Boston alumni for the 
first time. 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACR1NAWS 




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Kendall '16 



Our prayers have been answered 
in our absence. The "hash-hoi, 
now abound* in hooks. 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Miss. 

tl. H WHITE '10. Apnt 
10 Allen Street 




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and you make them 
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Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters In all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, February 4. »9'3 



The College Signal, Tueeday, February 4. '9'3 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening; by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

R. II.VANZWALKNI1URG 'n.Kd.tor in Chief 
CIIHSTERK.VVIII'l-.I.KR'u.ManamnKEditor 
OSCAKO. ANDERSON 'H. Assistant Kdit.u 
FREDERICK D.GB1GGS*13. Athletic Editor 
B. MILl.EK JORHAN '13. Athletic Editor 

HARRY W. At I KN'iJ, 
ERVINE F. PARKER '14. 
HAROLD C BI.A< K '14. 
J ALBEKT PRICE 15 



Alumni Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Department Editor 

Associate Editor 



GEOKOE E DONNEI.I. '1?. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
GEORGE ZABRISK1E. 2d. 'ij. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI.AKK.IR.'u.Asst.Kus Manager 
ERNEST F. I PTON '14. Asst. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J.Cl.Ol '(ill '15. Circulation 

Subscription $150 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd. 



photo-dram asd ■posd ■■ evening 

making the acquaintance of voiir 
algebra. With few exceptions the 
offending students are members of 
the two lower classes and it is proba- 
ble that the freshmen do not take the 
initiative. This puts it up to the 
sophomores, and they also have col- 
lege customs to observe. A system 
which would put this matter in the 
hands of the senate would seem to be 
practicable; any offender who injures 
the name of the college is more 
.1. serving of an ollicial ducking than 
he who keeps out of sight when the 
track manager appears with a snow- 
shovel. 



Entered as Mcond-e'aas matter at the Amherst 
Po* Omem. 

Vol. XXI II. Tuesday, Feu. 4. No. 16 



The unfortunate incident at the 
local "movie" establishment Friday 
night routes as the climax to a long 
series of exhibitions of "horse-play" 
on the part of men presumably of a 
college age. It is not in an attempt 
to excuse the BSOSMOObla that this is 
pnsented. The management of the 
hall has been long-suffering, to say 
the least, and some action from that 
quarter was certainly justified. 
However, the charge that the disturb- 
ance conies only from the men of 
this college, is unwarranted. The 
large numlier of town boys in the 
audiences is evidently not considered 
as a factor, for it is the truth that the 
boys of the town are responsible for 
much of the disturbance blamed to 
the college men. This is not in 
encouragement of those students who 
cieate a disturbance, but the disturb- 
ing element is really in far smaller 
propoi tion than is generally believed 
by disgusted townspeople. 

Many of the students have the idea 
that the shows offered in the town 
hall exist only because «,f their sup- 
port, and that therefore the manage- 
ment owes them a little MOM than the 
regular program offers. It may 
interest those men to know that the 
shows were kept running throughout 
the summer vacation. The manage- 
ment might show More discretion in 
the choice of the vocal selections ren- 
dered. Some of them would make 
even a dignified congress of college 
presidents take on the riotous aspect 
of a Cnmornr trial. 

In all seriousness, however, what 
excuse has any man to offer for 
behaving in such a way as to cause 
discomfort to those about him and to 
hurt the name of the college? The 
consequences may be graver than 
many will grant ; this is not a 
privately endowed college but one 
which must convince the state that it 
is worthy of its support throughout. 
If you do not feel that you have 
completely outgrown the high school 
age deny yourself the "uplift" of the 



boards to practice on and not the 
trodden snow which usually results 
when the fellows walk around the 
track. 

The junior prom has also been hit 
by the epidemic. It has been post- 
poned until April 1«, although that 
date is not definitely settled upon as 
yet. 

Yesterday morning I scarlet fever 
-uspect was discovered in the person 
of Walker '16. Prompt work on the 
part of Mr. Hicks brought about the 
quarantine of Brooks farm wheie 
about ten men are "bottled up." 



Have Your Shoes Repaired With 



OUR SPECIAL 



Wear-proof Sole Lea tier 



Costs you no more than the ordinary 
kind — will wear nearly twice as long. 



Prompt Service Strictly 
First-class Work. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The Amherst Gas company will 
probably declare a dividend after 
this week. 

There is a wailing and gnashing of 
teeth among the faithful ; but think 
of the saving in car-fares. 

No Wednesday assembly was held 
two weeks ago owing to the small 
number of men in college. 

Of course we all like a little sym- 
pathy now and then, but it has uot 
vet been proven equal to sixty. 

The ice-making plant is now in 
operation in the Dairy building. 
Hockey management take notice. 

The condition of the evergreens 
around the hockey shelter suggests 
some additional work for the land- 
scape men. 

To quote a "Hatup" paper: Na- 
poleon's retreat from Moscow had 
nothing on the evacuation of Am- 
herst by the Aggies. 

Sunday morning another case of 
the fever was reported. George V 
Danfoith of Foxcroft, Me., is at 
present sick with a very light case 
and is at the Pratt hospital. 

A select few took in the Mette- 
wampe Trek last Saturday. The 
trail led across countiv toward 
Shutesbury, then south over Mt Ori- 
ent, past the Springs to the car line. 

It is reported that a study of the 
Cryptogams is to be added to the 
Botany work already required of the 
luckless sophomores. The upper- 
classmen, with revived remembrance 
of the course as it has been, extend 
their sympathies. 

The third victim of the recent 
scarlet fever epidemic at the college 
was Rutherford S. Treat of Seymour, 
Conn., who died at his home on Jan. 
•22nd. lie left Amherst when the 
general exodus began on the 16th 
and was stricken with the disease 
after his arrival home. Treat was a 
member of the freshman class and 
was 21 years of age. 

With the prospects of snow last 
week, the track association posted a 
notice relative to the fellows keeping 
off the board track when there is 
snow on it. This is well worth con- 
sideration on the part of the students 
because the track team needs clear 



NORTH RIPTOH ?. 



Academy 
Music. 



WKEK OF FEBRUARY 3 



Tne Hoiinampion Players 



IX 



The Learned Ladies 

EVERY EVENING AT 8:00 

Price* 25c. SOc and 7Sc 



Wed. and Sat. Mats, at 2:15 

Prices 38c and 50c 



E. M. BOLLES 

THE kHOEMAN 



Coolep's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Slu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



Write Ideas forM oving Picture Plays ! | 



T/TiTT CAN WHITE PHOTO PLAYS AND 
lUU EARN $25.00 OR MORE WEEKLY 

We Will Show You How ! 

If you have ideas— if you can think— we will show you the secrets 
of this fascinating new profession. Positively no experit nte or literary 
excellence necessary. No •• flowery language " is wanted. 

The demand for photo plays is practically unlimited. The big film 
manufacturers are " moving heaven and earth " in their attempts to get 
enough good plots to supply the ever increasing demand. They are 
offeiing $100 and more, for single scenarios, or written ideas. 

We have received many letters fiom the film manufacturers, such as 
VITAC.RAPH, KDISON, KSSANAY, LUBIN, SOLAX. IMP, RKX, 
RELIANCE, CHAMPION, COMET, MELIES, ETC., urging us to 
send photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets of success. 

We are selling photo plays written by people who "never 
before wrote a line for publication." 

Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
good idea every week, and will write it out as directed by us, and it 
sells for only $25. a low figure, 

You Will Earn $100 Monthly For Spare Time WorK. 



PBEE 



SEND YOUR NAME ANO ADDRESS AT ONCE FOR FREE COPY OF 
OUR ILLUSTRATED BOOK, " MOVING PICTURE PLAYWRITIN6 " 



Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what this 
new profession may mean for you and your future. 



NATIONAL AUTHORS' 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

PltKSlOENT Bt'lTKItHKLO « >N T11K 
KviKNMoN Hll.l-. 

Pres. K. L. Hutt.rfield is *SSftod 
at some length in one of the principal 
agricultural weeklies in regard |0 the 
Lever hill providing for fedei h1 < xten- 
tioa depart incuts in connection with 
agricultural eollegos. 

"The main features <>f the Lever 
• a tension hill are incorporated in the 
Pag.- hill. This is ■ mistake. The 
two do not belong together. The 
extension NM is intended to complete 
the system of Federal aid to colleges 
of agriculture which now provide for 
instruetiou to students and research 
investigation, and which ought to 
provide also for that third great task 
,,f the colleges, the extension of agri- 
cultural teaching to all the people. 

•On the other hand, the Plfll bUl 
l<ro]>oseB a system of institutions of 
high school grade partly far the pur- 
po«e of teaching agriculture. 1 
I,, lieve that this work also should he 
MppOtted in part by the national 
I ■ratal This is n greatly 
needed part of our system of agricul- 
tural education. Hut the two hills 
have different aims and cover entirely 
different ground. The funds appro- 
priated by them must be administered 
,iatelv. and it is neither states- 
ulike nor wise to bring these two 

things into one bill 

•This is no time for misunder- 
nding or controversy. It is a 
time for action. I know of SO more 
important act sf legislation for 
..Lancing the welfare of our agricul- 
,1 people, nor one that promises 
more directly to reduce the cost of 
living, than the immediate passage of 
the Lever bill." 

Since this appeared the LffSf hill, 
which passed the house of BOOM 
tatives, baa been replaced in the 
,ate by the Page bill. 

SIGNAL COMPETITION 
The results of the BtOfl vi editorial 
lKmrd competition to date are sub- 
mitted. Eor some competitors finals 
will soon give place to a •■makeup" 
in the competition. 

l'.»l 1. 
(lay, M.I 

Smith, L E. lt.l 

Russell, 8.8 

lit 15. 
BuclL *>•'* 

McLain, W 

Pendleton, 15° 

Draper, 14.:;_' 

Callard, IfcM 

1010. 

(urtin, ■-'•-'•'>* 

Rogers, 17.02 

Ilarrocks. 14.oT> 

Chamberlain, 0»S8 

Hulsizer, 3.2'2 

DEAN'S SATURDAYS 

The following dates are hereby 
• lineal Sf Dean's Saturdays, for 
remainder of the college year : 
March S, April 12, May 17. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LANDSCAPE. 

The dwuricm Ci'!/, the leading 
national magazine of civic affairs. 
has opened a new department to be 
. I. -voted to village and country prob- 
lems. The opening article is OS 
•The Opportunity of the Country 
Village" and is written by Prof. f. 
A. Waugh. 

USUAL BOtSASSSY. 

Prof. K. L QSolft is the author of 
a concise, well illustrated little »x>ok 
on "Hog-raising in New England." 

I . ..\<>MI< I, 

Dr. R. .1 Sprague lectured TftSTO 
dav evening before the Woman's 
club of South Dudley Falls, on the 
••Historical Background of the Bal- 
kan War." 

bososoon 

E. M. McDonald lectured before 
the Billerica grange Thursday, on 
'•The Selection of Seed Corn." Ol 

.Ian. If., Mr. MeD lid addressed 

the Middlesex North Agricultural 
aesociation. His subject in the 
afternoon was •v.-il Fertility ,' and 
in the evening, -'Corn-growing for 

r.oht." 

KXTKKSK'N 

The extension seivice conducted I 
very successful five day school in 
Brimfietd two weeks ago under the 
direction of Pr..f>. Waid.Stoi \ . lb 
Craham and Miss Bunce. The 
school was held under the auspices 
of the local grange and ovei 25(1 
people attended. OOSM ol them fr-.m 
out of town. This is the first exten- 
sion school in Hampd. n county. 

Professor Waide lectured .Inn. "-'1 
before the Pittsfiehl V.M C. A. OS 
,il Fertility." 
The apple packing school opened 
.Ian It with an enrollment of 
about ."»<» students. Over 40 applica- 
tions for admission had l>een received 
before the scarlet fever epidemic, 
but this cut the number of actual 
attendants down to ten below tin- 
total capacity of the lOSOOl. The 
instruction is given by R. W, 
Rees, extension instructor in Pomol- 
ogy, who h:.s had large experience in 
box packing in Oregon. The school 
continued for one week. 

The January copy of PsSS f»r 
fllSUff »• now out; the article. 
•How to make fence posts last 
longer" is by Prof. W. D. Clark of 
the Forestry department. 

I I oKM ri.TIKK.. 

Fourteen have registered for the 
short course in floriculture this year. 
The lectures on this subject are being 
given by Professor White and A. 
B. Butler of Field's store Northamp- 
ton. Saturday trips to the various 
< ommerciul establishments in the 
Connecticut valley and the vicinity 
of Boston are being taken weekly 
and any students .leaning to take 
these trips are welcome to do so. 

On Monday afternoons at 1-20 
special lectures are given to regular 



DIAIVIIIVO ACIDS 

///,- following an- ionic tonclusions t cached by 
the Iowa Station in a bulletin recently issue,/ 
/or the benefit of the farmers of that state: 

i The principal portion of the acid-soluble organic nitrogen contained in 
the soils herein investigated is made up of acid amides, monamino acids and 
diamino acids. 

2 The larger part of the phosphotungstic acid precipitate obtained by the 
Hausmann-Osborne method in the manner described in this puhlcat.on and 
recorded in Tabic I as nitrogei <>f di.imino ... ids, actually represents dtamtoO 
nitrogen, the MO !*•» P > I b«l©*|taj t<> CUMOI '>ther than (HaSBiM .« '-Is. 

, In Um case of the tiltraU? from the phosphottmuM't m "I pncipjUl* 

Dreaeated in Table 1 as atttofea of monamino aclda.il was fmm.i thai from 

68 02 to 8s -iS percent of that filtrate in lad rapn-atnted monamino nitrogen, 
the remainder, from 31 «>X to 14.0a per rent, consist lag of m oogenous com- 
pounds other than monamino acids. The »l)OVC < -oncluMons r. fer in that por- 
tion .»( tl- OTfaok niti.gen which could be extracted by bolSOg with hjclio 
chloric acid. 

.V.'.v ;.-//,// Jo YOl know about that! 

" Study the l % lant I-'oo.l Z'foblem" 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 

43 Chatham St., Boston 




. A. SHEPARD, 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimcrs 

Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIUTt 







That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C A K. 

CAMPION, «ole A K ent 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 

We make them all and make them right at 




3VLFI03ST 

College Stores. 









il 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, February 4. «9'3 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 4, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought lion and BrtM Pipe, Valves 
and Pill iiiRs (or Steam. Water an<l Ga«, Vsbestos 
and MaK n *" sl; * Boiler and Hipa Covering*, Pipe 
Cut to sketch. Mill Supt<het Enftireeti im 

Contractors for Stean> .hkI Hoi \\ atei Heating, 
Automat c Sprinkler Systems, Hoilei and Kngi' e 
(Miinections. Holyoke, Mass. 



theTeachers Exchange 



Of Boston 



\ton St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 




C&r-pfrvtcr & .Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst. Mas*. 



n 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about (iroups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasK BlocK, Amherst 

H. If. RoiigRs, 15, Agent. 

87 Pleasant St., Studio Phone 303-2. 

==> 



AMessagetoAppleGrowers 



FROM 



MR. THOMAS W. STEM, of Opequon, Va. 

WINNER OF THE EASTERN APPLE TROPHY 

THE 175000 PRIZE CUP DONATED BY THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 
AT THE AMERICAN LAND AND IRRIGATION EXPOSITION 



TW[R. STECK. the winner of 
A "■" the magnificent Eastern 
Apple Trophy, has written 
an account of his life work in 
apple growing that should 
prove an inspiration to every 
fruit grower. 

He tells of one block of 300 trees that 
returned $17,974.33 in nine years. 

He describes his methods of Pruning, 
Cultivation, Spraying and Fertilization. 

The whole story is given just as written 
by Mr. Steck in our new booklet en- 
titled, "The Winning of the Cup," a 
copy of which is yours if you will 
write for it promptly. 

A striking feature of this competition is, that it 
developed after the prize was awarded, that 
Mr. Steck raised his pme winning fruit with 
COE-MORTIMER FERTILIZERS, which he 
has used for the past two years ; purchasing 
them in the open market, from one of the Coe- 
Mortimer local agents at Winchester, Va. 

Thus the superior quality of COE-MORTIMER 
FERTILIZERS for fruits is again confirmed. 

If, when you write us, you will tell us the 
brand or make of fertilizer you are now using, 
we shall be glad to send you one of our handsome 1913 Calendars. 

Why Hot Put Your Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing Your 

Fertilizers from 

The Coe-Mortimer Company, 51 Chambers Street, New York City 




students and to the short course stu 
dents in floriculture, by sonic prac- 
tical iiutn on some topic connected 
with glass house work. An illus- 
trated lecture was given on .Ian. ■_'<» 
by W. U. Cobb representing Lord A. 
Burnhnm company. On dan. 27 F. 
.1. Elder of the same company spoke 
on heating. Feb. .!, Kben Holmes 
of Montrose spoke on rose growing 
under glass and on Feb. 10, W. 
II. Klliott of Mndlmiy, N H. and 
Brighton will speak on the same sub- 
ject. Feb. 11, C. H. Totty and Wil- 
liam Duckham of Madison, N. .1. will 
speak on chrysanthemum culture and 
conservatory plants Feb. 17, ('. 
F. Boyle of (Jalvin's Hack Bav store. 
Boston will talk on the retail trade. 
On Fib. M, M. A Patten of Tewks- 
bury will speak on carnation culture. 
On March 13, Mr. Hun-ell of the firm 
of Lager A. Ilurrqll. Summit. N. .1 
will speak on orchids 

HOCKEY TEAM DEFEATED 

[Continued from page 1 1 

itv bv establishing a collegiate n< - 
ord of "stops" for the year, in the 
Princeton game. 

Sortwell. the forward who made 
three of the four goals for Harvard 
in the Vale game recently, found 
■■|)et" .Jones a watchful opponent 
and not until late in the second half 
diil the former cage a goal. Within 
(he last minute of play .loiics broke 
away and scorer! the hint goal— hi* 
second tally for the evening. 

Among the substitutes for Harvard 
was Percy Wendell, the Harvard 
football captain. This chunky ath- 
lete played a fair game for a player 
who has lieen on skates but little in 
throe years. 

Particularly in the first half Har- 
vard found the Maroon defense hard 
to get by. Moth Needbam and 
Archibald did splendid work ami 
Br ewer was credited by Boston 
papers with playing "a very fine 
game." 

The weakness of the Aggie team 
apparently lies in an unbalanced for- 
ward line. ••Individually some of 
the men held Harvard even during 
the game" — to quote Boston writers | 
but in passing the forwards were ex- 
tremely weak. In this respect the 
team is not up to the standard of the 
past two years. A few more work- 
outs on good ice will doubtless bring 
a decided improvement in team 
work. 






Total stops- Gardner S, Brewer 21 
Referees — Dr G. W Tingley and Jack 
Noifolk. Umpires Hill Carlton and 
Pellett. Timet*- B. Woods, Kelly and 
Dr K. F. Murphy. Time-Two 20m. 

The M A. ('. hockey team struck 
a snag in the Pilgrim A. A. at the 
Boston Arena Jan. 21 and was 
defeated 12 "2. The Pilgrims li:i\ . 
been reorganized lately and now con- 
sist largely of the champion Inter- 
colonials of lust ■enaou. The slush 
and water combination at the college 
rink has afforded the men but little 
opportunity to develop either indi- 
vidual or team play and they weie 
powei less against their speed ■ oppon 
cuts. 

••Spider" Fynan wa- easily the D 
performer of the evening, seoring .'. 
polatU. His team-mate .lack Frit/ 
did some fast skating and caged 
goals. 

For M. A. C. (apt. Hutchinson 
and "Det" Jones played their usual 
Upandjr, consistent game. In Brav 
however, the Pilgrim goal, they found 
one of the cleverest and most vigi- 
lant goal tenders in greater Boston 
and he allowed (he puck to slip into 
the net but twice. The summary . 



VI A. I 

Chisholm, Iw 
Kernald, Little, rw 
Hutchinson, c 
Jones, r 



PILGRIM A. A 

rw, MrKtnni'i 

lw, Ford, Whittcn 

c, Fynan 

r. r*rtti 



Need ham, cp 
A 1 c In bald, p 
Brewer, g 



cp, \V bitten, Davenport 

p, Small 

g, Brav 



Score— Pilgrim A. A. 12, M. A < 
Goals— Fynan 5, Frits 3. McKinnon .-. 
Mn.ill, Hutchinson, I hisholm, Davcn 
port. Referee — Tingley. Assistant 

res— Osgood. Goal umpires— Dr. I 
D. Shrpard, Hull. Timers — Kellev. 
I lowly. Time— 20-minute halves. 



M. A < 

rw. Chisholm 

c, Hutchinson 

r, Jones 



HARVARD. 

Hopkins. Hanson, Iw 
Phillips. Palmer, c 
Sortwell, Gorham, r 
Clark, Morgan, Smart, rw 

lw, Kernald, Johnson 
Goodale. cp cp, Needbam 

Willetts. Wendell, p p, Archibald 

( .ardner, Carnochan, g g, brewer 

Score— Harvard 9, Aggies 3. Goals- 
First half : Jones, 4m 55s; Hutchinson, 
18m. 39s; Second half: Jones. 19m. 30s. 
Penalties Kiist half Ilnti hinsoti. tripp- 
ing, 2m ; Second half: Needbam, tripp- 
ing, :in.; Goodale, tripping, 2m. Stops 
-First half: Gardner 3, Brewer 12: 
Second half: Gardner 5, Brewer 9. 




Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company. 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



Are In a Class 
By Themselves 



They cost but a little more than 
the cheapest, while they save twice 
a» much and last five times as long 
.is other separators. 

They save their cost every six 
months over gravity setting sys- 
tems and every year over other 
separators, while they may be 
bought for cash or on such liberal 
terms that they will actually pay 
lot themselves. 

The new 71-page Me I .-evil DeJri itead 
Book, in which Important dairy question* 
an ably di»cus*ed by the i*-st autnortttts, 
is a book that every c»w owner should 

M tiled tree upon rcqoett 'J 
mention this pap»r. New *tj De M J»l 
, log also mailed u|«>n request. >> rite 
to nearest ofhee. 



The De Laval Separator Co. 



MS 167 ltn>a<lwar. 
s. w York. 



tt K. Ma.ll-.'ii -1.. 
1 hit ago. 



B. A. A. MEET SATURDAY 

The relay team will next Saturday 
run its annual race with the fast team 
from Worcester Tech. The Worces- 
ter team is headed by Captain Keith, 
the starrpiarter-miler. and is made up 
of veterans. While the four men to 
run Saturday for M. A. C. are not 
yet picked. Captain Whitney and 
t lark are the only men on the squad 
who have had much experience in 
the relay. Nicolet is as fast as ever 
and in freshman Eldridge the track 
team has happened upon I runner 
who gets remarkable results in spite 
of his hiek of experience. With a 
little more experience the team is 
capable of fast work and is a well- 
balanced .piartet of runners. 

SOPHOMORE-FRESHMAN 

BAbKKTBALL 

Last Wednesday evening, the 
Sophomore basketball team met 
defeat at the hands of the freshmen 
by a score of 1M-1I. Odds seemed 
to favor the sophomores before the 
game even though Pike, 'die captain, 
was forced to be out of the game 

btonnan el sickness At times the 

BUM was very fast but the freshmen 
had the upper hand all the time. 
Hall, the freshman captain showed 
that he was a past master at basket- 
ball, and Smith excelled for the 
sophomores. Many fouls were 
called, making the game one of the 
cleanest seen on the floor for some- 



S. Francis Howard ¥4, as part of 
the work of his degree for Ph. !>., 
has been received at the college 
library. 

"'.17. — lohn M. Harry has recently 
presented to the College through Dr. 
G. F. Stone, a valuable collection of 
books, which deal with historical, 
botanical, and horticultural subjects. 
The collection includes many vol- 
umes from the library of his father, 
the late David Harry, who was for 
over 2(1 years a member of tin- Bos- 
toll city council, befasf president of 
that bodj for several years. 

''.I'.l.- (apt. William 11. Armstrong 
of Potto Man visited the college 
recently. 

'i>7.- Frederick A. Cutter is now 
engaged in business in Orange, N 
.1. Mr. (utter was in Amherst re- 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Dally and Suuday Papers 
with a full line ol College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Wade Pies 

i»eing baked for us by Miss Canavan 
I Live you tried them? 

i>«»ts*t i*«»t*M:«-»t 

That we are carrying a good line of 
To!»*too«» 



time. The lineup 

I KlSMgEN. 

Moses, b 
Keed, rl> 
Hall, c 
Layman, rl 
Keegan, If 



BIROSUl '13 



FaRRER IS 



Sol-HoMoKrS. 

rf, Snnlh. Masse 

it, Pram. 

c, Dole 

lb. Little, (.iigg> 
rb, Mehcan 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

specialty of College Classes 



1 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O O A L 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'H'J. — Herbert Myrick is author of 
a new Orange Judd liook. -Co-opera 
tivc Finance," published in the in- 
terests of co-operative banking. The 
liook contains the result of the au- 
thor's study of Furopean ami Amer- 
ican banking and credit systems and 
comprehensively covers the .■subject. 
Mr. Myrick has accepted invitations 
to address joint sessions of I »oth the 
New Hampshire and Maine Legisla- 
tures on conservation and co-opera- 
tive finance. 

•m:L— At the annual meeting of the 
New Jersey State Board of Agricul- 
ture. Dr. II. .1. Wheeler, manager of 
the agricultural service bureau of 
the American Agricultural Chemical 
Company, read a paper on "Some 
interrelations of plants, soils and 
fertilizers.- The past week. Dr. 
Wheeler read two papers before the 
national lime manufacturers' MWO- 
ciation in New York and ITM ntw 
,,„ the evening of the HH the 
speaker and guest at ■ dinner of 
the "One Hundred Farmers" of the 
diversity Club of New York City. 
'94. _A copy of the thesis sub- 
mitted to the "Board of University 
Student* of Johns Hopkins by Prof. 



celitlv. 

'<i7.- Clifford B. Thompson visited 
eolle'j. H rnml days ago. 

'O'.i. Myron W. Thompson, who is 
in the naliona forestrv -service in 
Colorado, recently made a shoi I vi-it 
at Amher-t 

■Q9. John Noves visited the col- 
lege on business last week. Con- 
nected with Warren II. Manning. 
Noves is entered M landscape woik 
at Akron. ' > 

flJl '01. Lorte L Harris 1- peatOf 
Of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
:it Little Falls. Minn. 

Kx-'m;. .losiab F. Green aM 
accepted a position with the Graham 
farm lauds company of Graham. 
fuHnO county. Cat, who are :,bout 
to put on the market 7_',<KM» acres 
of irrigated alfalfa land located in 
Fresno county. Green will be in 
charge of the a^'.iicv force in tin 

., oilier :illd lit the home 
ollice 111 Graham. lie has had a 
wide and varied experience in the 
past in land matiei- in < alifornin, 
Canada and the e;»>t. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPF:TS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPEN.sFS Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



A Nl> 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 

COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
it 



CAP A GOWNS 



To the Ameucan Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty 



RESOLUTIONS 

PfftemSaV It has pleased God in 
Hi- infinite wisdom, to take to Him- 
self our beloved friend ami classmate, 

Rutherford Sperrj Treat. Ikerofnre 

be it 

BawJeOaf, That we the members of 
the class of P.HC. do extend to his 
familv. our deepest -sympathy in fhis 
their hour of grief, and be it furtl.ei 

Aeenieat, that i copy <,f thene 

resolutions be sent to the bereaved 
familv. that a copy be published iu 
the '*'Coi.i.k;k Siovai.," ami that a 
1 opv be inserted in the records of 
the class. 

Clayton W. Nash, ) 

K. L. Weiitwoith, v For the Class. 

Glenn 11. Carrots. ) 



WOODWARD'S 
tUNCH 



a; Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



The hockey team will play K- P- I- 
on the campus Friday afternoon. 

k«ihii>b>i. imm 

Stkimikn Lank Foi*0»« 

MAN|-KA<-I I'MINO .» KVV K I.K.K 

im> nnwui mrr it >iow roam 

OtAJB AM) OOfaUDOB 

PENS AM) KlMiH ^ 

OOLD, WI1.VBR AND BHONIM MKUAI^I 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from I A. M. to 4 A.M. 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes siiiiieii am Polished 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
Opm Snndavjr Main Ml. 

On way to Post Office. 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 4, 1913. 



PLAYING 

CARDS 




The Massachusetts AgriculturalCollege 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



DEUEL'S 



DRUG STORE 



Ainiicrst, Mii»a. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

/Itg/t-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 

Shirt*, • • 10 15c 

Collars, - • 2 i-ac 

Cuffs, - • - - Ji:c 

Plain wash, • 48c per tluz. 

Same, rough dry, - - 30c per do/. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



Kai.i'H |. lioKDRN. \i!e»t. 7 North Cottage 
Ki'Wakh C. Khwaki>v Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN & DYER, Prop*. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club. 

Roister Holsters 

.Musical Association, 

Niueteeu Hundred Fourteen ln«l.\. 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stoekbridge Club, 



George II . Chapman, Secretary 

F. D. Griggs, 1'iesideut 

S. 1$. Freeborn, Manager 

L. Edgar Smith. Manager 

E. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, Manager 

( liokeliind. Manager 

J. W. T. Usure, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

J. D. Frenc h. Manager 

F. S. Clark, dr.. Manager 

II. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. (i. Davies, President 

.1. L Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, Presideut 

A. F. McDougnll, Presideut 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewklkv 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (JuiUr Strings 

AMHKK.vr, MASS. 
Next to Post Oflice. 



STEAM KITTING. 
GAS FITTING, TINNING. 



Telephone $0—4 



P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 

I.KAII LltiHTS, SCC. 

• Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 
XWltflat «& Oitssoii 

Catalogue* of 

1'isll «V Winter QOOda 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Collet- 
Studrnt". and Athletes who want the le-il. superior 
.iiticles lor the various sports should insist upon 
those Ije.iridK the Wright & Ditson 1 rade Mark 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




5kaCg5hoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wright ft Ditson (ioods are the -tandard I • 
all sports 
WMIOHT 4* DITSON 
.144 Washington M.. Boston, M 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

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4Jnl<keBt «ht«I.t, ».'•• Work, U»r« I'rlo 

All work carefully done. Work called for asd 
delivered, (rents' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suit* a specialty. 

Team* will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



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Tel. No. Hi t 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



JACKSON & CUTLEX 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Sods, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till n o'clock EVERY night 
Corner Amity and Pleasant Mreeta 



If you want to be 

••OLID WITH Mil OIKI.S 

you must have your clothes pre* .ed and cleaned 

AT EPSTEIBTS 



II Amity H. 



Maroon Stow 



Pressing ind Cleaning a specialty 

Most liberal ticket aywtetii In town 
Tol. 3U3-II 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOI 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE CO I 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rata* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



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1434-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa, 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATES 

The Republican gives the best report f 

Agricultural College and Amherst 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Daily, $8. Sunday, p. Weekly, *'• 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXIII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February u, 19 »3- 



No. 17 



RELAY TEAM LOSES MEMBER OF N. E. I. A. A. 



To Worcester "Tech" in Fast Race at 
B. A. A. Games Saturday Evening. 



The M. A. C. relay team lost its 

annual relay raee with the team from 

the Worcester Polytechnic institute. 

it the B. A. A. games in Mehanics 

hull, Boston, Saturday night. The 

time was :t minutes. L8 9-0 MM 1* 

tad while not remarkably fast OOftV 
pares well with the other collegiate 
times hung up that evening 

The Maroon and White runners all 
. 1 it I well and showed familiarity with 
the banks which speaks well for coach 
Dickinson's training methods. Clark 
v is first man for M. A. ('. and ran 
1 1 — t Warner. He jumped ahead 
of the Tech man at the pistol, held 
his lead throughout the three laps. 
and turned I one yard bad over to 
Baku*. Very. Tech's second man, 
started off like a whirlwind, passed 
bake mikI finished his (session on the 
k with a had of four yards. 
I.ldridge lost two more to Porter and 
pUift Whitney started the last 
p •lay six yards behind ••Dick" Keith 
the Tech captain and star intercolle- 
giate fftftl tei-miler The lead was 
(00 great to fti cut down and the 
I'.-eli llier's pace too fast. The 

shed with Keith ucai ly a .piait.r 
lap in the lead. This race is the 
..lily one lost to Won •. ftttf Tech. in 
, in that they have been pitted 
inst each oilier. 
2 he Harvard-Cornell race was tin- 
's est college relay of the evening. 
ard winning in I minutes, 1<> 
ds. A new record for this dis- 
fc was made by the It. A. A. 
1 £ earn when it covered the twelve 
1: ^ I minutes 7 1*9 seconds. 

, . elay race resulted as follows : 
. * t races (1999 yards)— Rhode 
Island State defeated New Hamp- 
shire state ; time, 8.S5 9-9. 

I'uiversity of Maine defeated Bow- 
doin j time, •'!. 19 I-"'- 

Tufts defeated University of \'«-r- 

t ; time. 9*91 4-9. 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
ktftd Massa.huset.to Agricultural 
• -liege ; time, 9*19 '!-•>• 
Boston A. A. defeated Irish-Ainer- 
.11 A. C. of New York ; time. .U)7. 
\ new record for 1999 yards. 
Harvard freshmen defeated Yale 
-hmen ; time, 9.1 1 1-9. 
Dartmouth defcate<l Massachu- 
Institute of Technology; time, 

1 1 i-;.. 

Harvard defeated Cornell; time, 

10. 

Relay race — Ford ham university 
-feated Boston college; time. 
18 8-9. 
Relay race (3120 yards)— Won by 

[Continued on page *l 



"Aggie" Admitted at Last Week's 
Meeting. Meet with Amherst Planned. 

TheMassaehusetts Agricultural col- 
lege was admitted to membership in the 
New l'.ngland intercollegiate athletic 
association at the annual meeting of 
that association held in the Hotel 
Lenox. Boston. Saturday morning. 
There is little doubt but that this 
action is due to the college's One 
ids made during the past few 
seasons when Caldwell ex-'lS was Of, 
the team. The Boston papers say I 
"this undoubtedly was done by the 
N K. 1. A. A. because of -Dave* 
Caldwell having decided to go to Cor- 
nell when he found it was impossible 
for him to compete at any of 
the intercollegiate ehainpionships." 
\\ h.ther or not this is the case, it is 
cei tain that the development of an 
(Mvinpic athletic inlbieiice.l the asso- 
eiation in their consideration. 
George Chapinaii'<»7, represented the 
college before the association 

The officers of the association 
elected are: President, K. K. Stone 
Of Dartmouth; \ ice-president. .1 . M. 
White of M. l.T ; secretary, C. J. 
Patten of Brown; treasurer, K. K. 
Pierce of W. P. I. Tit. executive 
committee is mad. up of President 
>t..ne, U D. Kobinsonof Brown, ami 
B K. Pierce of W. P. I. Three 
vacancies oti the committee are to be 
filled by President Stone 

'The track association has looked 
for this action on the part of the N. 
B. I A A- for nearly three years, 
und with the material in college 
developed to its full possibilities a 
, re.lital.le showing should be made at 
th. annual spiing meet of the asso- 
ciation. The oiit-l meet with 

Ainh.ist college to be held in May 
will determine what real material is 

available. 

'The other colleges in the New Kug- 
| :mi | intercollegiate athletic associa- 
tion are Amherst, Bowdoin. Brown, 
Daitmouth. Maine. M. 1. T., Tufts. 
Vermont. Wesleyan. WilliamB and 
W. P. I. 



TEAM SHOOTS 963 

In Match with Univ. of Maine Still 
Tied with Harvard and Columbia. 

The Massachusetts Aggie rifle 
team set up a new record for the 
milT in its match with the I'nivcr- 
ajtg of Maine last week. 'The team 
made | total of 899 for the live ftlgft- 
m looras. This total is 10 points 
Dtlow the league record of '.»7;'. which 



SPRINGFIELD DEFEATED 

In Interesting Hockey Osme. Score 
10-3. Hutchinson Stars. 

'The Massachusetts "-Aggies" de- 
feated the Young Men's Christian 
, ....elation college at Springfield 
Saturday afternoon in I well played 
hockev game l>> a score of l<> to 9. 
|| was the -Aggies'" second victory 
Of the season over the 'Training 



l.elow tlic league icc.M. 1 i.... lhl ,v.> 

Iheteam made in the championship school s..e„ and it was a b c.hu. 



match with b>wa last \ear, but with 
two months still ahead for this sea- 
son there is cvci\ reason to l.ebeve 
that last year's record will be broken. 
Last Tuesday's match was the llfth 
round in the series for the league 
ehainpionship. 'The Aggies are still 
tied with Harvard and Columbia for 
the top honors with Hi vi< t..iic- and 
mo defeats. It will be only a matter 
of a couple of weeks l.efore Harvard 
l, is Columbia and one of the tWO 

will fall. 'The AffUi ■»»• mfm 

been headed in any mat. h thus far. 
Thev continue to turn in the highest 
score each week. Harvard has 
ranked second best in each case and 
il Hie one team that looks at all dan- 
gerous at the present time. Tlu> 
match does not come until March 
h,, W e\ri. and by that time the 



Despite the one-sided score, 
lhl . mjnttsl mi sharp ami snappy 
throughout. Massachusetts <»'<- 

slaved Springfield from the start. 

The game was plaved on the Wat- 
,,,.1,.,^ pond. The absence of 
|„, :m lson all sides handicapped both 
teams and slowed ftp the game wh.n- 
the puek escaped from the play- 
ing surface. 'The ice was in excel- 
lent condition, hfttftf •■ -«0«99 *« 
glass. The -Aggies'' were the best 
skaters and they appreciated the 
change to |00d ie. after a week's 
ties ,,„ the rough surface of the 

campus pond. 

On the offense the Bay Stated 
rjtfffftd to be a fast cou.binalion- 
Ihe forward line was always on the 
alert and gene, ally all four men •> 
in their positions as they swept down 



MaS^husciV.h.,;,,,.., ....,..,., the ic. Int., *JV£ 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Association meetings have been 
.liscontinue.l during the period of 
unrest caused by the fever epidemic. 
However, with the beginning of the 
new semester the meetings will be 
resumed, '.nd student support is 
desired in a larger measure. 

George Zabriskic Jnd, will giv. a 
short talk, carrying out an aim of the 
association to have fellows briefly 
express their ideas in an informal 
talk Previous meetings have proved 
that such talks are interesting and 
, can bring out a good number of 
i fellows. 



-h.M.ting in top form. 

The team lost four excellent men 
through graduation last year. The 
men who have taken their places 
were all new at the game when tl.cv 
started in but they ate now shooting 
like veterans. Three of the first li\c 
men in last week's match which 
resulted in the score of 899 Ml not 
,, substitutes last yeai. < aptain 
K.lminster is making every effort to 
keep the trophy a fourth \ear and 
ilM a fifth. He is not only keeping 
the standard of this J ear's team at 
par hut In is also developing men for 
next season. 

Neal shot his first match in the 
absence of Criggs who was in I 
ton. His score of 1«7 was very 
creditable for I beginner and it is 
probable that he will be given more 
opportunities to demonstrate his abil- 
ity. Donnell, who has been doing 
bigfa grade work in daily practice, 
was also tried out but he had hard 
luck on his off hand attempt and lost 
his chance for a good score. 

The team fell down on its prone 
string. Kach man of the first live 
j dropped two points. This is a fail- 
ing, however, which can be easily 
; remedied by a little practice and it 



fought hard for scores but in the 
second period, with the game well in 
hand. th.\ stalled in to develop tea... 
,,|av I aptain Hutchinson and 

Jones had several opportunities to 
shoot from I distance or to carry the 
pad nearer thei.tsehes l-ul they 
alwavs passed to the wings, .lohn- 
son and Chishol.n were generally on 
the job and their shots went wide bv 
the narrowest of margins. 

The 'Aggi.'' defense was impref- 
„. lllH . .luring the first half. In the 

second session N Ihain and Arch. 

bald we,.- less watchful ami took I 
hand in carrying the puck up the ice. 
Bowers scored I pretty goal in the 
ea.lv pa*, of the half. He made a 
lOtg shot a little later, the puck 
delle.ting from Nec-Hiani's stick into 
the goal. Haskins, ex-*l. r », M. A. C. 
was in the goal for the Springfield 
men. He played I steady game in 
the face of a strong opposition ami 
stopped many shots which were 
t„gged for sure tallies. Captain 
Cochrane played a strong game at 
.ov.r-point. 

•-.lack" Hutchinson played his first 
game at rover and was all over the 
he. Five minutes hail elapsed when 
he scored his first goal. He followed 



remeuieu uj an*.-™ i" , t\.„ 

should not be difficult 10 pick up , with two more in short o.der. The 
seven or eight points this way in an j puck was continually in Springfield s 
important match. Following are the territory and only the good wo.k of 



scores of the men : — 



I ConMnuad on rata 2 J 



Haskins kept the score down Chis- 
holm and Johnson reached the net 







The College Signal, Tuesday, February n, , 9 , 3 . 






before the half closed. 

The second period had hardly 
opened before the Aggie captain had 
scored two more goals. Then the 
men started in to perfect their team 
play. Howcrs began to show all 
kinds of speed and succeeded in 
scoring two goals for his team. 
"I)ftt" Jones who had very few shots 
previous to this time took it upon 
himself to even up with the colored 
star and scored two for Massachu- 
setts. Kllis and Fernald replaced 
Brewer and Chisholm at this time. 
Bowers shot a hard oue at Kllis, the 
rubber boring its way clean through 
I In* netting. Jones was due for 
another goal and he made good just 
before the close. The line-up : 

**• A - c - SPRINGFIELD. 

Brewer, B. Ellis, g g, Haskins 

Archibald, p p , Taylor, Carson 

Needham, cp cp, Cochrane (capt.) 

Chisholm, Fernald, rw rw, Kllis, Kadie 
Hutchinson (capt,), r r. Bowers 

J° nes . t c, Kadie, Patterson 

Johnson, Iw | w , Patterson, Kllis 

Score- M. A. C. 10, Springfield 3. 
Coals— Hutchinson 5, Jones 3, Chisholm, 
Johnson. Referees- Surbeck of Spring- 
field and Mac Donald of If. A. C. 
Timers- Covill and Batchdder. Time— 
20 minute halves. 



STATE 



TEAM SHOOTS 


963 




[Continued from page 


U 




Si 


ending. 


Prone. 


Total 


A. F. Kdminster, 


<* 


«8 


■94 


J. T. Oertel, 


96 


98 


■94 


M. Headle, 


95 


98 


•93 


E. VV. Dunbar, 


94 


98 


ioj 


W. C. Forbush, 


9* 


98 


lyo 


C F. Hyde, 


90 


99 


189 


Neal, 


9° 


97 


187 


K. S. Weatherbee, 


»9 


98 


187 


1 v Clark, 


88 


98 


186 


Donnell, 


81 


97 


17.S 




•— - 


— — 





Total, 


911 


979 


1890 


N>tal for first five, 


9*>J 






Total for second five 


937 






Team total, 


1890 







RELAY TEAM LOSES 

(Continued from first page) 

Dartmouth, Harvard 2d, Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology 3d ; 
time, 7.14 l-.">. 

Colby defeated Bates; time, :i.|.*.. 

Georgetown defeated Holy Cross; 
time, 1*14 l-"». 

"H20 yards— Harvard defeated 
V;de ; time, 7.12. 

Boston A. A. (Caldwell ex-' 13 
running) defeated New York; time, 
7.1. J .{-.-). 

< ol 11 mbia defeated Syracuse ; time, 
3.U 2-5. 

Brown defeated Amherst; time, 
3.15. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

The Stockbridge club is continu- 
ing its plan of having interesting 
speakers address the club on various 
phases of agriculture. Prof. Sidney 
B. Haskell will address the club on 
Feb. 18 on "Farming with Dynam- 
ite." The talk will be illustrated 
with a set of slides furnished by one 
of the large powder companies. 
Everyone is invited to the talk which 
will be given in the Flint laboratory. 



COLLEGE STATE'S 
AFFAIR 

The. following editorial iu regard 
to the college appeared in a Boston 
paper last week : 

In a speech in Boston recently 
President Butterfield of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college de- 
scribed the institution as in a critical 
period and his judgment is confirmed 
by those who have given attention 
to the work of the college and its 
needs. Under an administration of 
great activity and enterprise, the col- 
lege has been expanding its work, 
making it more useful to the people 
of the state, adding to its force for 
substantial improvements in farm 
methods, and justifying as never 
before in its history the support of 
the state government. But just at 
the point when its broadened work is 
demanding a larger allowance from 
the treasury, there comes the unex- 
pected opposition of the governor of 
the state. Following this setback 
the college falls under the disap- 
proval of the new efficiency board, 
where it happens to be thefiist object 
of inquiry and to give the first oppor- 
tunity for the display of power by 
the new instrument of economy. It 
is denied, so far as the report of this 
board can deny, its needed appropri- 
ation. 

The agricultural college seems to 
be regsrded as a foreign institution, 
chiefly of interest to men employed 
in its work who make raids upon the 
state treasury and gather glory in 
proportion to the amount of money 
tliev can carry away. The manner 
of stand-off estimate is mischievous 
to the college, of course ; but is it 
not more so to the state? Actually, 
the college is the arm of the common- 
wealth for reaching the farmers, to 
give them skill in management and 
enlightment in methods. All the 
testimony of the times is to the point 
that the immediate and future wel- 
fare of the people demands this 
■fflaaHea of thought and training 
to the soil. Massachusetts, of all 
states, might be expected not to 
curb its effort to make its agriculture 
intelligent and effective in the inter- 
est of the people. It might be 
expected not to permit its great 
school of agriculture to falter or 
lessen in efficiency in the period when 
there is the loudest demand for the 
work of farm restoration and 
progress. 

The issue between the college and 
the state easily becomes institutional 
and personal. In common sense it 
is neither. Interesting and vigorous 
■ man as is the president of the col- 
lege, the college is not his affair. It 
is the state's, or to say it better, it is 
the state at work through one of its 
activities for a great purpose which 
it cannot neglect without injury and 
loss to itself. The Legislature is the 
agency by which the value of the 
work is best judged and the right 
conclusion effqeted as to the way the 
state shall continue it. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February n, 1913- 



CLOSING OUT SALE ! 

Skates and Skating Shoes 



$4 50 Skates, - 
$300 Skates, - 
$2.00 Skates, - 
$3.50 Shoes, - 
$3.00 Shoes, - 



Now $3.50 
Now $2.25 
Now $1.50 
Now $2.85 
Now $2.20 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Page's Shoe Store 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 




pheasant 

Bmttg St., 
Bmbcret 

Telephone 470 



I 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

1 Official Fraternity Jeweler 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHf ON 
ArTEKNOOK TEA 

Dinner if arranged for. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 



A 1 !■*>». AI,I)IC.X 
House Next to Laundry. 



SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Kobe, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E. B DICKINSON D. D.S. 

DRNTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amhirst, Mass. 

"mri Hours: 
8toiaA.M.l.UOtoaP.M. 



Fall i Winter Soils ft Overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order A Ready to Wear Suit* 

Latest Styles 
in Mackinaws 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Miss. 



H. B 

10 A lien Street 



WHITE 'I*. A rent 



HAVE YOU A COLD ? 

What Are Yon Doing For It f 



Don't neglect a cold, for neglect means needless worry and the probable 
development of serious conditions that are not so easily overcome. Come 
and get a box of our 

REXALL COLD TABLETS 

Price Sits Centst 



A complete relief that is quick and positive is enjoyed after a few Rexall 
Cold Tablets have been taken. It is a mighty wise policy to get a box and 
keep it in the house, so that you can nip a cold in the bud. 



Henry 



Co. 



The WIJXALL Store 



Oaa the Cornc 



Angier '13 



Tarbell '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANDV TONIC 

Kldtidge'14 Rendall '16 



PROFESSOR YEAW RESIGNS 
Prof. Frederick L. Yeaw of the 
class of 1905 has recently resigned 
his position as assistant professor of 
market gardening at the college to 
accept the position of general man- 
ager of the Pasis Knueh and Land 
Co. of Roswell, New Mexico. His 
resignation takes effect on Fel>. 14 
but Mr. Yeaw will leave for the West 
today. He will be succeeded by 
Pres. B. C. Georgia of Cornell 
university. 

Professor Yeaw ban li.ld bis pres- 
ent position at the college for two 
years, and during that time has done 
much to strengthen the course in 
market gardening given at this insti- 
tution. He came to M. A. C. from 
California where he was engaged as 
plant pathologist in the California 
experiment station. 

BIBLE STUDY COURSES 
The Bible study committee of the 
Christian Association announces its 
courses for the coming semeM. 1. 
The courses will run for al>out ten 
weeks and it is bopai that the classes 
will be of good size. Prof. Kohert 
J. Spiague, "New Testament Eth- 
ics"; Dean E. M. Lewis, "Parahlen 
of the Bible"; Prof. A. A. Mackim- 
mie, -Life of St. Paul"; and Ralph 
J. Watts, "Life of Christ." 

The first two courses are open U> 
juniors and seniors while the last 
two are oj>en to sophomores and 
freshmen. 



SWEATERS 

and 
MACKINAWS 










The Fall season is the Sweater time of the year. The Football 
games call for Mackinaws and Sweaters. We are showing the 
best styles of the best makers. No fancy !>rif-s in this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50, $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 




Industry is the 
price which the gods 
mark on their choic- 
est prizes. 

To produce tobac- 
co like 





SMOOTHEST 
TODACCO 



cunwf 

i '«* 

I ;ri uilk 

humidor 
topt. 



requires skill, dili- 
gence and infinite 
watchfulness. Choic- 
est Burley leaf is care- 
fully aged until no 
trace ofharshness re- 
mains. The result is 
a smoke of satisfying 
smoothness and de- 
lightful richness. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

School ana College Photographers , . , 




LOCALLY' 5* Center St.. Northampton Mass., 
L^f^ALLT. 5 and South Had | cy) Mass. 



Ilffl 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studio* offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

g:\/ervtHing Electrical 



MGDRO * Z 5s 



.^ Minimize your fountain pen ^ 

^^ trm.hlP* bv owninft a Moore's. C It Is tne W*l 
American Fountain Pen Company 

Aims. CusMn* * »—. ""-ySJ^AM 
M DEVONSHIRE STREET I. 









The College Signal, Tuesday, February n, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February n, 19*3 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD 07 EDITORS 

R. H.VAN/.WALKNHURr, 'n.Kditor in-Chief 
CHKSTKR K.WHKCLEI M.ManaKingEditor 
OSCAR G. ANDERSON 'i\ Assistant Editor 
FREDERICK D. GR IC.GS '13. Athletic Editor 
S. MII.I.ER JORDAN '13, Athletic Editor 

HARRY W. AM. EN '13. Alumni Editor 

ERVINE F. PARKER "m. Alumni Editor 

HAROLD C. BLACK '14, Department Editor 
J. ALBERT PRICE 'i?. Associate Editor 

GEORGE E. DONNELL 'i*. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE ad. '13. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLA R K.I R.'u.Asst Bus Manager 
ERNEST P. UPTON '14. Asst. Adv. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl GH'15, Circulation 



Subscription $1 50 per vear. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
George Zabriskie ?nd. 



CrnSfVfJ SS 

PM Ofttc* 



of such a policy now, but we hope 
tin' promise of leniency will be re- 
membered if like conditions should 
ever arise again. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
theSir.NAL Office or handed to Stuart B. Foster 
14, on or before .Saturday preceeding each issue. 1 

Kin. 13.— M. A. C. C. A. Chapel, 
6-45 f. m. 
14.— Hockey, M. A. C. vs. M. 
I. T., Pratt Kink, 5-00 

1*. M. 

1(J. — Sunday chapel. Dr. Kd- 
ward S. Vinde of Prov- 
idence, R. I., 9-15 a. M. 



• (■'•»• mjtler «| the Amherst 



Vol. XXIII. Tt'F.siiAV. Fkh. 11. No. 17 

The. news that the track associa- 
tion of this college has bees admitted 
to membership in Mic New England 
intercollegiate athletic association 
will prove very welcome to all friends 
of the college. It ma\ not Si I 11- 
tirely unexpected in view of the fact 
that a petition of almost three years' 
standing has been strengthened by 
the development here of a runner who 
won a coveted position on the Ameri- 
can Olympic team. Track material 
at this college compares very favor- 
ably with that of many of the other 
colleges in the association, and this 
added incentive of olllcial recogni- 
tion of athletic merit will go far to- 
ward developing the material we have. 

The rules of the intercollegiate 
association require that a team win 
at least one point in three years of 
the annual out-door meets of the New 
England colleges in the organization. 
This should not prove a bar to con- 
tinued membership in the associa- 
tion. Track athletics are bound to 
•'boom" and to occupy an increas- 
ingly prominent position at M. A . € 



Aftkii the epidemic of scarlet 
fever with its resulting commotion 
and unsettledncss. the student body 
had a right to expect if not leniency. 
absolute fairness in the matter of ex- 
aminations. With very few excep- 
tions the final examinations have 
l<eeu made out willi this idea, but in 
one or two instances the oppos i t e has 
been the case, and at a time so soon 
after such general excitement, ex- 
aminations of such I type seem par- 
ticularly ''small" and mean. It sel- 
dom becomes an undergraduate pub- 
lication to "call down" members of 
the faculty, but we ask : is it fair to 
give the class, hardest hit by the 
epidemic, examinations bristling with 
catch-questions and then to "stick" 
over forty of the class in the exam ? 
All sympathy with the student body 
appears to be lacking, when a man 
will give such an examination. It 
mav be too late to remedy the results 



CAMPUS NOTES 

According to the list of "flunks," 
I iSOSttd 'evacuation' is taking place. 

A small but enthusiastic band of 
rooters shivered and shouted at the 
Training school game Saturday. 

A basketball team from the college 
called the "collegians" were defeated 
in Greenfield Wednesday evening. 

The recent cold snap has made the 
hockey season a possibility and the 
management is cheerful again in a 
mild way. 

Monday was an anxious day for 
many of uncertain standing, who 
awaited the "returns" at the regis- 
trar's oilice. 

The lunch-room is having a sudden 
rush of business now that a "month 
in advance" is necessary to "get by" 
the treasurer. 

The treasurer is now reaping his 

■ ml harvest. Two crops ii e 

year — there must lie something in 
farming, after all. 

"Hone" Caldwell was on the cam- 
pus for a day of two last week. He 
ran with the track men to keep in 
trim for the B. A. A meet. 

A ventilator should be installed in 
the southwest corner of the "hash 
house" to remove the smoke and gas 
emanating from that region 

The Social luion entertainment 
scheduled for Saturday evening was 
postponed because of the fact that 
most of the men had gone home. 

The freshman and sophomore 
debating teams will debate this even- 
ing in chapel, while the juniors and 
seniors compete on Thursday even- 
ing. 

Competition between the "drill 
Room" and the "Dogcart" does not! 
seem to be very keen. The propn- i 

etore of the latter neteMiehmeit en 

still smiling. 

Once more the bread line makes 
its appearance. Sleep as late as you 
like and if the waiter suggests an 
alarm clock walk over to the counter 
and give him the ha, ha. 

A chapter of the Knights of the 
Round Table has l>een established 
in our midst. It's a safe bet that the 
"grub" will not be quite the same 
as that which is handed the lowlier 
mortals. 

The hockey game scheduled for 
Friday with R. P. I. was can- 
celled. Friday morning Manager 



Little received word that five of the 
R. P. I. team had failed their exami- 
nations and would he unable to com- 
pete. 



Have Your Shoes Repaired Willi 



OUR SPECIAL 



THOMAS VINCENT CANNON iii « q - - 

Thomas Vincent Connon, the fourth Wudl ~ |)I00I Uulu Ludll(ul 

victim of the scarlet fever epidemic, i 

died in the hospital Monday morning, 

Feb. 10th. The disease early proved 

serious in his case and his death was Costs you no more than the ordinary 

hastened by pneumonia. Cannon kind — will wear nearly twice as long. 

was 21 years of age and came from 

Newton. He was enrolled as a 

special student. 

Prompt Service Strictly 
First-class Work. 



Academy 
of Music. 



WEEK OF FEBRUARY 10 




The Nonnampion Players 



i\ 



The Lottery Man 

EVERY EVENINU AT 8.00 
Prices 2Sc. 50c and 78c 



Wed. and Sat. Mats, at 2:15 

Price* 2Sc and 50c 



E. M. BOLLES 



THE IHOEMAN 



Cooler's fiotel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



Write Ideas for Moving Picture Plays ! 



! 



"\7"OTT CAN W *ITE PHOTO PLAYS AND 
IvU EARN $25.00 OR MORE WEEKLY 

We Will Show You How ! 

If you have ideas — if you can think — ^e will show you the secrets 
of this fascinating new profession. Positively no experience or literary 
excellence necessary. No "flowery language " is wanted. 

The demand for photo plays is practically unlimited. The big film 
manufacturers are " moving heaven and earth " in their attempts to get 
enough good plots to supply the ever increasing demand. They are 
offering fioo and more, for single scenarios, or written ideas. 

We have received many letters from the film manufacturers, such as 
VITAGRAPH. KDISON, ESSANAY, LUBIN, SOLAX. IMP, RKX, 
RELIANCE. CHAMPION, COMET, MELIES, ETC., urging us to 
send photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets of success. 

We are selling photo plays written by people who " never 
before wrote a line for publication." 

Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
good idea every week, and will write it out as directed by us, and it 
sells for only $25. a low figure. 

You Will Earn $100 Monthly For Spare Time Work. 

Tn-DTTvrn SEND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AT ONCE FOR FREE COPY OF 
J? HHj-Ej o UR ILLUSTRATED BOOK, " MOVING PICTURE PLAYWRITIN6 M 

Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what this 
new profession may mean for you and your future. 



NATIONAL AUTHORS' 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



THE WORK OF THE DEPART 
MENT OF BOTANY 

The course given in Botany at- 
tempts to cover the subject of plants 
in a general and comprehensive way. 
Speetsl attention, however, is given 
to those sub-divisions <»f the science 
,,f botany which especially concern 
the agriculturist either in a practical 
or technical way, while such sub- 
divisions as systematic botany, and 
cytology, which at the present day 
have less utilitarian value, are con- 
sidered only in a general way. 

All the courses, except those given 
in the sophomore year, are elective. 
The required course given in the 
-ophoinore year is general and lay* 
the foundation for I knowledge of 
plant structure and function. The 
elective courses given in the junior 
oh! senior year include plant pathol- 
ogy, cryptogamic botany, plant 
physiology, and others, most of which 
arranged so as to emphasize the 
practical side of Itotany. Some of 
these subject- have a more practical 
hearing than others, ami some count 
more as training courses than others. 
For many years the tendency in 
nee has l»eeii to develop the 
powers of obsei vatiou. technique. 
etc. rather than to convey knowledge. 
iid the latter, although important, is 
incidental as compared with the train- 
ing obtained. 

It is impossible to supply the 
demand for men trained in all 
branches of agriculture at the present 
time, and in liotnny there is an 
specially large demand for men 
tiaiued in plant pathology. ba< •teri- 
nlogv, etc as well as for teachers in 

! Is : consequently the couis.s 

offered here aim to meet the demand 
for men. 

The department occupies a build- 
unexcelled in the Tinted State* 
in its line, being provided with well 
lighted laboratories, experiment 
greenhouses, aquaria and necessary 
Apparatus for routine or research 
«ork. 



Dartmouth defeated the Springfield 
Y.M.C.A. college at Springfield 
last Thursday b\ I I SO I store. 
Massachusetts played the same team 
on Saturday and won out 1<> to .'5. 
Captain Cochrane said alter the 
game that in his judgement the 
Aggie offense was superior to that of 
the Hanover men, hut othciwise the 
team- were evenly snatched. Tomor- 
row's game, providing weather con- 
ditions are favorable, promises to be 
■ buttle royal. 

Dartmouth debuted Vale on Fri- 
day by | score of 8 to >. A victors 
OVef the green on their own rink is 
all the more desirable. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 
SERIES 

The interclass basketball series 
will be begun Saturday night in the 
drill hall. Two gBBMS will be 
plavcd. one between the seniors and 
sophomores and the other bOSWOSS 
the freshmen and juniors. Each 
team will play three games. OM with 
each of the other class teams. 

The seniors, while they will have 
■SVSfSl well-known names in their 
line-up. will have to dispel the gen- 
eral idea that they are "has 
when they stnek-up against the soph- 
omores. Criggs. Covil. Huntington, 
Samson and probably Gore will be 
on the senior team. Howe has beea 
ill and it is doubtful if he "ill In- 
able to play even if he returns to 
college before Saturday. The jun- 
iors will be able to form a fust quin- 
tet from the following: Smith, I'.d- 
gertou. Davies, Brewer. Christ i« 
Hadticld. Harris and a number of 
lease i lights. The sophomore team 
will remain intact from the game of 
two weeks ago: Smith, Frost. Dob. 
Little and Mdican. The light fresh- 
man team which so unexpectedly 
took the measure of the sophomores 
will line up against the juniors as 
follow- Moses, Ibed. Hall. Layman 
and Kcegan. The games are being 
run under the direction of the senate 



HOCKEY AT DARTMOUTH 
The hockey team will leave on the 
II train from Northampton tomor- 
ow morning for Hanover where 
Dartmouth will be met on the i< e for 
the second match of the season 
v cen the two teams. The green 
. the game which was played here 
on the campus rink in January by 
the small margin of 1 to <». The 
M was a farce as far as real 
• key was concerned as the iee was 
in inch deep in slush and water. 
Dartmouth has had a long season 
I has been very successful. Hel- 
en arc more seasoned than the 
-sachusctts men who have- been 
I back by no place to practice. 
Aggies, through the courtesy of 
Amherst college management, 
bad the use of Pratt rink for 
ral days during the past week 
tft undoubtedly as strong as 
have been at any time this 
•>n. 



PUT A kl HOT ON£ 

OVER THE PI.ATK M 

EVERY M A. C mm #*1 m%mh\ thai ike final ten of tetc quality <>f ■ potato 
is when it is placed on the table- when you put a "hot one" over Hi. plate, 
one hot bom the oven alonj; with a jim \ st.-A « mashed with • country 
sausage or even plain boiled with codfish ind < ream (containing .o ksM a sus- 
picion of crea»). After testing such I potato, one can well subs, i fee to the toast : 

"The Irishman; God bless him fa 
persisting in existing on the pOtStO 

lly so doing he has directed the stteotfat oi hummity to the psttoooaih 

virtues of the solarium tuberosum, satire of S.uth America, but popular l\ 

known as the " Irish " potato. 

And What la It? When a farmer s.-lls a bushel I perfect potatf 
weighing «> lb*., he delivers 48 lbs of water, 10 lbs. oi condensed sun 

shine in the shape of starch ami two lbs ol mineral which is ot the 
the earth entity, and yet it is wuhin man's p.. am to so influence lh« 
relation m arrangement of the water, the st.irrl. ..n.l the mm.-r.ds m 
the tttbei by breeding of seed, by cultivation, fertilization and Iprsj 
lug, as to produce vtti almost fthsofolC I . -riamty. in normal seas... -, .. 
loo'tlisomr, wholesome vegetable the BeHghl of nm man's tabic. 

m It J/A T do you know about (Jt.it 
Has the Fertilizer amtliinr to ,/o with it 
STUDY the I'laut i'otul I'robUm / 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 






F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimcr's 
Fine Clothes 

FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 

Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 







I !; 



JUNIOR BANQUET 
The junior banquet committee ha* 
fixed upon the date for the iinnnnl 
elMl biin.jiiet. which will be held this 
M l| M.uch 1 I. Si the Hotel Kimbnll. 
Springfield. It in planned to h.ive 
the hi.nqnet follow along the line of 
similar l!*ll functions, and by hold- 
ing the festivities so mar Amherst it 
is 'hoped that the entire class can be 
gathered together for the occasion 
The ooCBOrfttM consists of Kdwards 
(chairman), Black, Towers. Leon 
Edgar Smith and N K. Walker. 

NEW CATALOG OUT 
The 1913 issue of the college cata- 
log is now readv far distribution. 
Pesides the faculty and class lists, it 
contains detailed descriptions of the 
courses offered, and considerable 
information of general interest. 
Considerable space is devoted to the 
outlining of entrance recpiimnentH. 
All prospective students of the col- 
lege mav obtain a copy o r the cata- 
log by addressing Pres. K. L. Butter- 
field. 



That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C A K. 

ZJAMI^IO^a Sole A«^«t. 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow ho* he l.kcd 

DRESS SUITS 



his. 



-We make them all and make them right at- 








Is/L 

College Storeej, 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February n, 1913 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February it, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iro* and Bfl ss Pip*, Valve» 
and Pitting! | ( ,r Staam, Watrr ;in«l da-. \sl>e>tos 
and M.iyin-si.i Botla* an.i I'n* Coverings, ripe 
Cut to sketch. Mill Supplies. Engiteers and 

Contractors for Meant .Hid Hot \\ ;. l»-r ll.-;itir>fc. 
Automatic Sprinkler .Systems, Hi.ilei snrl Kngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mass. 



theTlachers Exchange 



Of Button 



120 liu) /it un Si, 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C&rptrvter St Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE NEW BOY AT WORK 
Rehearsals of u The New Boy" la 
preparation for tpproadiiiig dates 
will »|a«i Friday night after an 
enforced idleness of a month. The 
next appearance <>f the Roister Dofev 
ters sooordiag t<» Manager Jonas, will 
be in (iivfiiiicld, Feb. L'.'>th, under 
the anspicee <»t* the loeal high sohool. 
The dean iriiling, s farther perfona- 
saee will he gives in Notfc Droofcfteld, 
taking the place <>f the one oaaoslled 
by the learlei fever o ntb reah With 
the p r eao af outlook, the Preen, per- 

forma nee. winding ii|> the SCSSOn, 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready nt the start to finiush you with a tine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, slso Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and I'. iti.iu.s lor the very 
best work. 



Morehouse Since IfiiS he has beei 
an instructor in criminal piTsOOOChlli 
in the Yale Law school and is now 
gradoate instructor in medical juris 
prudence. He has also edited v:ti 
ions Inw hooks. Mr. Webb watt 1 
number of the Connecticut ( onstitn 
tioind convention in 1 90S and is sj| 
active in stall politics. Mr. Wei 
was married June 29, 1**0 to Mis- 
Helen M. Ives, of Mt. Cartnel ( onn 
and seven children have been hoi, 
to them. He is a member of the 
Catholic club of New York Cit\ 

the Graduates dab of New Hn\ 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK, Amherst 



H. M Ktx.KRs, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



AMessage toAppleGrowers 

raoM 

MR. THOMAS W. STECK, of Opequon, Va. 

W'NNER OF THE EASTERN APPLE TROPHY 

THE 175000 PRIZE CUP DONATED BY THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 
AT THE AMERICAN LAND AND IRRIGATION EXPOSITION 

JyTR. STECK, the winner of 
the magnificent Eastern 
Apple Trophy, has written 
an account of his life work in 
apple growing that should 
prove an inspiration to every 
fruit grower. 

He tells of one block of 300 trees that 
returned $17,974.33 in nine years. 

He describes his methods of Pruning, 
Cultivation, Spiaying and Fertilization. 

The whole s'ory is given just as written 
by Mr. Steck in our new booklet en- 
titled, "The Winning of the Cup," a 

copy of whiili is yours if you will 
write for it t rcmptly. 

A striking feature of this competition is, that it 
developed after the prize was awarded, that 
Mr. Steck raised his prize winning fiuit with 
COE-MORTIMER FERTILIZERS, which he 
has used for the past two years ; purchasing 
them n the open maiket, from one of the Coe- 
Mortimer local agents at Winchester, Va. 

Thus the superior quality of COE-MORTIMER 
FERTILIZERS for fruits is again confirmed. 

If, when you write us, you will te'l us the 
brand or make of fertilizer you are now using, 
we shall be glad to send you one of our handsome 1913 Calendars. 

Why Nol Put Your Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing Ycur 

Fertilizers from 

The Coe-Mortimer Company, 51 Chambers Street, New York City 





Cvst <»i "Tin Ni u Iti.i" 

will take place in Northampton .uid ranks e\hemelv high in the legal 
Thursday. April 17th, the evening world. This :ippointtiicnt to tin 



before the junior prom. 
The parts of X<tn<>/ snd Bullock 

Mnjnr will both be taken by new men ter and ability. 
SS Wilkins *U ami Q. F. lb. we M.!. 

taking tho se parte, are onl of oollegi 

through sickness. (Communications to the Sign* I con.r- 



Superior Court of Connecticut is h 
well earned testimonial of hiaeharai 



COMMUNICATIONS 



nLittrio of general inteie*l aie art-Icon ol 

i i>. not It !)• held responsible !■ I 
opinions thus expressed.) 



JAMES H. WEBB 
Governor Simeon E. Baldwin, of ToTani Kprroa oi Tan Hionai 

/>"//• Sit 



Connecticut, has recently sent to the 
Genera] Assembly for confirmation 
the mime of James II. Webb. Mas- 



In the edition of the song boos 

which appeared last year, there it 



sacfanestts Agricultural college. '7.;. song called the college hymn, but 

of New Bates, Conn., to be &Se» '"'" " |:, ".V of ■■ tret realize tl,,' 

ciate .Judge of the Superior < ourt.T 11 .' "''"^ ^^ Ag!,i "' "'" 
,, „ . . , . , I chapel exercises are led bv a certain 

If this appointmenl is approved A j^Umot who as . rule conduct* 

.lu.lge Webb will take ollice Nov l's, then, so that twosoiigsaresung.it 
l!»l I. upon expiration of the term of seems to meet the approval of all. 
olllee of the present Judge Marcus ' r »stly. it is a question whether an 



II. Ilolcomb. of Southington. 

.Fames Henry Webb is the son of 

Connecticut parents, but was born in 



alumnus returning to visit coll< 
would find any exceptional IntC 
in the chape! exercises. Putting 
these three facts together, would 



Santa I'e. New Mexico. Dec. 22, j not be of advantage to have the col 

1854. His parents was .lames .I.j ,e f?»' hymn sung every morning 

and Flotilla Slade Webb. He w ,s ! **»*"*' ^n alumnus then ret.n 
, . ,, . , 10 college would find a deep ml. 

graduated from the Massachusetts ;,, ,;;.;.,., i.. . i • i i 

■ **" I in visiting chapel, in order to In 

Agricultural college in the class of j the old college hymn sung as 

used to hear it. Two songs in 
morning would not lengthen the - 

let. n Japan, 7*? , 'T"- h u \ " Kikv '* wearisome- 

1'iit rather would sound a word 

praise for alma mater every mornli 



'7 '-. and had for his classmates the 
late David PenhalloW, who assisted 
l'resi, 

and Dr. Charles Wellington of this 
college. Mr. Webb continued his 

education at Vale Law School from 
which he was graduated in 1*77, re- 
ceiving his degree <""< Imnlr. He 
was admitted to the bar the same 
year and is at present a member of 
the law linn of Ailing. WeU, lV 



i.. i . 



To thk Bottom o* ran Sk.nai. : 

Dim- Sirs: 

On Friday evening at the "mo\ i> 
the management stopped the thoa 
give a talk to the assembled audieix 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



Those who KNOW 
Buy the De Laval 






Crcimerynwn He. mnc lhaj si aasawtt 

the h.uidlini; of Ciesai an<i know l>> k 

erteaca Out the !>•• Laval skims t ■ 

Sad araarl Innne^t lit is wfe) i?4 

ne World's ire.iine krs use the 1 »•• 

■ Laslral] 

It perk need Dairymen The Da Laval 
is the universal favonte among '"« oa*»J 

men I tt ' - s knowth.tt i thet separator 

will k i v e litem sack aatiafar ton, sat vice. 

old De Laval Daera— \Vhe"e.er i man 

III ! ill ol<l mode! I ir L.iv.il de 
to inuchrfse a Liter st> le m u lime he 
Ml hu>t another l>e l...v.il 

Wen Who Investigate — in no. e the\ 
,i barga mahwit] of he Laval ma 

chines in u-r that th i hv the 

■ intormed usei -eVeiN where . that they 
I t up Ih-sI 111 use. and that their us.is 



ie-tter satisfied than overs ,,f 
• rs. 



i.th.-i 



The De Laval Separator Co. 



1(7 IJroadway, 
Near York 



i9 K. sliolWon »i.. 
< lurairo. 



on their behavior during the nerfor- 

mance. The trend of its remarks 

was good, but when in those remarks, 
it gave the information that it was 
talking only to the agricultural stu- 
dent-. I fear that it went I good 
deal beyond ItS depth. One reason 
for thiols, that the group to which 
it apparently directed the greatei 
part of its remarks, was made up of 

representatives of practksalrj every 

element in town, so that this particu- 
lar remark was unpardonable. To 
bo knre, ItS remarks were ri^ht, but 
Us manner of gidug them out was 
far from logical. Again, It will be 
reincmlieivd that the trouble s week 

was caused by whirling, not 

shrilling, but whistling in many dif- 
ferent keys by those present. Now 

I took special none,- of this condi- 
tion, and found that the trouble could 
be laid principally to the musician, 
an employee Of the management. 
u| m in the Course Of one tune, 
changed the key at least four or live 
times. The whistling, which was 
not bothersome when in key with the 

piano, naturally was disagreeabli 
each new key 'brought in additional 

whistling. If the management hi to 
kick on EtoOade, it is lime it looked to 
its own part of the contract lepie- 
seiiled bv the ten-cent admission 
price. The eonduct mi Friday eve- 
ning was good, except in one Spot, 

where the same pereea nt persons 

caused the disturbance c\ei\ time. 
and it is not yet pioveii tO the satis- 
faction of anyone, whether it wafl an 
presentalive, or ■ member 

of SJM one of theothei SOOTS or more 

of elements which 000 finds in an\ 
group of human beings. 

K. w. • • 



his family, our deepest sympathy in 
this their hour of grief, and M it 
further 

hVsofsetf, That a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to the bereaved 
family, and that a copy be published 
in the ( oi i i ..i Sh.\ m . 
F. H. Si i ki:i -;<.. j 

Q, I.. EUa, Committee, 

F. II. liicHAaiio, \ 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line oi College Supplies 
may be found at 



ALUMNI NOTES 
The Marlboro M. A. < ( lub held 
its annual reunion and supper 
recently Prof. F. A. W augh was 
the guest and speaker. 

'8.H. Fred S. Coolcy has com- 
pleted the successful management of 
I ten-days' country life convention at 
the Montana State college at Ib./.e- 
uian. Mont. With him on the college 
faculty are K. A. Coolcy '\K>. state 
entomologist and professoi of ento- 
mology ami SOOSngy, J. !»• I'alket 
•us. assistant entomologist and 11. 
M .letinisoii 'us. instructor in botany 
and bacteriology. 

•ics.- s. c. Uaeon. from 64 Rsrtfors 
Ave.fJcrsej < Ity to WndlviHe Uldg., 

South I'laininghain- 

'i i. Herbert H , Blaaey oatted oa 

college friends la-t week. He SJ 
employed in landscape work in Ohio. 

'12. Tin eaojaajsn*enl has been 

annoiineed of JeSSS Catpeiitei. .1 1 .to 
Miss I.Uie M Wells of Attleboio. 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

icing baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

Don't Porjttt 

That we are carrying a good line of 
— Tobficoo 



eiROSUl '13 



FARRER 15 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



RESOLUTIONS 
Hlnena, It has pleaeed <i<nl in 

His infinite Wisdom SO take to Him- 
self the father of our beloved fri.nd 

and brother, Edward Stephen Ooaa 

Daniel, therefore be it 

BfaajfseeT, That we. the imMiib. i - 

of the <^. T. V. fraternity, do extend 
to his family, our deepest sympathy 
in this their hour of grief, and la- it 
further 

ji,snir,.i. that i copy of thaee res 

oltltioiis be sent to the bereaved fam- 
ilv. that a copy be published in the 
( oi i I-.. i si. .ski. and that a copy be 
inserted in the records of the 
Fraternity. 

.1. D. ram* ... ) ,, ul thl , 

11 N I^'m.m. ,,,,,,,., |lltv . 

S. H. IlUKI'.oliN. ) 



HIGH GRADE WORK 
A Specialty of College Classes 



>i Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



117/' r. 00, It has pleased GrOd in 
His infinite wisdom, tO take to Him- 
self the father of our beloved friend 
and classmate. Fdward Stephen Coen 
Daniel, therefore be it 

/,VW,<d. That we the members Of 
the class of r.»l'.. dO extend SB his 

family, our de e p e st sympathy in tins 

their hour of grief, ami DO it further 
llsetf, that a copy of the-.,. 

resolutions be senl to the bereaved 

familv. that a copy bo publishe<l in 
the (oil ,ii. i Mi.nvi.. and that a 
copy be inserted in the lOOOrOal of 
the class. 
Hai.cii .1. BOKDI S, / |. ur ,| 1( , 

Hawold It. Bt ssi i .i. Ctaaa. 

R. II. v vs Zwm.im'.i no, ) 




or 



C. R. ELDER 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Fn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER FXI'KNSFS Fnable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 

COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



ffi 



Makers 
it 



CAR A GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At 
lanoc to the I'aci6c. Claaa Contract* a 
Specialty. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



»7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



H'h<rr,is. It has pl eas e d Cod in 
His infinite wledom, tO take to Him- 
self oiii beloved friend. Thomas Vin- 
cent Cannon, therefore be it 

Resolved. That we. the unclassilied 
students of M. A. C. do extend to 



Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company- 

■ u.iAtian I MM 

Sti.I'MKN Lani: F"i'<ii:i< 

MANITACI'I IIIMI .!> " I I. KM 



1MO BnOADWAY. 



N I ;w VOKK 



Chttd only from I A. M. to 4 A. M. 



<■!,! It \NI» CX>t.L.K50at 

PINS AM* KIMiS * 
UOLU, HILVSK AND UHOMZK MROAl.M 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes Siiined and Polisned 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open Hnmlay Main NI. 

On way to Post Office. 




I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February it, 1913. 



PLAYING 

CARDS 




DEUEL'S 



DRUG STORE 



Aiiiliemt, Miimk. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Gradt Collect Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts, 


10-15C 


Collars, 


2 l-JC 


Curls, - 


* 1 -;c 


Plain wash, 


48c per dog, 


Same, rough dry, 


• 30c per do/.. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Hum J. Horhkn. A Bent. 7 Nurth Cottage 
K.UWAKU C. Eiiwaiius, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose • Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN A DYER, Prop*. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



The Massachusetts AericulturalCoto 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association. 

Truck Association. 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Hide club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference. 

stock bridge Club, 



Qeorge II. Chapman, Secretary 

F. 1). (.riggs, Piesideut 

S. It. Freeborn, Manager 

L. Edgar Smith, .Manager 

K. H. Cooper, Manager 

• W. S. Little. Manager 

('. llokeluml, Manager 

J. W. T. Lesure, Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

•I. 1). Freneli, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

II. M. Rogers, Manager 

I.. (.. Davies, President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little. President 
A. F. MeDougall, President 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON &f CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock KVERV night 
Carnrr Amity and Pleasant Street* 



If von want to he 

SOI. IO WITH THK (illtl.s 

70a must have your clothe* pressed and cleaned 

AT EPSTEIN'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



Pressing- and Cleaning a specialty 

Moat liberal ticket 8y»ietu In town 
Tel. MaVSl 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelky 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (Juitar String 

AMHKKST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone $9-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Liohts, &c. 
t Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 

Wrlglit «3fc lMta.011 

Catalogues of 

Infill Ac Winter Qoodfl 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Col 
students and Athletes who want the real, supeooi 
articles lor the various sports should insist 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson trade Mark 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat K Shoe - 
Sweaters 
Jersey* 
f/ Uniforms 
for all sports 



Wright & Ditson Goods are the standard ! 1 
all sports 

xv ,*i« : 1 1 I- .v DirauN 

I44 Washington M . Boston, M 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

(juLkeat srrvlcr, He. I Work, l.one.l I'rl.e 

All woik carefully done Work called for and 
delivered, lo-nts' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suits a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. 



I el. No. 34] 4 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOI 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1814 by Samuel Bowies 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCATES 

The Republican gives the best reports 0! 

Agricultural College and Amherst 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 
Makers of '« Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. I i *"t* **• Sunday, %*. Wahiy, %i 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. pest each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Raaaanable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. BY. CO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XX11I. 



Amherst. Mass., Tuesday, Kebruar) «8, 1 9 • 3- 



No. 18 



DARTMOUTH WINS AGAIN C. S. C. NOW A NATIONAL 



TRACK TEAM 



By Score of 5-3 in Close and Exciting 
Game at Hanover. 

The M. A. ('. hockey team suf- 
I its second consecutive defeat 
this nntl at the hands of Dart- 
mouth Wednesday to the tune of a 
MOM at Hanover. A clear cold 
.lav and unusually good ice made the 
IMM sharp and snappy throughout. 
Although the Green team was some- 
what addicted to roughness, the con- 
i.vealcd some excellent team 
«ork on both sides. 

Dartmouth took the initiative at 
the start and kept the puck in 
;.'s territory until a chance open- 
ing gave Dcllmger opportunity to 

slide the puck over, scoring one for 
1 1 itmouth. The tide then turned 
tot a few moments and after receiv- 
ing a clever pass from Captain 
Hutchinson, .Jones tied the MOM. 
•mouth. how.vei. st m.i 1 shifted 
unil ittOM to the Aggie end of the 
rink. Brewer as goal tender made 
1 \ 1 ptionally ditllcult stops, 
hut hick seemed to favor tie 

ii. Tuck managed to manipulate 
DM rubber into the cage and it had 
luirdlv been put into play again 
. \\ iiiainaker 

M A. C. had the :id\:iutage again 
foi a few moments but Tuck and 
\\ iiiainaker soon had the puck under 
their control again and when the 
whittle blew at the end of the half, 
both Frost and Wanamaker had each 
-«■< uied another goal. Score: M A. 
< I. Dartmouth '». 



Installed as the Gamma Chapter of At Columbia Meet in New York Gets 
Alpha Sigma Phi on Friday. Fourth Place in the Relay. 

On Friday theC S. C Fraternity of The varsity relay team VM eadl} 

the Massachusetts Agricultural college defeated at the Columbia meet held 

\\ as formally installed asdainina chap- in the 71st icgiiiienl armory. New 

ter of Alpha Sigma I'hi fraternity at V.rk. Saturday night. The team was 

Masonic hall, the installation l»an- pitted against Hrow n, Fordhain. New 

<piet following at the Amherst Ibmse. York university, Manhattan cllcj. 

Alpha Sigma l'hi was established and Weslevan in the one mile relay, 

at Yale in 1H4.'», ami reorganized class It (scratch). Weslevaii failed 

upon its present basis in I'.miT. It to put in an appearance and the ti\ e 

numl.ers chapters from the Atlantic teams started the race w ith Fordham 

U> t*M PMtfic. The C S. ( . frater- taking the lead at the start . Hrown 

nity was established in 1879 «t M. A« immediately took second place fol- 

C. as a local society, and has been lowed by New York uiii\ei-.n\ 

activelv connected with college activi- Manhattan and M AC fought for 

ties since that time. The following fourth place until the last lap w hen 

men loin.de.H V < . . A . W . Spaiild- the t..rmi-r dropped out. Fordham 

ing '81, IF K. < apin'Hl. F. P. Hing- held the pMM) throughout and finished 

ham '*•_>. C. IF Damon '81, L. U. some tell yards ahead of Hrown. 



Tall '*'-'. F. s. Allen MS, F. A. 

Itisl.op US, II J. Wl.eele, . A. 

Ilowmitii Hi, F. S. Chandler '81 



The time M 

( lark started the race for M A I 
and slipped into fourth place at the 



(lamina Chapter of Alpha Sigma start. EM iau a |MM "ace. having 

l'hi was originally installed at it nip and tuck with the Manhattan 

Amherst college in I8M, but the runner. He handed «.v ei a small lead 

charter was later withdrawn. The to Smith w In. kept in adv MM ihi.mgh- 

locul chapte. ol Alpha Sigma l'hi waa I out. Kldridg.- followed smith 1ml 

11 this chapter letter, I .annua, lost the advantage given him 

■# Of this fad The chapter ami wa» hard pressed throughout 

■ v s 



SKCONII HALF. 

The Aggie team gave decided cvi- 
i. nee of the "come back" spirit in 
the second half. Archibald, who 
played 1 consistent game during the 
half, injured his ankle ami was 
replaced by Little. Dartmouth's 
goal was constantly in danger during 
the entire half and it was due mainly 
to the excellent work of Donahue, 
dnir goal tender, that they were mil 
red upon more heavily. Jones 
and Hutchinson were all over the 
rink and were ably backed Dp by the 
of the maroon team. Ilutehin- 
n succeeded in evading the ever- 
hful Wanamaker and ran up two 
a points in M. A. C.'s favor 
M. received I bad rap on the nose 
>ith a stick and this seemed to put I 
op to the luck which favored us. 
bough Dartmouth was easilv held 
ning the remainder of the game, 
M. A. C. was unable to MOM any 
: t her points. Score: M. A. C. .'I, 

tmoiltli •">. 
special mention should be made 
the good work of Captain Hutch- 
11. Although he played at two 

(Continued on page i\ 



■ l" \ _ » . s ., - . . • 

Alpha— Yale uuiveisi; 

Btta Hai vaid university 

(lamina — Mass. Agricultural college 

Delta -.Marietta collet 

/.eta < >hio Stale university. 

Fta Fnivcrsitv of Illitio 

I'heta I niversity of Michigan. 

Iota — Cornell university. 

Kappa I uiveisiu of Wisconsin. 

Fambda —Columbia university. 

M11 I 'niversity <>f Wasniugtoii. 

Nu— Fnivcrsin of Califomie 



• I 

the tine. Illlilicls succeeded III (Ufl 

taming the N. w York uuiveisitv 
learn. ( apt. Whitney relieved Fhl 
. with Manhattan's fourth man 
slightly in the had. With a beauti- 
ful spurt Whitney 1 ► - • — ■ < Manhattan 
and closed in rapidlv upon N. i 1 I ■ 
The latter, however, had MO gNat a 
lead to be ..V. ■l.'iilili' and the tape WiU 

1 with M. I I tcm 

valds behind New Y<>i k iniiv. 1 

iring fourth place. Manhattan. 



Following are a few of the "' !»•- '••-» »»«■ 1 had «l.o |M .ed out. 

mil ,, nt a | lim „i of I 14 number- giving M. A. ( . the pnv .lege of being 

f the most piommeu. men tin las. to linish. Fordham won 

of the country. Hun. A. Ulakeslee -asily, with Urown. N. ^ I and M. 

Whit.. I of West Virginia; A. <• linishing in the orde, named. 



Hon. Simon F. Ualdwin. t.ov. of 
Connecticut ; the late (ieti. Stuarl 



M . A. ( !.*■ time was •'. : IS. 
D. S. Caldwell, ev-'l:;. 



now at 



Wo.Hlfo,,l Fx-Fieut. QW. Of »e« OoMeU, repiesellted the llosto,, A. 

rotfc Minis,., to Spain W. S. Dis- A. in the I -yard handicap. (aM- 

trial attornev: Fx-.lus.ice shiras. W. well was penali/.ed M yards behui.l 



S. Supreme Court ; Hon. Andrew D 
White. Fl.. D., F- H. D., Ph. D.. 



s.iat<h due to late entrance. In tin 
trial heat, he tiiiishe.l a ch.~. laOODd, 



DC] (Oxford) Aral Plm ef Otor- »rt the finals prared to much for h.m 

I1( .|| universi.v. „,.ni-tcr to b«.ss,a. and. af.c, running an excellent ,:,.,, 

a,,,!,, |,„ to(ierma„y;Dr. F. K. nossed the tape behind three othei 

\Vo,,l,iu-| 1 .„, ) |li«-erofi;A.-ade 1 „iede >' '■>• >> >''• WW, W MitaMd 

France; Hon w,„. Crapo, c.-ngress- this race bat oa sccoaal of an unfa., 

ln .„, Cyras Northrop. l.F. D.Fx- aaadteap was fond to retire bafore 

Prae Ualraraltr of Miaaaaota j Oea. ooveriag the Ulataace. 



Win. (lordon. Confe-lerate army, 
railroad president : Win. Suinner. I'll. 

D.. EL. D. Vale Profeaaof ; Boa. 

Win M. Stuart. F S. Senator; Hon. 
Charles IF Flint. ' Justice 



A new record was set for the 
indoor mile run by Abel Kiviat of 
the Irish-American A. C Kiviat 
made the distance in 4:18-1. 
Another exciting run was the two 



. If Pl.illii.ines • Col II mile rehiv between Dartmouth, Har- 
Supreine court oi I hiinpines , » 01. it- , 

, Continue on P*c« 2, fCantlhued »n p«e «J 



FOUR GOALS FOR YALE 

In Hockey Game at New Haven. 
Brewer Plays a Fine Game. 

The Massachusetts hockey team 

waa defeated bj the fast Yale ikatere, 

on the ^ ale rink at New Haven on 
Salinday afternoon, by a l-H set ire. 
(Iwiuu to the warm weather, the 
ice was rather soft, making consist- 
ent team work difficult, Mild slowing 
down the game pel ctptibly. M.A.C. 

proved stnniger t>u uffenae than 

defense but they were outplayed ill 
cvciv depaitiiieut of the game. 
Neither team was able to work the 
passing game very eil.-clivclv. 
Hutchinson and .b.nes broke through 
the Held many times, only to be 
ellectlially boxed ill by the watchful 
Yaje defense l.efore thev could gel a 
g.Ksl thOt at the cage t l.ii goal was 
bombarded ciistantlv will. long 
,|,..ts. and ii must have DOM 

much largei had it not been for the 
brilliant w<nk of Iti.wer. to whom 

M stops were credited. 

Altholl-h M. A « tailed to seoie. 
the team played a last RggH BalM 
game, and the rill>bei was UlUch ol 
the time in the middle of the rink 01 

in Yale's territory. M"st of Yah 

I 
tanee. mm! arew aaallj stopped. 

Scriniiiiag.s m liont "I the goal were 

not fre.pi. ut. Vale was most often 

. |..i|s when her lol wards .allied 

the puck behind the goal, in attempts 
to ■tore an assist. 

The lirst tally was made by Cox. 
fioin a scrimmage in front of 0111 
|0ai. it was seemed after 1H uiin- 
Of the haidest kind of playing 

I wooih.i seorM bj Baroa and (k» 

m.eh on long shots from tin- 
side in quick sue cession. Steadying 
down, howev.i. th< men cai - 

lied the pmk nil" 'I ale territory 
and prevented further scoring in the 

l!is| |„ iio.1. Iliewel made ten stop- 
foi M. A ( . and Schuller of Yale 
,„ade I. The half ended with the 
score :;-M in Yale's fav-i . 

The second period was hotly coll- 
d throughout. Our forwaid- 

a little mole ag-|essive. 'I'h.y 
broke through for lour shots at the 
cage, all of which, however, w 
effectually blo.ked. Ilie olllv tallv 
came to V ah- aller 19 minutes of 
plav when Macdoiiald sna|»|.ed the 
puck in from I s.-i iinmage in front of 
the cage. Brewer made 1<» stops i;i 
this period. Score at end of game 
J-o 

( ..x and tferoa did splendid work 
for Yale, their exhibition of skat- 
ing and stick work being superior 
ta any other in the game. 
P,i ewer at goal starred for M. A. ( . 
i while Captain Hutchinson and .buns 















1 <1 H 

I 



I 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 18, 1913. 



were always Strong <>n the offensive, 
keeping their opponents busy, 

throughout lbs game. 

The line-up : 



YAM 

Schiller, g 
Martin, p 
Core, cp 
Harman, r 
Cox, c 
Heron, Iw 
M.h clonal'!, rw 

s ore— Yale 4, M 
Cox 2, Heron, Macdonald. Stops- 
Brewer 20, Schiller 6. Referee — Chaun- 
cey of Yale. Umpires— Chapman and 
Daniels. Timers— Mallett and Ulacke- 
ley. lime— 20 -minute halves. 1'enalties 
— Harmon for tripping, j min. 



M. A. C. 

g, Brewer 

p, Little 

cp, Needham, Fernald 

r, Hutchinson 

c, Jones 

Iw, Johnson 

rw, Christholm 

. C. o. Goals — 



C. S. C. NOW A NATIONAL 

[Continued from first pagej 

I). BpragJM Ph. I)., former Pres. of 

I 'Diversity of North l>akot:i : Hod. 
Alfred IleiiiDieDway. 1'ies. Mass. Itur 
\--1niatioi1, K. T (Jalloway. Pies 
.Merehaiit's Nat. of New York ; Pro- 

reasof Win. II. Bagjs, Prat* Cornell 

Board of Trustees. 

A few of the graduates of C. S. C. 
who have attained prominence are : 
Pita. W. K. Stone of Purdue unisei- 
-itv ; Dr. K A. Allen. viee-«lire< tor 
of I. B KxperinieDt Stations ; I > 1 . 
.loci (Joldthwaite, eininent surgeon; 

Dr. Liadaay, Goasoaoa Pwsf saaor of 

Chemistry at M. A. (.; Dr. Kelt, 
chief entomologist of N. Y. Stale ; 
C. W. V. Felt, vice-president A. T. 
.V S. K. It. R. 



TRACK TEAM 

|< untiniird fmtn paRc I J 



vard SBd (01 Dell. The Ithaea dele- 
gating, included John Paul .loins, 
who ran ■ wonderful race against 
Dartiiioiill). The green team had 
gained shell a lead at the start that 
the plucky Cornelliau was nnalile to 
overcome it ami crossed the red yarn 
in secoiKl place. 

The events were as follows : 
6(r-yard dash (handicap) — Won ley 
A. Woolls, Laughlin I.vceiiiii ; 2nd 

I). P. Parry, St. Bartholomew's; M 

S. A. Shapiro. Y. M. C. A. Time 
I.I sees. 

IO0O*yard run (handicap) — Won 
by It. V. La Barron. I'nion college; 
tad, K. T. Marceau, B. A. A. 
Time 2:17-1. 

One mile National Guard relay 
(handicap) — Won hy 71st Reg.; 
"2nd, 2nd Battalion Naval Militia; 
3rd, ttad Reg. Time, 3-29. 

One mile Intercollegiate relay 
(scratch) Class B — Won hy Fordham 
university : 2nd, Brown university ; 
•h-d. New York university ; 4th, M. 
A. C. Time. 3:38-2. 

One mile Columbia Interclass relay 
— Won l>y junior class ; 2nd, senior 
class ; 3rd, freshman class. Five 
men per team. Time, 3 :30. 

f.OO-yard run (novice) — Won by 
; 2nd, F. Sweeney, Pas- 
time A. C. Time, 1 :25-2. 

Two mile Intercollegiate champion- 
ship relay — Won by Dartmouth ; 2ud, 
Cornell ; 8rd, Harvard. Time, 8 :4-2. 



One mile athletic club relay (handi- 
cap)— Won by New York A. C. ; 
2nd, Irish- American A. C. ; 3rd, 
Knights ^of St. Anthony. Time, 
3:27-1. 

One mile Intercollegiate champion- 
ship relay — Won !>y Columbia uni- 
versity ; 2nd, Harvard ; .'.id. I'niver- 
sity of Pennsylvania. Time, 1:81. 

One mile run, Second Baxter Cup 
—Won by Abel Kiviat, Irish-Ameri- 
can A. C. Time, 4:16-1. 

Five mile run (handicap) — Won 
by G. Strobino, South A. C.Paterson 
Time. 2<» min. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 18, 1913. 






DARTMOUTH WINS AGAIN 

[Continued from page I] 

different positions during the course 
of the game, he displayed veteran 
ability at either and covered his man 
at all times. His exceptional goal 
shooting prevented a much more 
serious defeat, .bmes played a strong 
consistent game throughout and clev- 
erly assisted Hutchinson whenever 
possible. He showed great ability 
by covering every member of the 
Dartmouth team including his own 
particular opponent. Brewer at goal 
made some clever stops and played 
consistently from start to finish. 

F01 -Dartmouth, Wanamakei, Tuck 
ami Donahue starred. The first 
named is a wonderful rover and Ml 
work rivalled that displayed by him 
on the M A. C. rink. 

Although this makes Dartmouth's 
sec.ind victory over M. A. C this 
year, there is still much doubt in the 
minds of the Maroon and White sup- 
porters us to the supremacy of the 
two team-. Even referees are 
known to be partial at times. 

The line-up : 
M. A. 1 . DARTMOUTH 

("hisholm. Fernald, rw rw, Mason 

Jones. Capt. Hutchinson, c c, Tuck 

(apt. Hutchinson. Jones, r Wanamaker 
Johnson, Iw Iw, Frost, Livermore 

Archibald, Little, p p, Dellinger 

Needham, cp cp. Johnson 

Hrewer, g g, Donahue 

Summary— M. A. C. 3, Dartmouth 5. 
(ioals-For M. A. C, Hutchinson a, 
Jones 1 ; f or Dartmouth. Dellinger 1, 
Tuck I, Warnamaker 2, Frost 1. Ref- 
eree— Luitweiler. Time— 20 minute 
halves. 



RIFLE 


TEAM 


[ 




Results of M. A. 


C.-Clemson 


rifle 


match, Aggie '.).'»; 


i-Clemson <> 


(by 


default). 








Standing. 


Prone. 


Total. 


K. W. Dunbar, 


95 


lOO 


•95 


A. F. Kdminster, 


94 


lOO 


•94 


K. S. Clark, 


93 


IOO 


•93 


M. Headle, 


9« 


98 


189 


J. T. Oertel, 


89 


99 


188 


K. S. Weatherbee, 


89 


99 


188 


C. V. Hyde, 


89 


98 


•87 


W. C. Forbush. 


85 


97 


182 


F. D. Criggs, 


85 


97 


182 


Neal, 


82 


9' 


•73 


Total for first five, 


959 






Total for second five, 


912 






Team total, 


1871 







CLOSING OUT SALE ! 

Skates and Skating Shoes 



$4 50 Skates, - 

$3.00 Skates, - 

$2.00 Skates, - 

$3.50 Shoes, - 

$3.00 Shoes, - 



Now $3.50 
Now $2.25 
Now $1.50 
Now $2.85 
Now $2.20 



Page's Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE HANKS 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 




Che 
Pheasant 

Bmiti? St., 
Bmbcrat 



Telephone 470 



BREAKFAST 

IUNCHION 
AFTERNOON TEA 

1 'inner if arranged for. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
...Diamond Merchants 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPEOI AL11TS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.*. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, M 

Office Hours: 
DtoiaA.M. i.aot.ini'.M. 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

Keiis<ini><>>f wiii.". 

Alt-***. ai.j>1£:v 

House Next to Laundry. 



Fill t Winter Soils 4 overcoats 

New line of samples just received 
Made to Order ft Ready to Wear Suit* 

Latest Styles 

inMackmaws 



PIERCE, BILLINGS & CO., Boston, Miss. 

H B WHITE 'IS, Afent 
10 Allen Street 



HAVE YOU A COLD ? 

Whiil At-*? Yon Dolls** For It *? 



Murray '13 addressed the Land- 
scape Art club Thursday evening on 
"Insects and Insecticide*." 



Don't neglect a cold, for neglect means needless worry and the probable 
development of serious conditions that are not so easily overcome. <<>'»< 
and get a box of our 

EEXALL COLD TABT.rTTS 

Price a« Centa 

A complete relief that is quick and positive is enjoyed after a few Rexall 
Cold Tablets have been taken. It is a mighty wise policy to get a box and 
keep it in the house, so that you can nip a cold in the bud. 



Henry Adams & Co 

The RGXALL Store o«* tt»e> com^ s 



Angier '13 



Tar bell '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY TOMIC 



KUi ridge '14 



Kt-ndall 16 



INTERCLASS GAMES 

The first two games of the I ntat 
class basketball serifs were played in 
the drill hall Thursday evening, at 
which time the seniors de fe a te d the 
sophomores 22-7, and the juniors 
defeated the Freshmen 36-1.'$ in two 
very fast games. In both mhj the 
final periods were hotly contested. 

The soplioiiioiv senior g:une was 
played first and the Mfjien quickly 
demonstrated that they could "come 

beet 

The line-up : 

SKNIOKS. 

Covill, rf 
Huntington, If 
Griggs, c 
Ei&enhaure, rl> 
("iore, lb 



SOPHOMORES. 

rb, Melican 

lb, Little 

c. Dole 

If, Masse, Smith 

rf, Frost 

Goals— Covill, Huntington 3. Griggs 5. 
GerCtMaaat, hole. Fouls— Huntington, 
("mill. If MM 2. Smith. Kefree-Hi>Ws 

The first half of the j 11 11 ior- fresh- 
men game showed a score of M to •». 
The second half was hot and rough, 
and looked more like football than 
basketball. Smith and lladlield star- 
red for the juniors and la'hmnu mid 
Darling played well for 1!U6. 

The line-up I 

JUNIOKS FKESHMKN 

Smilh, If rb, Moses, Darling 

Kdgerton, rf lb, Reed, Colburn 

HlltJllll, Hetfron, c c, Hall, King 

lower, Davies, lb rf, Lehman 

Hrewrr, Christie, rb If, Keegan 

< ,oals— Smith 9, Hadfidd 5. Edgerton 
3, Hrewer. Moses, Darling. Keegan 3, 
Keed KouU H.ultield. Smith, Lehman 
5. Keferee— Huntington. 




J " Iiod, they say, 
c arithmetic of 
succt:,:. 

Don't choose your 
tobacco haphazard 
— be a successful 
smoker. 





TMB 
SMOOTHEST 
TOBACCO 



multiplies your 
I leisures and adds to 
>.;ur friends. It is 
t mptingly rich and 
s ttirfying— the choic- 
e t growth of Burley 
leaf from which has 
been subtracted every 
trace of bite and burn. 

eQyaZT^Ty*** * ^t 111 & 



SWEATERS 

and 

MACKINAWS 




The Fall season is the Sweater time of die year. The Football 
games call for Mackinaw* and Sweaters. We are ■bowing the 
best styles of the best makers. No fancy prices «u this store. 

Mackinaws $5, $5.50. $6, $6 50 and $7 
Sweaters in all the popular colors $1 to $6.50 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College Photographers . ♦ • 



LOCALLY: 5 a Center St., Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

Main Orrur. I These Studios ofler the (.est skilled 

1546-1 548 Hroadway, atttHi -mrl most ratRffctC 

New York < Hv equipment obtainable 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrics. 



I'M .en lilt* it~4 *mo 

rmiWTA!M DPN UP 



-"^FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen ^^ 

troubles by ownlnft a Moore's, ft It is the yp 



^ iruuuics wjj vtt»«bssbs •• • — - -- 

safest, soundest and most depcndaMo pcnknnm 
ft Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to ftet out of order, ft You can ft ve your- 
self no better treat than a Moore s Non-leakable. 

For Sale by Dealer* Everywhere 

American Founfaln Pen Company J 

Adam*, (u.hlnft A Foster. Selling Aftenla c r- 

168 DEVONSHIRE STRIiKT IIOSTON. MASS ^a. 



% 



,\JJ- 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 18, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 18, 1913. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

R. H.VANZW U.I NIU l<<; 'i ;.l diti.r in Chief 
C 1 1 KS T I". R I'.W 1 1 I' E I . I K U M :in.iiiinKKiiitor 
OSCARG. ANDSRSOM'it A distant Kdit..i 
FREDERICK D.GRIGGS '13. Athletic Kdit.-r 
s MI1.L.BR JORDAN 'i% AlfchtJc Editor 
HARRY W. ALLEN '1* thuMJ Editor 

B 1 r\KT ». POSTER 'u. C mhmm Editor 

ERVINI 1 rARKER'14, viumm Editei 

HAROLD C. OLAl K 'm. I >►•(>.>. tnient Kditcr 
J. AI.BKK I I'HK I \^..ciate RdJtOt 

QEORGE B. DONNEU v iMndftfe BUSm 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

CKORGK ZANRISKIE id.'i3. Ruv Matuijpr 
ERNEST S.C1 AH KIR 'u ht» 9m Mamiger 
ERNEST W.\ I'H'N'u. Asst.Adv MUHRM 
MAl'RK ! I' I <" OH '<-,. Ciroil.ttmn 



possibly be offered to show the 
beauties of this most wonderful val- 
ley in its spring coloring. Looking 
at the Blatter from ;i purely liierrni- 
ary standpoint, it is evident that the 
• l piom" cannot he a success unless 
it is S .///"""'"/ suet-ess. T<» accom- 
plish this, it i> very necessary that m 
large nuinher of the fellows decide t<> 
go. There is plenty of time to save 
the money in the two months before 
the event QQOSM oil, so • > a»k that 
girl," and help to make this year's 
'■prom" the best one ever held at 
Massaggic. 



Subscription $1 50 per ve»r Sngle 
copies 5 cents. MaV<« all orders payable tc 
George Zabriskie ?nd. 

Fnterad a* Mcond-f'a** matter it tha Amlwrr 
Po* OfHc» 

Vol. XXIII. Ti-knoay. I I i is. No. iS 



This issue in charge of Chester E. 
Wheeler 1014. 



Tiivi ".Wgie'" is greatly in favor 
with the Hellenic world, i* evidenced 
D1 tRO app«'arriiice of the campus of 
the sixth national fraternity, and the 
fourth to be installed within a 
and a half. C S. ( '.. the fourth old- 
•OOietJ in college, has given place 
|0 the t lamina Chapter of Alpha 
Sigma Phi. We heartily erelooRM 
the newcomer. The Alpha Sigma 
l'hi Fraternity is to he eonOjraV 
ulated on this addition to its 
chapter roll, of a SOOtStjr, which 

through the years, baetanssd out men 

who have made their |»la<e in the 
world, and of whom the names are 
synonymous with success. This flour- 
ishing C'htlptel i> sine to Uphold the 
traditions of its use alliliation. and 
. ver onward and upward, hringing 
gtorj hoth to Alpha Signs Phi, and 
the Maroon and Wbiti 



Another metamorphosis in our 
midst. The "Shakes," we suppose. 
will henceforth he known as "Alpha 

Sigs." 

Oscar (1 Anderson and Harold B. 
Hurshv of the senior class have ac- 
cepted election to Kappa Beta l'hi, 
the senior society. 

Sophomores and others are forced 
to put their hard-earned Physics into 
practice while navigating the hoard- 
walk SBfOSS the ravine. 

B. 0. Georgia, " recent graduate 
of Cornell, took charge of the work 
in market gardening on the depart- 
ure of Prof. P. L Yeaw. 



Have Your Shoes Repaired Willi 



OUR SPECIAL 



It is very notieeahle that the nuin- 
her of regular hoarders at the dining 
hall has fallen off considerahly since 
the new registration hegan, douhllos 
due to the requiring of hoard money 
for four troekl in advance. At >u<-li 
a time, a large amount of money SRI 
to BR paid out for laboratory t 
l>ooks. and other supplies and to 
bare an extra amount of capital tied 
up for a few weeks in prospective 
hoard, causes many fellows to less 
to join the "bread-line." Why 
.should a man at this particular season, 
he positively required to pay for four 
weeks in advance, when at all other 
times he may pay a week ahead, just 
to date, or even fall a little behind t 
Is it fair to make a man tie up so 
much mone\ on "futures. " when his 
expenses at this time of the year are 
over-large already? Let us have a 
reasonable agreement in regard to 
this matter of advance board money, 
so that a man will not he obliged to 
stop eating or -.ubsist at a luncli 
counter hecause his appropriation 
for this month has run out. for 
expenses accruing from the work in 
his studies. 



Wear-proof Sole Lea nei 



Costs you no more than the ordinary 
kind — will wear nearly twice as loag. 



Prompt Service Strictly 
First-class Work. 



•• • • 



Tin students' boycott of the local 

moving-picture theater i- >me to he 
misinterpietted by some. It is not a 
ie head*' measure, I. ut an attempt 
to prove to the management — which 
jumped to conclusion-, too soon — that 
distill hatiees at the ••movies" were 
not due to the students from M. A. 
( '. With the cause of tin- annoyances 
still uiiiem-'Ved, and in the absence of 
men from this college, the manage- 
ment will have to admit that it was 
wrong in its conclusions. If hy any 
chance disturbance-, are caused by 
short-course men the Student body of 
M. A. C. cannot be held accountable. 
That is ••another department." 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

[KflttoMfef Mil* column *houlrl h* dtnpped in 
OteSMNAI ( 'ttir^ or lundeit to MimiI II hotter 
14. on or irior* Saturday prectf dinu e;n h i*mi» 

i M M. A. ( .c. A . M£ v.*. 
Chapel. 

Feb. 23 — Sunday chapel. '.»-l"» \. M. 
Dr. IC II. Potter of 
Hartford. COM. 
26— Assembly. l-.">0 v. \t. 
T. B. Hvrnes. N 
N. II • II. K. R. 



Pel. 



Mr 
V. 



Now that the .lunioi "prom" is 
announced for the eighteenth of 
April, those students who have not 
intended tO go heretofore should 
make a decision to "lake it in" upon 
that date At that time of the year. 

the campus will be roost attractive, 

and no better opportunity could 



CAMPUS NOTES 

So near and yet so far — Smith 
college. 

'Twas erer thus — an ideal "Prom" 
week without the ••Prom." 

Tea Delta Who held an initiation 
banquet in Northampton on Wednes- 
day . 

Boeiaese in the librarr is picking 

up: "Aggie Industry" has com- 
menced. 

Rather late for snow shoe dubs. 

It's nearly time for marbles and 
••pit( bin' pennies 

The bulletins from Smith and Mt. 
Holyoke have been like insult added 
to injury. What good is it to know 
about reopen when there is I ban 
on Amherst callers? 



NORTH [UPTON 2 



Academy 
Music. 



WB8K OF FEBRUARY 17 



Tin; Nonnampton Players 



IN 



Forty-live Minutes Fiom Broadway 

EVERY EVENINU AT 8.00 
Price* 28c. 50c «ml 7Sc 



Wed. and Sat. Mats, at 2:15 

Price* 2ftc »nd SOc 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



Coolep's f>otel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Sm 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 




•\TfXT T CAN WRITE PHOTO PLAYS AND 
lUU EARN $25.00 OR MORE WEEKLY 

We Will Show You How ! 

If you have ideas— if you can think— we will show you the secrets 
of this fas( mating new profession. Positively no experience or literary 
excellence necessaiv. No " flowery language" is wanted. 

The demand for photo plavs is practically unlimited. The big lilm 
manufacturers are ■• moving heaven and earth " in their attempts to get 
enough good plots to supply the ever increasing demand. They are 
offering $100 and more, for single scenarios, or written id< 

We have received many letters from the film manufacturers, such as 
VITACRAI'H EDISON, ESS A NAY, LUBIN. soLAX. IMP, RKX, 
RELIANCE CHAMPION, COMET, MKLIKS, FTC. urging us to 
send photo plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach 
you the secrets' of success. 

We are selling photo plays written by people who "never 
before wrote a line for publication." 

Perbapa we can do the same for you. If you can think of only one 
good idea every week, and will write it out as directed by us, and it 
sells for only $25. a low figure. 

You Will Earn $100 Monthly For Spare Time WorK. 

MRS ml SEND YOUR NAME AMD ADDRESS AT ONCE FOR FREE COPY OF 
FKliili OUR ILLUSTRATED BOOK, " MOVINB PICTURE PLAYWRITIN6 " 

Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what tl 
new profession may mean for you and your future. 



NATIONAL AUTHORS 
INSTITUTE 



R-717, 1543 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



The underclass hockey teams are 
preparing for their game which will 
probably be pulled off when the 
Sophs feel in the right mood. 

The Mettewampe trek Wednesday 
afternoon developed into an endur- 
ance contest It resemhled the 
Desert Of Sahara in a sandstorm for 
the most part. 

During the rainy spells this fall 
and winter many patrons of the Post 
(Mice in "North" have said hail 
things obottt the puddle of water and 
ice that collects on the brick-work in 
front of tin- east doorway. A little 
time occupied in resetting the bricks 
would be well spent and much 
appreciated. 

GYM. N0TICK 

Prom February until April, the 
hours for indoor gymnasium work — 
bosket ball — will he the last two 
hours, each morning, ami the last 
two hours each afternoon on Monday. 
Tuesdav, Thursday and Pridav. < hi 

» •■ * 

W.-.lncsd.iv. the last two hours in the 
morning and the last three hours in 
the afternoon may lie used for basket 
hall «oik. Men who by teasoii of 
accident, physical condition, or choice 
desire to take indian-elub work have 
the opportunity to do so the last 
BOOr in the morning and the second 
hour in the afternoon of each day. 

I here will be opportunity for a 
limited number of men who desire 
to work on the mats, parallel bars 
led other apparatus to do ho. This 
il 111 the charge of S. P. Huntington 
I'!. Credit will also be given those 
men who take track work between 
">-."»<» and .'i-.'H> t M. daily, who have 
their attendance recorded be the man 
in charge of the track work. The 
same applies to hoc-key when there is 
ice. 

Kach Wednesday afternoon after 
Assembly a trek will be offered for 
which two hours credit will be given. 
Kach Saturday, usually in the after- 
noon, a trek will be offered counting 
three hours credit for the following 
week. These Mettewampe treks 
will be in charge of men. to wli<>u: 
the credit cards must be turned in 
In event of there being sufficient 
-now, there will be a Winter's Sports 
club organized. Snowshoeing and 
skiing, when done under supervision 
"f the department will be given the 
- une credit as treks. 

Only four and one-half cuts will 

allowed in Physical Pducation. 

Men taking more than this number 

will be considered as overeat in the 

course. Kach week's work is 0OR> 

red as a unit and no make-up 

"ik for past weeks will be per- 

<e<l. A word to the wise 

1' keeping up their attendance. 

Ject to do so may make unne< - 

irv trouble for the delinquents in 

••one. 



BIBLE STUDY CLASS 

Italph J. Watts met several mem- 
bers of his class in Studies in the 1 
Life of Christ after chapel last Sun- 
day, and arranged with them for the 
opening of the class next week. Por 
the present the men will meet directly 
after Sunday chapel in Hooin (J, South 
College. The classes will be held for 
about an hour each Sunday until 
some time in May. Mr. Watts 
desires to hold informal talks and 
discussions on the life of Christ as 
outlined in the schedule j»i\en below. 
The men will be asked to spend a 
certain amount of time in preparation 
for the work as the success of the 
cla-s depends the interest taken in 
it be its members. Twelve topics 
bare been announced, and each Sun- 
day a OOpe of the references and 
points of discussion for the next 
week will be given out. The fust 
paper may now be obtained from Mr. 
Watts or from those men who OTTO 
present Sunday, to whom extra copies 
were ijiven. A class of about I- 
nicn is desired, as this number is best 
for a good, helpful discussion of the 
topic. In the past two years these 
classes have been held with gnat 
benefit to the memlieis, and it i- to 
be hoped that even more can be 
done thU \eai Mr. Watts sloO 

desires those who have signed the 
cards distributed last Wednesday to 
hand them to him 01 to Kdwaids 'II 
as soon as possible so that the size 
of the class and the somber of papers 
to be prepared will be known. 

TIM outline of the Itible study 
class follows : 

1. Itirth, Childhood, and Youth of 

Carta 

I. The Ministry of John the 
liapti-t 

:5. The Itaptism and Temptation. 

Discourses with Individuals. 

The Apostles. 

The Sermon on the Mount. 

The Parables of Christ. 

The Miracles of Christ. 

The Transfiguration. 

Passion Week. 

heath, Crucifixion and llurial. 

IC snrrection and Suhseipient 
Appearances. 



"7. — John J- Summers has been 
ed in immediate supervision of 
work on parasites at the gipsy 

>th laboratory. Melrose Highlands. 



» 

6, 

7. 

x. 

I, 
10. 
11. 
II. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Wh-rxis, It has pleased Almighty 
God Hi His infinite wisdom to take 
unto Himself our beloved friend and 
classmate. Thomas Vincent Cannon, 
therefore be it 

ffoiMlfwuf, that the members of the 
M. A. C. Catholic club do extend to 
his family our sincercst -\111pathy. in 
this, (Refer hour of trricf. and be it 
further 

flmrfrnf) That ■ requiem High 
Mass be celebrated for him in St. 
Bridget's church Feb. I!', lilt, and 

be it farther 

BssOfveet, that I copy of these 
resolutions he sent to the bereaved 
family, that a copy be inscribed on 
the records of our club and that a 
copy be published in Tiik Coi.i.kok 

SlUKAL. 



John L. Mayer 



) 



Leliov P. Prouty. J 



For the Club. 



F»IIT A "HOT ONE 

OVER 'rill£ PLATE 1 * 

EVI.KY If, A. C. m.«» will admit dial the final test of the quality of a potato 
is when it is placed 00 the table— when you put a " hot one " over the plate, 
one bet bom ihe uvea along with a juic> steak or mashed with a counuy 
sausage, or even plain boiled with codfish and cie.un (COBUrioioS ."t le.ist a sus- 
picion of creami. After testing such a potato, one can well subscribe to the toast : 

•The Irishman; God bless him for 
persisting in existing - on the potato " 

l>> so doing he has directed the attention of humanity to the gastiouomic 
virtues of the solatium fuofr,>\uw, native ol SotttB America, but popularly 
known as the " Irish " potato. 

And What Is It? When a farmer sells a bushel of perfect potatoes 
wei^lnnn 00 lbs., he delivers 48 Ihe, of water, 10 lbs ol 1 PSdsSStd sun- 
shine in the shape of March and two lbs. of mineral which is ol the 
the earth e >rthy, and yet it hi within 0140% ROWS! l<> so inllurncr the 
relation or arrangement of the water, the Starch owl the minerals in 
the tuber by breeding of seed, by cultivation, fertilization and spray- 
ing, as to produce with almost absolute certainty, in normal seasons, a 
toothsome, wholesome vegetable the delight of every man's table 

u> WHA I </<• yon know itbonl that 
Has the Fertilizer ,iny thing to 1/0 with it 
s Tl P V the I'lant I'oo.l I'ronlem f 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St.. Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD. 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimcrs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING k SPECIALTY 




TEIST TO ONE 

That the particularly SMART HAT 
you saw yesterday was a C & K. 



AMF*IOJV, «ole- Atii-iil, 



OVERCOATS 

We made a hundred this season. Ask the other fellow how he liked his. 

DRESS SUITS 

We make them all and make them right at 




MPIO^ T ' 

College Stores, 



i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February iS, 1913 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 18, 1913. 



The.Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobber-* at Wrought Iroa and Br Ma Pipe, Valve* 

and Kittings !<>' Meani. Water ami (ia-. I sln-stos 

and Magnesu It«n l*-r aad Pipe < overinga, HI pa 

Cut to Sketch. Mill Supoliea. Engil eeri and Of Boston l» BuyUton St. 

Contractors for Steam .mil 1 1 « » t Watei H rat lag, 

conne n c t!ons pnnklerSyste,, ' s ' *n2L£&?Slml?. ; Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



T* Teachers Exchange 



C&rp*rvter fit Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Mai 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash Bloch, Amherst 



H. M. Ko<;ers, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St.. 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



$750.00 Sterling Silver Cup 
tor 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 

1912 
WON SY 

The £. L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. Me. 

f\NK of the largest and most 
^"^ reliable sce«l potato houses 
in the Uifitrd States, Competi- 
tion ■pea to the entire United 
States ami Canada. Messrs. K. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize ior Best County Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00. I 
The K. L. Cleveland Company use 

E. FRANK C0E 



FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
beetl the business farmer's favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

In «ii*hi M 1 Mil • / hf Sf..ry t.f I l'r,fil,ihli' 1'itlilt" 
<rtif>'' * ,-l...... Ii. mi * i Mi»*i«t'»lt luiii.l*. M.Im. firwrr 

t M ..mi In-, in ri-i|ii-.t 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



SI CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Tr* 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Prof. Carry S. Hicks will address j 
tlif Christian Association meeting at, 
8-4fi next Thursday evening. When 
students attend these meetings they 
Hi id that the brief time required is 
well spent. The pressure for time 
which football and some other activ- 
ities exact is not as great at this 
time of the year. The Christian 
Association meeting needs your sup- 
port and in turn offers informal talks 
worth thinking about. 

Prof. Robert Sprague has con- 
sented to take a meeting, and it is 
expected that Prof. George Affleck 
of Springfield Y. M. C. A. college 
will give a talk on sex hygieue. Fur- 
ther notice will appear in the Sn.s u . 

FRESHMAN BANQUET RULES. 

1. The banquet season shall be 
from the first Wednesday in Msj at 
H a. m. to the second M0ml.1v there- 
after, inclusive. 

2. A sealed list of the freshman 
otiei officers shall bl placed in the 
hands of the president of the Senate 
before April F.», said list to be opened 
after fhe banquet. 

:i. There shall be no breach of 
peace by either class ; breach of 
peace being anything punishable in 
the eyes of the law. 

I. The banquet reserve shall be 
hounded as follows : west. Connecti- 
cut river ; north. Fitchburg division 
of Itoston & Maine railroad; east. 
Central Vermont railroad; south. 
Central Massachusetts division of 
the Boston ft Maine railraod. 

i. No freshman class officer shall 
voluntarily leave the reserve during 
the banquet season until M hours 
before the banquet. 

i'i. No freshman shall be taken 
beyond the limits of the reservi 
Hostilities shall not commence until 
the banquet season opens. 

7. Infringement of any rule will 
constitute a victory for the other 
class. 

s. All freshman class officers 
must be in this rsasnrt it the begin- 
ning of the banquet season. The 
banquet shall not be held before the 
first Saturday in May after the first 
Wednesday. 

ST 

!>. Flection of freshman class 
officers shall be in open class meeting. 
All present at this meeting must 
know officers elected before leaving 
the meeting in which the ballot is 
|> Iron Ninety percent of the class 
must be at this meeting. 

10. The banquet shall not be I 
success if the sophomores succeed in 
detaining the class president or any 
three other oflicers including the 
chairman of the banquet committee 
an officer in this connection, or if 
50 percent of the freshman class is 
not present at the banquet. 

\S<). — Alvin L. Fowler, national 
bank examiner, is investigating the 
losses of the First national Lank of 
High Bridge, caused by the specula- 
tions of its missing cashier, Abram 
Beavers. 



CHARLES W. HOOKER DEAD 

A I'Ko.MINKM |o| m; KN ft iMOI.OO I> I 

look DBOKBK OF I'll. Ii. AT M. A. i 
Dr. Charles W Hooker, died in 
Porto Rico, quite recently, as a re- 
sult of an attack of appendicitis 
His body has been placed on hoard 
a steamer bound for New York, and 
will arrive at that city Thursday. 

It is with sincere sorrow that lii> 
many friends at college have learned 
of the death of Dr. Hooker, who sai 
bean considered as one of the most 
promising young entomologists of tin 
country. He was prepared for col- 
lege at the Amherst high school, grad- 
uated from Amherst college in 1906, 
from which he immediately entered 
upon graduate work in entomology at 
this institution, where he received the 
degree of Ph. 1). in 1909. Following 
this, he was engaged by the F. B. 
bureau of entomology for special in- 
igation in cranberry insects in 
Wisconsin where he remained f<n 
two years. He was then transferred 
to entomological work at Vienna. 
Va ; leaving there to become ento- 
mologist of the experiment station 
at Mayaguez. Porto Rico, where In 
was located at the time of his death 
lie had published a number of paper- 
and bis thesis, written for his doc- 
tor's degree bad only recently ap- 
p cued. 

Dr. Hooker leases a father and 
mother. Mr. and Mrs. Charles II. 
Hooker of Amherst, a brother. Win. 
A Ho«»kei. an \f . A. <\ alumnus aho 
is located at Washington. D. ('.. 
a sister. Miss Bessie Hooker Eh 
was in Amherst last summer, whin 
he whs married to Miss Fli/ahetli 
Wiles of this town. 



CREDIT IN BUSINESS DEPART- 
MENT 
1916. 

Sears. 86.00 

Rogers. 22.7 • 

1916. 

Huntington. 96.75 



Kendall. 



27. L'.'. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 
moiui. 1 1 rem? . 
The short course and junior I 
in Horticulture are to take a trip Hal 
latter part of this week to Boston 
and vicinity. Ofl the way to BostOS 
a stop will be made at Framingh am, 
where Butterwortlfs and Nicholson's 
greenhouses will lie visited. Tw« 
establishments in Waban will be in- 
spected after which the party "ill 
continue to Boston where the W 
flower market and different repi' - "' 
tative retail stores such as Pel 
Qsi win's. Zinn's, Boyle's, etc.. rill 
be gone through. The return nf 
will be made Saturday afterii""' 

LAM'-< SIT.. 

At the last meeting of the I 
scape Art club held last Th 
evening, J. Wilbur Murray I 
a very good talk on insect- iBfl 
insecticides. 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATOR 



Those who KNOW 
Buy the Oe Laval 



creamery men -Bacanat tliey .irp experts 
in the hand linn of cream and know by lonx 
experience that the De Laval skims CMMUB 
as! ami wears longest I hat is why qHI 
of the World's creame it-s use the 1 ir 
Lav*) ext lusively. 

liiperlenced Dairymen -The De I. aval 

is the universal favorite among big dan \ 
men 1 h--> know that no othei leparatCM 
..ill give them such satisfactory mi vice. 

Old De Laval Ueera— Whenever a man 

» lin has used an old model I le I 

- to purchase a later M v le machine he 
mv.iirably buys another t)e I. aval. 

Men Who Investigate- II.-l.iisc they 
liml a large majoutv of I>e I. aval Baa 
chines in use; that they aie used by the 
liest informed useisevety where : that iliev 
stand up best in use. ana that their users 
are better satisfied than users of other 
separator 



The De Laval Separator Co. 



IBS 167 Hmadwav. 
New Vork. 



29 K. MadtMin St.. 

Chicago. 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for us by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

Don't F*oi**x«_»t 

That we are carrying a good line of 

— Tobneoo 



BIRDSALL 13 



FARRER 15 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



Professor Holcomb is to be the 
speaker at the next meeting on Feb. 
2~>, when he will talk on rural lit- 
erature pertaining to landscape work. 

The students in landscape are 
planning for three illustrated lectures 
for flic near future. These are to be 
■long nature lines and each lecture is 
illustrated by H>(» colored slides. 
Thev will undoubtedly prove vcrv 
interesting. 

Landscape 6, a course in the his- 
tory and mechanics of architecture, 
is the newest course in the depart- 
ment. It is in charge of Mr. Harri- 
son and the work is taken up along 
interesting and practical lines. 

KM i.i Bl 

Another man bfSS been added to 
the stall of the poultry d« partment 
in the person off Mr. f.oodale, a 
irch biologist who is taking 
charge of the work in breeding. 
The work is along lines of heredity 
to determine the factors entering 
into brce<ling for egg production. 
It is hoped to determine certain fact-. 
regarding sexual inheritance as 
regards color inheritance, etc \ 
separate incubator cellar has been 
picparcd for this work. 

The correspondence course which 
started on Kelt. I has proved so 
popular that a limit will have to bs 
set shoi tlv. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The Connecticut Valley Alumni 
association will hold its annual re- 
union and banquet at the Worthy 
Hotel in Springfield on Friday. Feb. 
21., at ."•. r. M. 

•m."».— Dr. .loel K. (loldthwaite 
recently lectured to a large audience 
at ♦! Marlborough St., Boston. on "The 
Importance of Correct Position in 
Health." He s|H»ke under the aus- 
pices of the committee on public 
health educatiou among women of 
the American medical association and 
tin department of public health of 
the Women's municipal league of 
Boston. 

'.'•'. — Albert T. Burgess has re- 
ceived a promotion and is now in 
charge of the work at the gipsy 
moth laboratory at Melrose High- 
lands, where he was previously en- 
gaged as entomologist. 

»97.— Prof. ('. F. Palmer who is 
engaged as supervisor of agriculture 
in the schools of Los Angeles writes 
of the progress which this branch of 
education is making in the schools of 
that city. lb states that many 
vacant lots are being fenced, piped, 
plowed and fertilized and turned 
o\ ei for the use of this department. 
Mr. Palmer is much interested in tlie 
organization of his new work, and lie 
is also trying to meet some of the 
problems which confront every city 
school department, and help to solve 
them in a new way. He states that 
he is planning to start a teachers 
class in agriculture soon, for which 
45 have already enrolled. The 



work is beiug watched with interest 
all over California. 

'••I. — Raymond R. Riiyuioiith, 
formerly located at Tacoma, Wash, 
is now in Chicago, III. Address, 
1 109 Best Both ^iivet. 

'().'».— Frederick L. Yeaw is general 
manager of the Otttlt Ranch and 
Land Co., of Roswell, New Mexico, 
and not the ftlSfttl Ranch and Land 
Co., as reported in the issue of last 
week. 

'07. — Clifford Thompson wa- at 
college recently. 

'OM. — William F Turner, formerly 
entomologist at the Alabama Poly- 
technic institute, at Aulmrn, Ala., 
OSS accepted a position with the I . 
S. bureau of entomology. His work 
will lie the toting of insecticides 
and he is located near Washington, 
I). ( 

'It. — William C. Sanctuary is now 
at home in Amherst lie i-. planning 
to take up graduate work at OoUl 

Ex-' 12.— John F. Fiiincgan. M 
Towel street. .1 amaica Plain 



^ uktrks 



\rAlt*^ 

"Vrtr 




Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company. 



K-.TAtlI.IKHK ■■ IKICi 

Stkpiikn LaNI !•'<>!. <;i;i< 

M WI'KAIl'I'HIMI JKW KI.KM 

ISO BROADWAY, KTatW yowk 

OtATB ami OOti tra S O M 

I'lNS AND RXKOSI «* 

IHII.II. NII.VKR A!«l> IIMUN7.K ^IMHIS 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New l.n 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR KX TENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower pri< 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 

COX SONS 

— AMI) 

VININO 

4th Avenue. New Vork 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

BsM MstsHsli and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



*7 Main St., Masonic Rldg.. 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Ctcstd only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes sninea anil Poiisned 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
0|..ii Sunday Main St. 

On way to Past Office. 









1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 18, 1913 



PLAYING 



CARDS 




The Massachusetts AericulturalColleee 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the. following subjects: 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



Aiiiiu<r«i, rvi *••«». 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELKR asm OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (Juitar String 

AMUKK.lT, MA»8. 
Next to Post Office. 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For conplete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone vt~* 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

2 MK 

3 I-2C 

48c per doc 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, 11.50 a Suit 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



K m I'll J. Bohden, Agent. 7 North Cottage 
ti>WA*i> C. lOWAtDS, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Athletic Hoard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association., 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Xiucteeu Hundred Fourteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christiau Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stock bridge Club, 



Loose 



Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 



Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN ft DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



(ieorge H. Chapman, Secretary 

F. D. (iriggs, Piesident 

S. H. Freeborn, Manager 

L. Edgar Smith, Manager 

h. II. Cooper, Manager 

W. S. Little, Mauager 

C. Hokeluud, Manager 

j. w. T. insure. U ootil ar j 

Harold F. Jones, Manuger 

.1. 1). French, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. Rogers. Mauager 

L. (.;. Davies. President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

A. F. McDougnll, President 



(Oil 



Wriuht «Ss Oit 

Catalogues of 

l^ill vV Winter Qootfa 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address. Colkfc 
Mudrnts and Athletes who want the raal. supen.i 
articles lor the various sports should in-ist uix.n 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson Trade Mark 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 

'tandaid hi 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wright 1 Ditson Goods are the 
all spoits 

u.oi.iii .v UIT«ON 
1H Washington St., Boaton, Mass. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

(Julrkrtl M-nlvr, Isrut Work, U«»l PHsl 

All woik caielully done. Work called lor and 
delivered, i.rnts' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suits a specialty 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WH. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash BTk, Amherst. 



Tel. No. M*-* 



CARS 



Leave AOOIB COLLEGE for Hoi - 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
camations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till 11 o'clock KVEKV night 

(arm r Aniiiy *n«l l'len»i«nt Mrwli 



If yon want to be 

MOI.IO WITH I Hi GIKLS 

you must have your clothes preaaetl and cleaned 

ATEPSTEIN'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rates 



Pressing and Cleaning a specialty 

Most liberal ticket system In town 
i>i. aoa-n 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNI FORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa, 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

F:*tablishod in 1824 by Samuel Bowles 

Springfield Republican 

A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA l 

The Republican gives the best reports of 

Agricultural College and Amher-: 

news, also the best news 

of outdoor sports 

Dmily, $8. Sunday, p. Wuk V 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 25, 1913. 



No. 19 



RELAY TEAM VICTORY RIFLEMEN STILL AT IT 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 



In Its Race Against Rhode Island at 
Providence. Time, 2-50 

The relay team wound up its 

lot Saturday night by du ff tin g 

the team representing the Rhode 

Island §tete college at the fifth 

uiiiiial go aw «>f tin- Rhodi island 

armor? association at Providence in 
the time of 8 minutes and M se.ouds. 
llii- track was 17.". yards long and •* li 
runnel inn two laps. Mark, Baker, 
l.ldridge and Capt. Whitney ran in 
the order named, Whitney, as usual, 
running the fastest relay of the four, 
(lark toed the mark with Dodge 
for the first relay. The starting gun 
fooad (lark ■ trifle out of balance 
and Dodge sprang ahead, about a 
yard in the lead. Be maintained 
this lead for only three-<|iiai ters of u 
lap when (lark passed him on the 
approach to the third hank, Baker 

mi his relay ■gBJBll TebOf (R. !•) 
with a six-yard lead. The Blush- 
Marnier started in like u winner and 
passed Baker after half a lap. 
BakM stuck to his man like I burr 
m.l with only half I lap to go shot 

t him and into ■ Ill-yard had. 
With this advantage Fldridge I l f » 

relay ; his lead was never in doubt 

m.l be finished eight yaids ahead of 

Hawkins. Whitney was never in 

trouble with Coleman and finished the 

with I nine-yard had. 

The times of the relays were as 

f-.iiows ~ rk 1 tea.; Bekei 

\i 1-.'. 4 — Kldridge It 14 M 

and Wl II l-'» se. 

I ..iir . C. runners were entered 

in the diiap .'.('-yards dash. 

W hitm c ) ead Davie- (8) ran in 



Shoot 956 in Their Victory Over Cor- 
nell. Still Tied with Harvard. 



Announced by Manager Bokelund. Ten 
Matches Promised. 



the s. k s 



b§«t A limit-handicap 

man w. jjj s heat ; Davics was t